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The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning,
Deadly Dilemma
The gunman authorities say massacred 49 people at a gay nightclub in Orlando on Sunday had proclaimed he wanted to be a martyr, traveled to Saudi Arabia and alarmed co-workers with claims of links to extremists—troubling hints of a homegrown terrorist but not enough to lead the FBI to conclude he was a clear menace. Omar Mateen is an example of precisely the threat that has vexed the agency in recent years: terrorists living in the U.S. whose self-radicalization is hard to spot. FBI Director James Comey defended the FBI’s handling of two previous probes involving the 29-year-old terror suspect, saying there are no indications agents missed clues that could have prevented the massacre. Mr. Mateen disguised his intentions in his final days, but his past held clues of instability and violence. During the hourslong standoff with the gunman, authorities tried negotiating with him as he threatened his captives and hinted of carrying explosives.
The Choice
As the presidential campaign unfolds, Americans will get the chance to decide, in the wake of the Orlando shooting, what kind of approach they favor to combat jihadist terror. This election’s two candidates, more than any other presidential contenders in the era of terrorism, present starkly different profiles on the subject, notes our Washington bureau chief Gerald F. Seib. Donald Trump appeared to hint Monday that President Barack Obama may be sympathetic to radical Islamists he said inspired the gunman in the nightclub attack. Mr. Trump also criticized both the president and Hillary Clinton for what he claims are lax immigration laws that contributed to the rampage. Mrs. Clinton, meanwhile, pushed for stricter gun laws, including the reinstatement of a ban on the sort of assault weapons used by the Florida gunman.
Shared Connection
Microsoft snapped up LinkedIn for $26.2 billion in the largest acquisition in its history, betting the professional social network can rev up the tech titan’s software offerings despite recent struggles by both companies. The deal is Chief Executive Satya Nadella’s latest effort to revitalize Microsoft, which was viewed not long ago as left behind by shifts in technology. Microsoft will pay $196 per LinkedIn share, a 50% premium to the social network’s closing price on Friday. Both boards approved the deal, and Reid Hoffman, LinkedIn’s chairman and controlling shareholder, supports the transaction. The tie-up will test Microsoft’s ability to meld a large acquisition with its own operations. The Redmond, Wash.-based company has struggled to integrate previous purchases, costing shareholders billions of dollars in the process.
Think Positive
Many of us—whether as a result of genetics, brain chemistry, our experiences or coping skills—tell ourselves too many negative thoughts. We ruminate, thinking the same negative, unproductive thoughts over and over. A well-developed thought “is like a ski track in the snow. The more you ski down a path, the easier it is to go down that path and not another,” says Alex Korb, a neuroscientist and author. But with intent and practice, you can turn off nagging self-doubt and reframe your thoughts constructively. Psychologists call the technique cognitive reappraisal. People who do it have better mental health and more life satisfaction, and even better-functioning hearts, research shows. We explore the technique’s steps, from building awareness to using supporting evidence to stop ruminating.
TODAY'S VIDEO
The Future of Apple
That Was Painless
At its annual developers’ conference on Monday, Apple showed off updates to its four major operating systems. Our Personal Technology columnist Joanna Stern reports on the highlights.
TOP STORIES
U.S.

Supreme Court Strikes Down Puerto Rico Debt-Restructuring Law

The Mystery of ALS Patients Who See Improvement
WORLD

A Yemeni City Adjusts to Life After al Qaeda’s Retreat

Uganda to Withdraw Troops From African Force Hunting Lord’s Resistance Army
BUSINESS

Firms That Left U.S. Still Enjoy Perks

Attention Shoppers: Yoga in Aisle 3
MARKETS

Tamed China Stocks Await MSCI Decision

The Most Pessimistic Bull Market in History
NUMBER OF THE DAY
18
The number of consecutive weeks of outflows from European equity funds, triggered by growing concerns that the U.K. may vote next week to leave the European Union. Investors are starting to worry that the impact of “Brexit” could cross borders.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
“You just delivered a pitch on structured leveraged loans to someone who lives in the middle of the desert with his camels.”
A Goldman Sachs executive wrote to a colleague in an internal email exchange, according to documents in a long-awaited trial in which Libya’s sovereign-wealth fund alleges Goldman took advantage of its lack of financial sophistication to draw it into losing trades.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Going back to our story above, what are your thoughts on Microsoft acquiring LinkedIn? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Margaret Rawson
READER RESPONSE
Responding to yesterday’s question on the shooting in Orlando, Norman Blanton of Oklahoma wrote: “This was a true tragedy. It will be compounded by the various groups and politicians trying to capitalize on it.” Patrick J. O’Connell of Texas opined: “I’m a conservative Texan and own a number of guns. I’ve been a hunter all of my adult life and I don’t own an assault type weapon. Unfortunately, it has become necessary to toughen up our gun ownership laws.” David Lazarus of New Jersey said: “By not using the term ‘Islamist terrorism,’ President Obama emboldens ISIS and other radical terrorists.” And Jocelyn Bowie of Indiana shared: “In the U.S., it has become de rigueur to talk about ‘allies’ for all sorts of movements. I hope what we all—men and women; gay and straight; Democrat, Republican, and Independent; U.S. citizens and Europeans; Christians and non-Christians; right-wing and left-wing; NRA members and pacifists—realize is that we are allies in the fight against extremism, whether we want to be or not...It’s a complex problem that defies a simplistic explanation and a silver-bullet solution.”
This daily briefing is named "The 10-Point" after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary "What's News" digest of top stories. Technically, "10-point" referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.
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