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The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning,
Attitude Adjustment
Donald Trump’s march toward the Republican presidential nomination faces important tests today in Michigan and Mississippi, states where rivals Ohio Gov. John Kasich and Sen. Ted Cruz are betting their regional appeal will serve as an antidote to Mr. Trump’s outsider campaign. But polls suggest Mr. Trump has a big advantage in Michigan and leads in Mississippi. Meanwhile, Sen. Marco Rubio has suddenly become almost an afterthought, trailing in Michigan polling. Mr. Trump’s popularity relies on his supporters overlooking his many contradictions, writes our Washington bureau chief Gerald F. Seib. From his emphasis on big goals over detailed plans to his stance that everything is negotiable anyway, attitude trumps agenda for the GOP front-runner. Mr. Trump’s foreign policy ideas, for instance, have spooked diplomatic advisors from both parties, but he has been unapologetic.
Valuable Junk
The riskiest part of the U.S. corporate-bond market is staging a comeback, marking an upswing in investor confidence following a turbulent start to the year. Returns on junk bonds turned positive for 2016 this month, reversing a sharp selloff at the beginning of the year. The surge is one of the most convincing signs that the recession fears that rattled markets earlier this year have faded. While analysts continue to scrutinize stock valuations amid soft global-growth expectations and slumping U.S. corporate earnings, many portfolio managers say stocks and junk bonds look relatively attractive at a time when yields on safe assets such as government bonds are in many cases near record lows and falling. U.S. stocks tiptoed to their longest rally since October yesterday as a rise in oil prices lifted energy shares.
Striking at the Heart of the Enemy
U.S. warplanes conducted airstrikes on what Pentagon officials said was an al-Shabaab training camp in central Somalia, killing more than 150 suspected fighters as the Islamist militant group grows increasingly aggressive across the East African nation. The strikes came after intelligence indicated that fighters at the Raso training camp were in the final preparations for an attack, potentially against a peacekeeping force. They were among the largest in a string of U.S. attacks that have claimed some of the militant group’s top leaders in recent years. The Pentagon confirmed the attack two days after it occurred. Meanwhile, the Obama administration said yesterday it would release casualty totals of people killed in U.S. counterterrorism strikes abroad, in what it describes as an effort to bring greater transparency to one of the most controversial aspects of the war on terrorism.
Take as Directed
Researchers are seeking clues to one of the most common and wrenching decisions in mental health: when to stop antidepressant medication. The main concern about going off medication is the possibility of relapse, a risk which continuing the drugs can cut in half. Depression is a cyclical disease: Those who have had one episode of depression have a 50% chance of having a second. But antidepressant medications can come with significant side effects. And the prospect of taking medication for decades may not be appealing—especially among those who have been feeling well for years. Now, researchers are looking for patterns of brain activity or other indicators that might reveal which people are most likely to relapse. Scientists also are finding that psychological treatments, such as mindfulness cognitive behavioral therapy, can help prevent relapse in people coming off antidepressant medication.
TODAY'S VIDEO
Doping Fault
That Was Painless
Five-time Grand Slam tennis champion Maria Sharapova said at a news conference that she tested positive for a banned substance at the Australian Open in January.
TOP STORIES
U.S.

After Ferguson, Cities Face a Body-Cam Dilemma

More Street Gangs Turn to Financial Crimes
WORLD

White House Working on Renewed Mideast Peace Push

EU, Turkey Agree on Outlines of New, Broader Migrant Deal
BUSINESS

McClendon Bet Big to Finance Second Act

Theranos Ran Tests Despite Quality Problems
MARKETS

Justice Department, SEC Investigating Visium

Alibaba Affiliate Ant Financial Valued at More Than $50 Billion
NUMBER OF THE DAY
$1.35 million
The fine Verizon will pay to settle an investigation with federal regulators over the wireless carrier’s use of so-called supercookies, pieces of software that tracked its customers’ Web usage.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
When I look at the data, it’s clear to me that if I entered the race, I could not win.
Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg on his decision not to run for U.S. president.
TODAY'S QUESTION
What are your thoughts on Mr. Bloomberg’s decision not to run? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Margaret Rawson
READER RESPONSE
Responding to yesterday’s question on political rivalries delaying an offensive to recapture Mosul, Iraq, Benjy Wolf of Florida wrote: “This is mind-boggling to the American way of thinking. You would hope that defeating an enemy like ISIS would cause competing factions to put aside their differences.”Rich Irwin of Ohio commented: “I guess the politics is more important than the people of Mosul. I think that is tragic for the people of Mosul and the prospects for an overall Mideast peace.” And Vikas Deshmukh of Texas weighed in: “The U.S. will have to decide who is our strongest partner, work out the strategy and get going. Today these players see us as undecided tentative prodders, at best. Once the U.S. resolve is apparent to them, they will either join in for the spoils of the war or be left behind.”
This daily briefing is named "The 10-Point" after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary "What's News" digest of top stories. Technically, "10-point" referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.
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Copyright 2016 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.   

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