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The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning,
Apple Picking
Apple’s refusal to assist the FBI in opening up an alleged terrorist’s iPhone marks a new legal front in the long-running battle between privacy and national security. The world’s largest company has vowed to fight a judge’s order requiring it to help the FBI circumvent a passcode protection system on the phone used by one of the San Bernardino terrorists. “The implications of the government’s demands are chilling,” Apple CEO Tim Cook wrote in a strongly worded letter to customers. Now, both sides are bracing for the case ultimately to reach the Supreme Court, and the possibility that it could prompt Congress to act. The legal fight highlights the growing role of encryption in digital life. “Tim Cook is playing a dangerous game of brinkmanship with the U.S. government,” writes our tech columnist Christopher Mims. At the same time, Mr. Cook may be taking a stand to underscore to privacy-conscious consumers that he is on their side. To better understand his position, watch his interview with me from our WSJD Live conference last October.
Cruz Control
Support for Donald Trump among Republicans has declined in the past month, leaving him slightly behind Sen. Ted Cruz in the GOP presidential race, according to a new Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll. This marks the first time since last autumn that the poll has found anyone other than Mr. Trump in the lead among Republicans nationally. Our poll differs from other recent national surveys that continue to show Mr. Trump steadily ahead, so whether these results mark an important shift or are merely statistical noise remains to be seen. In any case, the latest numbers come ahead of Saturday’s Republican primary in South Carolina, where Mr. Trump appears to hold a commanding lead. Democratic candidates, meanwhile, are vying for the support of Nevada’s minorities ahead of the contest there. The poll also revealed that Americans are just as divided as politicians over whether the Senate should consider President Barack Obama’s forthcoming nominee for the Supreme Court vacancy created by the passing of Justice Antonin Scalia.
Cut Down to Size
The too-big-to-fail debate has moved beyond a simple argument over whether banks should be broken up just because of their size. The Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis’s new president, Neel Kashkari, called for policy makers to consider breaking them up to prevent future government bailouts. “The reality is that there is no perfect size for banks, nothing that makes them perfectly safe,” writes Heard on the Street’s David Reilly, who argues that Mr. Kashkari’s speech missed the point. The recent battering of bank stocks, meanwhile, is putting heat on the European Central Bank not to cut subzero interest rates even lower next month, but policy makers don’t appear swayed by such concerns. And in other market news, European stocks and U.S. futures steadied after Wall Street posted its biggest three-day rise since August.
Text, Study, Crash
After years of cellphone bans, many teachers now invite students to use smartphones for homework and during class. Some parents say they felt somewhat uncomfortable, at least at first, to see their children spending even more time on their phones, but many high-schoolers have already made phones essential for doing their daily homework, classwork and research projects. However, parents may find another potential cause for concern: walking while texting. Emergency-room visits by smartphone-distracted pedestrians have soared 124% over the last five years. As injuries rise, what responsibility do tech companies have to address the problem? Our personal tech columnist Geoffrey Fowler explores the issue in his latest piece.
TODAY'S VIDEO
South Carolina Governor Haley Backs Rubio for President
That Was Painless
Just days before the South Carolina primary election, Republican Gov. Nikki Haley endorsed presidential hopeful Marco Rubio at an event in Lexington County.
TOP STORIES
U.S.

President Obama Plans Historic Visit to Cuba in March, Official Says

Pope Pleads for Migrants at U.S.-Mexico Border
WORLD

China Positions Missiles on Disputed South China Sea Island

Powerful Car Bomb Rocks Turkish Capital
BUSINESS

Wal-Mart Works to Win Back Shoppers

Nestlé Pressured by Slower Emerging Markets
MARKETS

Iran Balks at Committing to Capping Its Oil Production

Online Lender Prosper Increases Rates
NUMBER OF THE DAY
$132 million
The annual net profit of Air France-KLM in the 12 months to Dec. 31, its first since 2008, as successive cost-cutting plans have finally yielded results and cheap jet fuel made its operations more profitable.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
The excitement that people have for technology these days is the same sort of excitement they have for books and movies and TV shows and comics.
Steve Wozniak on bringing Hollywood and Silicon Valley together at the Silicon Valley Comic Con.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Going back to our story above, what are your thoughts on the new poll results? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Khadeeja Safdar
READER RESPONSE
Responding to yesterday’s question on the future of oil prices, Amar Singh of Virginia wrote: “Low prices will take care of low prices in the long run. A harsh price environment will eventually force a negative supply shock (which we are already witnessing in U.S. Shale) which will bring higher prices. The problem is that this time, the cycle will take longer as Iran and other countries either resist cutting production or increase production. It’s not a question of whether or not prices rebound; it’s just a matter of when.” From Alaska, Ted and Francoise Gianoutsos commented: “The price of oil is as slippery as the oil itself, whose price will continue to slip up and down manipulated far more by slippery producers than by supply and demand!”
This daily briefing is named "The 10-Point" after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary "What's News" digest of top stories. Technically, "10-point" referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.
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