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The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning,
How Donald Captured the GOP
It is a political story without a rival in modern times. Having driven out the last of his rivals, Donald Trump is now the party’s presumptive nominee—a remarkable outcome that says as much about the GOP, caught in turmoil and transition, as it does about Mr. Trump. We chronicle the New York businessman’s path to the nomination, from his communications-heavy strategy and hard line on immigration to his incendiary comments and brutal response to few direct challenges from his rivals. Mr. Trump found opportunity in the rupture between Republican elites and the party’s grass roots, plotting the political equivalent of a corporate takeover as GOP leaders remained oblivious. Now facing a prospective tab of more than $1 billion to finance a general-election run for the White House, he reversed course yesterday and said he would actively raise money to ensure his campaign has the resources to compete with Hillary Clinton’s fundraising juggernaut.
Paying a Premium
Health insurers have begun to propose big premium increases for coverage next year under the Affordable Care Act, as some struggle to make money in a market where their costs have soared. While the rate picture will vary by state and by company, a number of insurers are likely to seek significant hikes—in some cases coming after earlier premium increases. The increases, along with the continued lagging results for insurers, are a sign that the exchange business hasn’t stabilized for insurers in the first few years of the health law’s full implementation, prompting health plans to continue to push for more changes to the law. A number of popular insurers say the enrollees who bought plans through the exchanges have brought health costs than they originally predicted—when they knew less about the impact of the law.
Hard Labor
One of the worst stretches ever for American productivity growth is getting even worse. Worker productivity—the output of goods and services for each hour of labor—slid in the opening months of the year as companies shelled out more on wages. The trend, if it continues, poses a challenge to the economy’s potential amid weak global growth and falling corporate profits. Declining productivity growth means companies need more workers to keep up with demand and helps explain why millions of people have been able to rejoin the job market in recent years despite a slow-growing economy. But poor productivity can also crimp companies’ profits and threaten workers’ wage growth and living standards over the longer run. Meanwhile, the trade deficit narrowed in March as imports fell faster than exports, underscoring slow growth at home and abroad.
Super Women
With Black Widow, Wonder Woman, Supergirl, and the Scarlet Witch, Disney-owned Marvel Entertainment and Warner Bros.-owned DC Entertainment are fulfilling the wishes of fangirls eager for female comic heroes. After decades of producing comics largely by and for men, these companies are making more female-led stories, putting out more female character merchandise and expanding on TV and in film. In March, 18 of the 100 best-selling comic books featured women in title roles. On the big screen next summer, Warner will release “Wonder Woman,” the first superheroine film since the 2005 flop “Elektra.” Women such as Elizabeth Olsen’s Scarlet Witch and Jennifer Lawrence’s Raven have played key supporting roles in team films like “X-Men,” but 36 superhero movies starring men will have been released in the time period between “Elektra” and “Wonder Woman.”
TODAY'S VIDEO
Growth Stage
That Was Painless
Two research teams working on separate studies have grown human embryos outside the uterus for up to 13 days. The embryos were grown in a petri dish in a process meant to mimic the embryo’s implantation in the uterus.
TOP STORIES
U.S.

Justice Department Launches Challenge to North Carolina Bathroom Law

Hillary Clinton Is Taking Fire From Two Rivals
WORLD

Turkish Power Struggle Threatens Ties to West

Rescue Mission in Iraq Led to U.S. Navy SEAL’s Death
BUSINESS

Tesla’s Losses Widen on Lower-Than-Expected Deliveries

Breeders Stew Over How to Slow Pace of Chicken Growth
MARKETS

Is Taxing Harvard, Yale and Stanford the Answer to Rising College Costs?

In Puerto Rico’s Debt Crisis, Shades of Argentina
NUMBER OF THE DAY
$270 billion
The cost, as of March, of projects the oil industry has deferred or canceled since crude prices began crashing nearly two years ago. The bulk of those spending cuts have involved high-tech projects once seen as crucial to sustaining global energy supplies.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
It all started as a joke...Nobody believed it was going to work.
Xavier Vanneste, heir to a dynasty of beer brewers in Bruges, Belgium, on his brewery’s beer pipeline that is just weeks away from completion.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Going back to our story above, what are your thoughts on health insurers proposing premium increases? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Margaret Rawson
READER RESPONSE
Responding to yesterday’s question on the Indiana primary results, Slade Howell of North Carolina wrote: “With Trump officially the GOP nominee, the party will be forced to undertake a very difficult task: Unifying a party that has been crashed by a candidate with principles (or lack thereof) contrary to many of its members. Failure to accomplish this may well result in the last days of the ‘Grand Old Party’ and the emergence of a new Conservative third party.” W.S. Thomas of Alabama commented: “The Indiana presidential primary results show that Donald Trump’s support is broad and that Hillary Clinton is far from invincible.” Jan Rogers Kniffen of Connecticut weighed in: “Had anyone told me that Trump would sew up the Republican Party nomination for president before Clinton could put hers away, I would have thought him or her a fool.” And John L. Hoh Jr. of Wisconsin asks: “Could we see Bernie Sanders supporters splinter from the Democrats and maybe a conservative candidate splinter from the GOP and have a four person race like 1860?”
This daily briefing is named "The 10-Point" after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary "What's News" digest of top stories. Technically, "10-point" referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.
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