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The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning,
San Bernardino Shooting
A heavily armed couple stormed a holiday gathering for county employees in San Bernardino, Calif., in the deadliest mass shooting in the U.S. in the past three years. According to police, Syed Farook left a work holiday party in anger and returned with his wife, Tashfeen Malik. The pair, dressed in “assault-style clothing,” opened fire, killing 14 people and wounding 17 others. Hours later, they were killed in a gunbattle on the street with police. Law-enforcement officials haven’t ruled out terrorism and noted that some level of planning went into the attack based on how the pair were equipped. President Barack Obama responded to the shooting by repeating his call for stricter gun control laws.
Iran’s Nuclear Path
The IAEA, the United Nations’ nuclear watchdog, said it believed Iran was working in a “coordinated” way on nuclear arms until 2003 and that some activities continued beyond then. However, it concluded that there were no “credible indications” of related activities after 2009. The mixed findings in the report, which also indicated that Iran showed limited cooperation with investigators, fueled critics who said the July nuclear deal between Iran and six world powers were too easy on Tehran. The Obama administration welcomed the findings, and said it would likely pave the way for the removal of economic sanctions on Tehran as early as January.
Crude Realities
Oil prices fell below $40 a barrel yesterday amid a growing glut, putting more pressure on an industry that is already a major weak spot for global growth. Prices rebounded this morning on reports about a possible cut in OPEC production ahead of the organization’s meeting on Friday. The standoff—and discontent with the Saudi policy—is coming to a head at this week’s meeting. Meanwhile, investors targeting struggling energy companies are learning a painful lesson: Bankruptcy isn’t always the bottom. And if Western sanctions are lifted on Iran, the oil-rich country is likely to be selling as much as 500,000 new barrels into an already saturated market.
Slow Moving in the Fast Lane
Thanksgiving travel saw few hitches, but recent cutbacks in the TSA’s PreCheck lanes threaten to increase wait times for fliers. Our Middle Seat columnist Scott McCartney examines airport screening procedures and looks at how to use PreCheck to reduce waiting time. The program moves people vetted through background checks into fast lanes where they can leave shoes and light jackets on, leave liquids and computers in bags and walk through metal detectors instead of standing in full-body scanners. Once cleared for PreCheck, you’ll be issued a Known Traveler number, which you must load into your airline frequent-flier profiles to make sure it is attached to each reservation.
TODAY'S VIDEO
Yahoo Drama Explained
That Was Painless
Yahoo, one of the oldest and most well-known online companies, may be putting its core business up for sale. The WSJ’s Rick Carew explains why. Photo: Getty
TOP STORIES
U.S.

U.S. Wages Show Signs of Breaking Out

More Security Lapses by Secret Service Disclosed
WORLD

South Africa Supreme Court Convicts Oscar Pistorius of Murder

U.K. Joins Airstrikes in Syria Against ISIS
BUSINESS

YouTube Seeks Streaming Rights to TV Shows, Movies

Yahoo’s Internet Business Draws Interest
MARKETS

Wall Street Goes Short on Bond Traders

Feds Win Fight Over Risky-Looking Loans
NUMBER OF THE DAY
5.3%
The increase in spending on all health care in 2014, according to a report from actuaries at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. That compares with the 2.9% growth in 2013, which marked the lowest rate since the government began tracking the gains 55 years ago.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
I don’t need unanimity. I think we have to tolerate some dissent.
Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen signaled she’s ready to raise short-term interest rates this month, but suggested she sees dissension within her ranks, which could complicate her moves toward ending seven years of near-zero rates.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Going back to our story above, what are your thoughts on the future of oil prices? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Khadeeja Safdar
READER RESPONSE
Yesterday we asked for comments on Jeb Bush’s presidential bid. Jesse Solis of Indiana wrote, “It really is hard to gauge how well a candidate can succeed in the primary election until after the first four caucuses. Jeb still has a very strong base of baby-boomer voters who want to leave their mark on the country before they are no longer the ruling class. Although I think Gov. Bush dropping the race would move his voter base over to Sen. Rubio, which would allow him to take the lead and finally dismantle this Trump Circus, he still does have a chance at the nomination. It is nearly impossible to tell who can win a race simply based off polls.” From Massachusetts, Don Hutchinson commented that “Jeb talks too much about his past and not enough about what he will do to solve current problems” and described him as “cautious even timid, to avoid alienating anyone, but in the process coming across as vague—the very opposite of Trump’s appeal.” From Monaco, Simon Gaul wrote, “Other than the fact that the ‘brand’ is irredeemably tarnished by both 41 & 43, the real issue is amplified by the lack of emotional and intellectual conviction that is self-evident in Mr. Bush’s persona every time he rises—or fails to—an occasion. The very air of failure pervades…” And Martin Soy weighed in from California: “Jeb does not seem to have the fire in his belly for the job of president. He needs to drop out of the race.”
This daily briefing is named "The 10-Point" after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary "What's News" digest of top stories. Technically, "10-point" referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.
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