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The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning,
Target Turkey
Suicide bombers struck Turkey’s busiest airport on Tuesday, killing at least 41 people and injuring scores more in the deadliest of a string of attacks in Istanbul this year. Three bomb blasts shook the arrivals area of the international terminal at Istanbul Atatürk Airport at around 9:22 p.m. One assailant set off a bomb after being shot by police near a checkpoint just inside the terminal, and two other attackers blew themselves up outside—one near the entrance and one in a parking lot across the street, according to a Turkish official. No group had claimed responsibility hours after the attack. However, Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said initial findings of an investigation suggested Islamic State carried out the assault. Passengers and workers at the airport described the chaos after the attack.
With or Without You
British Prime Minister David Cameron began the knotty process of extricating his country from the European Union on Tuesday at his last summit with leaders of the other 27 member states, who told him there would be no special deals for ex-members. He urged the EU to be flexible on the treaty rule that grants EU citizens the right to live and work in other member countries if it wanted to maintain close economic ties with the U.K., but European leaders spurned that call—at least for now. The race to replace Mr. Cameron is under way, with the front-runners widely seen as Boris Johnson, former mayor of London, and Theresa May, the home secretary. Meanwhile, Wall Street is tallying up the winners and losers after the wild market reaction to last week’s vote. One theme has emerged early—the computers got it right and the humans got it wrong.
Trading Places
Donald Trump offered a starkly protectionist view on trade in an unusually detailed speech on Tuesday, pledging to scrap the current North American Free Trade Agreement, kill America’s involvement in the Trans-Pacific Partnership and label China a currency manipulator. The presumptive Republican nominee’s trade proposals amount to a wholesale rejection of longstanding Republican orthodoxy and leave the party with a candidate arguing against the very policies that most GOP leaders have enacted and supported. Mr. Trump’s speech put him closer ideologically to recent Democratic presidential candidates than to Republicans, and drew condemnation from both Democrats allied with Hillary Clinton and Republicans who have long sought to boost U.S. trade. Meanwhile, Mrs. Clinton promised to democratize technology, including the goal to connect every U.S. home to high-speed internet.
Work It Out
Health-club members are doing more than working out at the gym—they’re getting work done. Sensing a surge of demand, gyms are responding by building or expanding workspaces for members to set up laptops, charge phones and conduct business—sometimes for the entire day. The idea is to keep gym-goers lingering longer and accommodate the rising number of people who work remotely. Providing workspaces also increases members’ spending on discretionary items such as smoothies, yoga pants and massages. In the 1980s, some high-end health clubs built conference rooms for members, but they never caught on. Employers have since become more open to employees working remotely, and technology has made it easier. “I’ve seen people do full-on job interviews in the lounge,” Equinox’s vice president said of the design of one of the health-club’s London locations.
TODAY'S VIDEO
Robot Uprising
That Was Painless
Robocalls—those prerecorded, unwanted phone calls—are at a record high. Our Personal Technology columnist Joanna Stern explains how you can fight back against them, and why it matters.
TOP STORIES
U.S.

Zika Spending Bill Is Blocked by Senate Democrats Due to Planned Parenthood Exclusion

GOP-Written House Benghazi Report Faults Obama Administration
WORLD

Lebanese Army Raids Syrian Refugee Camps After Suicide Bombings

Colombia Turns to Marijuana as Rural Jobs Tool
BUSINESS

Honeywell CEO Cote to Step Down in March

Volkswagen to Pay Up to $14.7 Billion to Settle Diesel-Emissions Claims
MARKETS

Global Markets Steady After Brexit-Related Rout

Fidelity Just Made Buying an Index Fund Vanguard-Cheap
NUMBER OF THE DAY
$29 billion
The amount of money spent by banks globally on consultants last year, much of that for stress tests. Today U.S. banks that cleared the first round of annual stress tests will find out which ones can boost dividends or buy back shares.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
Why would you put your money with someone who wants to destroy you?
Randi Weingarten, leader of the American Federation of Teachers, on targeting hedge-fund managers she deemed a threat to teachers and urging unions to yank money from their funds.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Going back to our story above, what are your thoughts on Mr. Trump’s trade proposals? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Margaret Rawson
READER RESPONSE
Responding to yesterday’s question on the Supreme Court’s abortion rights ruling, Louise Nemanich of Arizona wrote: “It is about time that the Supreme Court took a stance to reverse the trend of state’s chipping away at women’s constitutional rights. Restrictions on abortions and restricted availability is also a class issue: wealthy women will be able to exercise their rights, but women with fewer resources will not.” Randy Bates of North Carolina weighed in: “The abortion question will always be fraught with angry debate until it is put to the people instead of the courts”. And John R. Casey Jr. of Florida commented: “It’s unfortunate that the Supreme Court has degenerated to become an overtly pro-abortion institution instead of ensuring that the Constitution and law-based review approach to a decision are maintained.”
This daily briefing is named "The 10-Point" after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary "What's News" digest of top stories. Technically, "10-point" referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.
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Copyright 2016 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.   

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