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The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning,
Terror’s Expanding Reach
The pan-European effort to crack the Islamic State network behind the Paris and Brussels attacks is yielding an unsettling discovery—a web of interlocking terror cells whose dimensions authorities are still trying to grasp. European authorities said they suspect that several men detained in a number of countries over the Easter weekend all had connections to perpetrators of the deadly attacks. The string of arrests suggests a wider Islamic State presence in Europe than previously thought. Meanwhile, as Brussels struggles to regain its balance, a memorial rally in the center of the city yesterday was disrupted by a few hundred far-right protesters. And in another savage demonstration of the global reach of radical Islamist terrorism, at least 72 people were killed and hundreds more injured in an apparent suicide bombing at a park in Lahore yesterday. A Pakistani Taliban faction claimed responsibility for the attack that was aimed at Christians celebrating Easter.
Google Search
An Iranian charged with hacking the computer system that controlled a New York dam used a readily available Google search process to identify the vulnerable system. The process, known as “Google dorking,” isn’t as simple as an ordinary online search. Yet anyone with a computer and Internet access can perform it with a few special techniques. Hamid Firoozi stumbled onto the Bowman Avenue Dam in Rye Brook, N.Y., in 2013 by using the technique to identify an unprotected computer that controlled the dam’s sluice gates and other functions. He allegedly hacked his way in using other methods. The Justice Department last week accused Mr. Firoozi and six other Iranian hackers of attacking the U.S. financial system, in what was the first public indictment against hackers tied to the Iranian government.
No Refills
The world’s biggest oil companies are draining their petroleum reserves faster than they are replacing them—a symptom of how a deep oil-price decline is reshaping the energy industry’s priorities. In 2015, the seven biggest publicly traded Western energy companies replaced just 75% of the oil and natural gas they pumped, the biggest combined drop in inventory that companies have reported in at least a decade. The current oil glut has forced companies to cut spending wherever they can, but the risk is that cutting back on new projects now could lead to shortages and price spikes in the future. Still, big oil companies aren’t about to run out of crude, but their reserve volumes are facing other potential threats beyond low oil prices: Some investors have expressed concern about the implications of legislation to curb global warming.
Out of Touch
Apple marketing chief Phil Schiller claimed last week that the company’s new iPad Pro is aimed at anyone still using an old PC. It is a wonderful notion, writes our columnist Christopher Mims, but it isn’t clear the iPad Pro can deliver on that promise—at least not yet. For one, it is missing some tools essential to PC-like work, most notably a mouse or a trackpad. Moreover, Apple diminishes the tablets’ utility by making it harder than it should be for creators of workplace software to make money through its App Store. As its competitors, including Google and Microsoft, race to create hybrids of tablets and PCs that can function as either, Apple is missing a golden opportunity to dominate the touch-based world it pioneered with the iPhone.
TODAY'S VIDEO
Robots on the Docks
That Was Painless
With global trade expected to grow steadily in the coming years, ports around the world are being automated. Yet the U.S. lags behind.
TOP STORIES
U.S.

Biden-Clinton Friction Hangs Over Campaign

What Washington Risks by Stalling on Puerto Rico
WORLD

Syrian Government Regains Control of Palmyra From Islamic State

Turkish President Faces a Cool Reception in U.S. Visit
BUSINESS

Cost of Sports TV Raises Stakes in Yankees, Comcast Fight

Avon Nears Deal With Activist Investors to Avoid Proxy Fight
MARKETS

Fear Amid the Market Rally: Investors Raise Bets on Volatility

Want to Bet on Oil Companies? It’s All About the ZIP Code
NUMBER OF THE DAY
$119,790
The average line amount extended to homeowners in 2015, a record sum. As the broader mortgage market remains in the doldrums, banks are again touting home-equity lines of credit and cash-out refinances.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
We are a compassionate people in Utah because we understand religious persecution...We ought to keep out terrorists without keeping out people of a religious group.
Utah Gov. Gary Herbert on his pledge to continue welcoming refugees while most of his Republican counterparts want a review or pause in resettlement.
TODAY'S QUESTION
What are your thoughts on Utah’s welcoming stance on refugees? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Margaret Rawson
READER RESPONSE
Responding to Friday’s question on Starboard’s bid to oust all of Yahoo’s directors, Roy Farrow of Nevada wrote: “The attempt to oust the Yahoo board is justified...Too often the CEO picks board members, who in turn support the CEO regardless of competency. Shareholders deserve better, and in this case the CEO and board should tender their resignations and save the costs, borne by the shareholders, of the struggle.” Terry Lange of Texas commented: “It is fairly clear that Yahoo is facing some challenges, but I don’t think it is right for Starboard to act like a schoolyard bully and make threats. If they don’t like what is going on, they can sell their investment and move on. William Ackman and Pershing tried this tactic with Target and it eventually failed.” And Rich Irwin of Ohio weighed in: “If Starboard wants Yahoo that bad, then Starboard will get Yahoo that bad, and having Yahoo will be that bad.”
This daily briefing is named "The 10-Point" after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary "What's News" digest of top stories. Technically, "10-point" referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.
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