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The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning,
Markets on the Edge
Major stock indexes around the world hit multiyear lows yesterday as bank stocks led the intensifying rout, amid concerns that global central banks struggling to boost growth will worsen an already tough environment for lenders. Investors also piled into gold, seeking shelter on fears that a turn toward negative interest rates in some countries is threatening to destabilize the global financial system. A rally in energy and banking shares lifted European markets today, with the Stoxx Europe 600 up 1.8% in early trade. Meanwhile, monetary-policy makers are coming to the grim conclusion that financial markets aren’t letting them tighten financial conditions gradually. The market turmoil speaks to deeper problems and could spark a recession, even as current U.S. economic data show no recession, writes our commentator Greg Ip.
Wolves of Wall Street
As a new populist wave gains muscle ahead of the presidential elections, ties to Wall Street have become increasingly unpopular. Bernie Sanders has repeatedly attacked Hillary Clinton for her connections to financial firms, including her large speech fees. In the two years before launching her presidential campaign, she personally received $4.1 million in fees from financial institutions for closed-door talks that attendees described as friendly and light. The topic came up again in a wide-ranging Democratic debate last night. During the debate, both candidates appealed to minority voters who will play a larger role in the next two races, in South Carolina and Nevada. And in the GOP race, former President George W. Bush will campaign with his brother, Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush, on Monday in South Carolina. And John Kasich is betting his campaign on the Midwest and relocated Midwesterners.
A Deal Is a Deal
A new shift is scrambling an already complex diplomatic landscape. World powers agreed early today to reach a cease-fire in Syria in one week, allowing aid in but giving Russia and the Assad regime time to press an offensive that has expanded the Kremlin’s clout in the region. Russia’s stepped-up military operations in Syria are also splitting Washington’s Middle East allies, with some countries beginning to see a need to work with the Kremlin as it fortifies President Bashar al-Assad’s regime, according to Arab, Israeli and U.S. officials. Rebels fighting the regime say their survival depends on changing tactics and shifting to guerrilla warfare, as their territorial losses to the regime and its Russian and Iranian allies mount.
Fashion Compassion
WSJ Magazine’s March women’s style issue debuts tomorrow with one of fashion’s most iconic faces on the cover: Christy Turlington Burns, the supermodel who has launched a nonprofit organization, Every Mother Counts, focusing on women’s health initiatives around the globe. Elsewhere in the issue, an interview with Jasper Johns, the reclusive artist who at 85 continues to create innovative work; a look back at the original Barneys flagship store during its heyday in the 1980s and 1990s, as the retailer reopens the Chelsea location this month; a preview of Christopher Kostow’s new restaurant in Napa; the tightknit creative team behind fashion designer Jonathan Anderson; and an in-depth profile of Tom Campbell and Sheena Wagstaff of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, as the institution inaugurates the Met Breuer building (in the former home of the Whitney) and expands its contemporary collection among a crowded field of competitors.
TODAY'S VIDEO
Gravity Waves Detected, Verifying Einstein’s Theory
That Was Painless
Scientists announced they have directly detected gravitational waves for the first time, verifying an unproven portion of Einstein’s Theory of General Relativity. WSJ’s Robert Lee Hotz reports.
TOP STORIES
U.S.

Oregon Standoff Ends as Last 4 Occupiers Surrender

Veterans’ Wait After Trump Fundraiser Shows Hurdles for Campaign
WORLD

Mexico Prison Riot Leaves Dozens Dead

NATO Deploys Ships to Aegean to Help in Migrant Crisis
BUSINESS

Uber Executives’ Trial Gets Under Way in Paris

Honda Revives Ridgeline Pickup, Aiming to Lessen Reliance on Cars in U.S.
MARKETS

Activist Investors Make Peace With AIG

New Lender Worry: Oil Firms Max Out Credit Lines
NUMBER OF THE DAY
$350 million
The amount U.S. and Canadian oil producers are losing each day at current oil prices, according to an analysis by AlixPartners. As crude prices slide toward $25 a barrel, many oil companies have little choice but to start making the steep cost cuts they have avoided up until now,
QUOTE OF THE DAY
If it’s the leader of Boko Haram and he wants to post pictures of his two-year-old and some kittens, that would not be allowed.
Monika Bickert, Facebook’s head of global policy management, on the company’s new approach to terrorist content
TODAY'S QUESTION
What are your thoughts on Facebook’s policy? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Khadeeja Safdar
READER RESPONSE
Responding to yesterday’s question on the demographic challenges facing candidates, Greg Weaver of Texas commented: “While the demographics indeed have an impact, they are a significant back seat issue to the general discontent with politics as usual. I have spoken to no one who is happy with the president, the Congress or the Senate in years. While Sanders and Trump may be a tad frightening as unknown entities, they embody change. That appeals to all demographics except the illegitimately wealthy.” From Illinois, Bob Schafer wrote: “It remains to be seen if minorities here have really been bought and paid for by the Democrats. With the level of dependency Senator Sanders is selling, he could very well capture these millions who prefer the dole to a job.”
This daily briefing is named "The 10-Point" after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary "What's News" digest of top stories. Technically, "10-point" referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.
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Copyright 2016 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.   

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