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The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning,
Government Hack
The U.S. government said yesterday it had cracked a terrorist’s iPhone without Apple’s help and is seeking to drop its legal case to force the tech giant to unlock the device. The move was announced in court papers filed in a dispute over a phone seized in the investigation of the Dec. 2 terror attack in San Bernardino, Calif. The FBI is focused now on reviewing the information contained on the phone, which was unlocked with help from a third party the government has refused to identify. The filing short-circuits a pending legal showdown over whether the government can force technology companies to write software to aid in criminal investigations, but it is unlikely to avert the long-term conflict over how secure electronic communications should be, and what firms should have to do to help the government access their customers’ data. Apple said the case should never have been brought, but added that it would continue to help law enforcement with investigations, while continuing to improve the security of its products.
Mysterious Suitor
Chinese insurer Anbang Insurance Group, which just upped the ante with a $14 billion all-cash offer in a bidding war with Marriott for Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, has a complicated web of investors. The Beijing-based company has exploded onto the international scene in recent years by spending billions to acquire insurers and hotels throughout the world. For all its ambition, Anbang remains opaque to many both inside and outside of China and little verified information exists in the public domain about its chairman, Wu Xiaohui. The company’s ownership is a mash of corporate shareholders, with multiple layers of holding companies registered all around the country. Anbang has gotten financial backing from state lender China Construction Bank for its Starwood bid, yet insurance-industry analysts in China have warned that the company’s aggressive acquisitions could be straining its books.
Brussels Breakdown
Belgian authorities, already beset by counterterrorism missteps, released a man yesterday they wrongly arrested as a suspected attacker in last week’s Brussels bombings, shifting their focus to two explosive-stained gloves found on a bus that left the airport soon after the deadly blasts. Frustrated in their efforts to crack the Islamic State network responsible for the bombings, the Belgians have also turned to the U.S. for help in scouring laptop hard drives and mobile phones seized in raids over the past week for any new break in the investigation. The large quantities of explosive chemicals found at the bomb-making lab of the Brussels terrorists represent a breakdown in an elaborate dragnet erected to prevent such chemicals from being used by terrorists. Meanwhile, Pakistan is still reeling following a bombing in a park in Lahore on Sunday. And in other news, an EgyptAir plane with more than 60 passengers and crew aboard was hijacked and forced to land in Cyprus this morning. Most of the passengers had been released and Cypriot President Nicos Anastasiades told reporters the hijacking was not related to terrorism.
Tough to Chew
In its quest to grow ever-bigger chickens to meet increasing demand for white meat, the food industry has hit an unexpected problem. A growing share of broiler chickens now can yield a pair of breast fillets that are heavier than an entire bird was a few decades ago. But a rising number of those fillets are laced with hard fibers in a condition the industry calls woody breast. It poses no threat to human health and can be so subtle as to go unnoticed by home cooks, but it degrades the texture of the meat. The cause isn’t known, but researchers say several decades of breeding in favor of heavier, faster-growing birds could be a factor. “It’s not the final weight so much as it is how fast the bird gets there,” said a professor emeritus of poultry science.
TODAY'S VIDEO
Ancient Treasures
That Was Painless
Syrian forces recaptured the historic city of Palmyra after 10 months of occupation by Islamic State fighters. Many of Palmyra’s famed antiquities survived but it could take up to five years to repair significant damages.
TOP STORIES
U.S.

Suspect in Custody After Gunfire at U.S. Capitol

Clinton Digs In as Trump Moves On
WORLD

Tourists Cut Back on Europe Trips After Bombings

ISIS Fails to Gain Much Traction in Yemen
BUSINESS

JetBlue, Alaska Air Bidding for Virgin America

Yahoo Sets April 11 Deadline to Submit Preliminary Bids
MARKETS

Squeeze the Parents: New Student Loan Goes Straight to Mom and Dad

The Markets Have a Message: Don’t Believe This Rally
NUMBER OF THE DAY
$25 million
The amount prosecutors charged former Blackstone Group managing principal Andrew W.W. Caspersen, most recently an executive at Park Hill Group, with stealing from investors, in addition to scheming to defraud them of $70 million more.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
We don’t need the empire to gift us anything.
Retired Cuban leader Fidel Castro slammed President Barack Obama’s recent visit to the Caribbean island, warning his countrymen to beware of Washington’s sweet talk as both nations embark on a long and uncertain path toward improved relations.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Going back to our story above, what are your thoughts on the government saying it unlocked a terrorist’s iPhone without Apple’s help? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Margaret Rawson
READER RESPONSE
Responding to yesterday’s question on Utah’s welcoming stance on refugees, Daniel Souza of Connecticut wrote: “Gov. Herbert should be commended for reaffirming Utah’s openness to accepting refugees despite the anti-immigration narrative of many in his own party. In doing so, he reminds us of the spirit of America and a core value on which our country is founded.” Augusta Era Golian of Texas said: “If Utah can control the flow rate and numbers of migrants coming into their state, they should be fine (barring terrorists). Problems arise when the numbers overwhelm resources and tolerance, as they have in Europe.” And Rick Dawley of North Carolina commented: “It is easy to say, in so many words, ‘let in the good folks and keep out the bad.’ The reality is that the governor is behind the curve. Most Americans recognize this as a fine sentiment, but that the devil is in the details. Even the best practices of vetting immigrants from ‘selected backgrounds,’ will never be perfect and the political left’s bias against effective targeting is a major hindrance.”
This daily briefing is named "The 10-Point" after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary "What's News" digest of top stories. Technically, "10-point" referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.
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