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The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning from Japan, where I’m launching our WSJ CEO Council in Asia. The topic on everyone’s minds and lips here is—perhaps inevitably—the U.S. election in general and Donald Trump in particular!
Taking Care of Business
The U.S.’s biggest business lobby will launch an initiative on Tuesday to deploy influential Republicans to raise funds for tight Senate races, hoping to help the GOP in its tough battle to keep control of the chamber in November. The Chamber of Commerce’s “Save the Senate” effort is being led by both Republicans who back Mr. Trump and those who have balked at doing so. Meanwhile, the search for an explanation of this year’s unusual political climate leads to a basic conclusion, writes our Washington bureau chief Gerald F. Seib: The recession that started in 2007 and the financial crisis of 2008 and 2009 scared and scarred the electorate more deeply and more permanently than has been recognized before. As Mr. Trump seeks to capitalize on these postrecession attitudes, he is hoping for a boost from Bernie Sanders supporters, though poll numbers indicate otherwise.
The Fight for Fallujah
Iraqi special forces advanced to the edge of Fallujah on Monday but struggled to enter the city, where Iraqi and U.S. officials said Islamic State extremists were amassing civilians to serve as human shields. The offensive aims to dislodge the Sunni extremists from the Iraqi city they have occupied the longest, and if successful could significantly weaken them ahead of an advance on the much-larger and symbolically more important target of Mosul. Winning Fallujah could also boost Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, who has faced political upheaval in recent months. However, the operation carries big risks, including its overtly sectarian tone, as Shiite militias deeply resented by many Sunnis took the lead in the early stage of the offensive. Fallujah is almost exclusively Sunni and at least 50,000 civilians are believed to be trapped in the city.
What Is a Bank?
The sobering reality of banking in 2016 is that lenders are awash in new regulations, and growing armies of rule-interpreters and enforcers—for good or ill—are bringing striking changes to banks’ internal cultures. Some bankers view these compliance officials as nuns with guns—ultraconservative but still dangerous. We take a look inside the awkward, sometimes maddening, relationships between banks and their regulators and explore the simple, if beguiling, conundrum about banks today: What are they? And what will they become? For most global banks, it is no longer a viable strategy to try to be all things to all customers around the world. Our series on the existential crisis facing banks begins with an examination of the rise and retreat of the megabank, demonstrated by Citigroup’s evolution as the financial crisis ushered in a new phase for banking.
Data-Based Diagnosis
The chairman of medicine at a major New York hospital system is betting he can predict if a patient has strep, pneumonia or other ailments not by ordering traditional lab tests or imaging scans, but by calculating probabilities with a software program. The predictive tool, which pops up on the screen of electronic medical records, prompts the doctor to answer a short series of questions about the patient’s condition. Based on that information, a calculator predicts the probability that the person has the suspected ailment. It may also recommend a course of action. The goal of the tool is to reduce the use of unnecessary tests and antibiotics, while also expediting appropriate care. But as would be expected, many doctors balk at the idea of a computer program telling them how to do their job.
TODAY'S VIDEO
Special Delivery
That Was Painless
In Sweden, three companies have teamed up to test a courier service that delivers groceries directly to your kitchen, without you needing to be home.
TOP STORIES
U.S.

Bayer’s Bid for Monsanto Disquiets St. Louis Area

Illinois Budget Standoff Nears One-Year Mark
WORLD

European Confidence Firms Despite Political Uncertainty

Israel’s New Defense Minister Faces Rift With Disgruntled Military
BUSINESS

Viacom Board Prepares for Fight With Redstones

Bacardi, Pernod Ricard Spar Over Rights to Rum Name
MARKETS

Fueling Oil’s Push to $50: Fear Is Back

Noble Group Puts Unit Up for Sale; CEO Quits
NUMBER OF THE DAY
$1.5 billion
The price Jazz Pharmaceuticals has agreed to pay for Celator Pharmaceuticals, a deal that represents a huge premium for a company with a promising leukemia drug but no revenue.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
The coming period is going to be a real test of whether or not OPEC is still alive.
Mohammad al-Sabban, an independent oil analyst and former senior adviser to the Saudi oil ministry, on OPEC’s future after the appointment of its newest representative—Saudi Arabia’s new energy minister, Khalid al-Falih.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Going back to our story above, what are your thoughts on the use of predictive models in medicine? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Margaret Rawson
READER RESPONSE
Responding to Friday’s question on the recent oil rally, Martin Soy of California wrote: “My reaction is ‘thank God.’ Oil is an important part of the economy where I live, and many people here have lost their jobs over the last couple of years. Also, America needs to reduce dependence on foreign oil, and healthier domestic prices will help that.” Roy Farrow of Nevada commented: “Some years ago, when demand was outstripping supply and OPEC ruled the market, the Saudi oil minister opined that demand would diminish before the world ran out of oil. He was right. So, enjoy the price spike.”
This daily briefing is named "The 10-Point" after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary "What's News" digest of top stories. Technically, "10-point" referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.
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Copyright 2016 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.   

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