Spamdex - Spam Archive

Report spam

Send in your spam and get the offenders listed

Create a rule in outlook or simply forward the spam you receive to questions@spamdex.co.uk

Also in citylab.com

Can Cities Make Big Business Pay?

Today on CityLab
Also: Cutting transit fares for low-income riders, and one thing Uber hasn’t disrupted.
Today on CityLab
jun 11, 2018

What We’re Following

Head hunters: Last month, Seattle passed a controversial tax to tackle its housing crisis. The bill became known as the “Amazon tax” after the company threatened to halt construction if the measure was approved, but other companies also said it would stifle business development in the city. The “head tax,” based on the number of workers hired by businesses, isn’t unprecedented, but Seattle became a prominent example that others are watching closely.

Now, after the tax’s approval, Amazon, Starbucks, and others have quietly poured hundreds of thousands of dollars into a campaign to revoke the tax by a citywide vote this November. If the ballot initiative collects enough signatures this month, the referendum is sure to reignite the fight between housing and labor activists who advocated for the bill and the companies that want to stop it. CityLab’s Sarah Holder reports: The Battle Over Seattle’s ‘Amazon Tax’ Isn’t Actually Over

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

New York City Will Cut Transit Fares for Low-Income Riders

It’s financial redistribution in a capital of income inequality.

Laura Bliss

There's One Thing Uber Hasn't Disrupted: Work.

Despite the gig-economy hype, the share of independent workers in the U.S. has dropped over the last decade. And Uber itself has a smaller role as an employer

Sarah Holder

One Nation, United Yet Different: Valuing Localism

The United States is an amalgam of places and people. As long as essential values are preserved we should appreciate the ability of local government to respond to unique communities.

Stephen Goldsmith

The Indigenous Voice of Mexico City

Slowly, native culture seems to be emerging from the shadows.

Feike de Jong and Gustavo Graf

The Case for ‘Sanctuary Cities’ for Endangered Species

Non-native animals and plants often arrive in cities by happenstance and carve out ecological niches for themselves. But if cities were more deliberate about biodiversity, they’d take in well-suited species that are struggling elsewhere.

Ursula K. Heise


Stop Signs

A Lucy Parsons Lab map of street and traffic stops by Chicago police between 2014 and 2016.
A map of street and traffic stops by Chicago police between 2014 and 2016. (Lucy Parsons Lab)

In 2014, Chicago had a four-month stretch when its residents were stopped-and-frisked at four times the rate of New Yorkers in 2011, when the city’s practice was at its peak. After the ACLU of Illinois released a report drawing out that shocking contrast, the city agreed to keep better records of the stops and searches. Now the Lucy Parsons Lab, a non-profit technology collective focused on police accountability, is visualizing the information made available to see where people are being stopped in Chicago.

The map above compares street and traffic stops overall by Chicago police between 2014 and 2016, but the project drills down to a neighborhood level to determine how these interactions between police and residents breakdown by race. Read Tanvi Misra’s analysis on CityLab: Where Chicagoans Are Being Stopped and Frisked


What We’re Reading

ICE came for a Tennessee town’s immigrants. The town fought back. (New York Times)

Ford buys a train station in Detroit (Detroit News)

Why Anthony Bourdain meant so much to marginalized communities (Slate)

How racial segregation influenced California’s upzoning bill failure (Next City)

Stuffed crust infrastructure: Domino’s Pizza is paving potholes? (Yahoo)


Tell your friends about the CityLab Daily! Forward this newsletter to someone who loves cities and encourage them to subscribe. Send your own comments, feedback, and tips to hello@citylab.com.

Follow us on social media for even more CityLab content.


 

---------------------------

All titles, content, publisher names, trademarks, artwork, and associated imagery are trademarks and/or copyright material of their respective owners. All rights reserved. The Spam Archive website contains material for general information purposes only. It has been written for the purpose of providing information and historical reference containing in the main instances of business or commercial spam.

Many of the messages in Spamdex's archive contain forged headers in one form or another. The fact that an email claims to have come from one email address or another does not mean it actually originated at that address! Please use spamdex responsibly.


Yes YOU! Get INVOLVED - Send in your spam and report offenders

Create a rule in outlook or simply forward the junk email you receive to questions@spamdex.co.uk | See contributors

Google + Spam 2010- 2017 Spamdex - The Spam Archive for the internet. unsolicited electric messages (spam) archived for posterity. Link to us and help promote Spamdex as a means of forcing Spammers to re-think the amount of spam they send us.

The Spam Archive - Chronicling spam emails into readable web records index for all time

Please contact us with any comments or questions at questions@spamdex.co.uk. Spam Archive is a non-profit library of thousands of spam email messages sent to a single email address. A number of far-sighted people have been saving all their spam and have put it online. This is a valuable resource for anyone writing Bayesian filters. The Spam Archive is building a digital library of Internet spam. Your use of the Archive is subject to the Archive's Terms of Use. All emails viewed are copyright of the respected companies or corporations. Thanks to Benedict Sykes for assisting with tech problems and Google Indexing, ta Ben.

Our inspiration is the "Internet Archive" USA. "Libraries exist to preserve society's cultural artefacts and to provide access to them. If libraries are to continue to foster education and scholarship in this era of digital technology, it's essential for them to extend those functions into the digital world." This is our library of unsolicited emails from around the world. See https://archive.org. Spamdex is in no way associated though. Supporters and members of http://spam.abuse.net Helping rid the internet of spam, one email at a time. Working with Inernet Aware to improve user knowlegde on keeping safe online. Many thanks to all our supporters including Vanilla Circus for providing SEO advice and other content syndication help | Link to us | Terms | Privacy | Cookies | Complaints | Copyright | Spam emails / ICO | Spam images | Sitemap | All hosting and cloud migration by Cloudworks.

Important: Users take note, this is Spamdex - The Spam Archive for the internet. Some of the pages indexed could contain offensive language or contain fraudulent offers. If an offer looks too good to be true it probably is! Please tread, carefully, all of the links should be fine. Clicking I agree means you agree to our terms and conditions. We cannot be held responsible etc etc.

The Spam Archive - Chronicling spam emails into readable web records

The Glass House | London | SW19 8AE |
Spamdex is a digital archive of unsolicited electronic mail 4.9 out of 5 based on reviews
Spamdex - The Spam Archive Located in London, SW19 8AE. Phone: 08000 0514541.