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The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News.

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning,
Germany’s Dilemma
Greece and its European creditors are scrambling to find a way to keep the country afloat after its emphatic rejection of tough bailout terms. Both sides are set to meet at a summit in Brussels today. Should the talks collapse and Greece stumble out of the eurozone, every member state would lose something—though some economists argue that there might be longer term gains from greater stability. But Germany arguably has the most to lose. It is grappling with its leadership role, and the pushback against its power in Europe is likely to grow if the crisis worsens or if Germany’s policies get more assertive. Back in Greece, capital controls, which limit withdrawals to €60 ($66) a day, are fast choking the economy, while the vortex ensnaring the banks is now also threatening deal hopes.
Slippery Slope
Gyrations in Chinese stocks and the prospect of more crude from the U.S. and Iran are reviving concerns about the global supply glut. Oil prices skidded to their biggest single-day declines in more than three months yesterday. Iraqi production also turned out to be larger than expected, and data showed production across the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries rising throughout June, analysts said. Commodity traders are worrying that the collapse in Chinese stocks will lead to a broader downturn in the real economy, as many investors borrowed heavily in China’s shadow lending sector. Our Heard on the Street writer Liam Denning looks at how China, Greece and Iran are upending the world’s oil market.
Bad Hair Day
After Chinese shares hit a seven-year high in June, new investors opened millions of accounts to play the rally. “My hairdresser said it was still a bull market and I needed to get in,” said one first-time investor. But many now face big losses. Since peaking this year on June 12, China’s stock market has been in a near steady decline, despite efforts by the government to reverse the trend. Here’s a look at how China’s stocks fell to earth. The selloff, meanwhile, continued yesterday, casting even more doubt on the potency of Beijing’s aggressive rescue efforts. The government’s response also risks cementing investors’ belief that Beijing will always bail them out. And we report that the biggest casualties may be companies that aren’t even listed there.
Ticked Off
Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne disease in the U.S. After being treated for it, some patients continue to have severe symptoms for years. Our health columnist Sumathi Reddy looks at why experts are divided on what causes this and how to treat it. In other health news, our columnist Melinda Beck looks at how distinguishing bipolar disorder from regular depression could lead to earlier diagnosis and improved therapies for bipolar patients. And in fitness, manual treadmills are gaining ground in high-end clubs and CrossFit Games events. The belts speed up and slow down with the runner, making them useful for short-burst workouts—and potentially safer.
TOP STORIES
U.S.

San Francisco Killing Sparks Illegal Immigrant Detention Debate

Fight Over Affordable Care Act Turns to Medical-Device Tax
WORLD

U.S. Seeks Mideast Shift to Follow Iran Deal

NATO Faces Dilemma as it Weighs Montenegro’s Bid to Join
BUSINESS

Director at Generic-Drug Giant Mylan Had Undisclosed Ties to Land Deal

Hacking Team, the Surveillance Tech Firm, Gets Hacked
MARKETS

Is This a Coffee Shop or a Bank?

Big U.S. Banks Refile ‘Living Wills’ After Regulatory Rebuke
TODAY'S VIDEO
GOP Hopefuls Distance Themselves From Trump
That Was Painless
Rivals for the Republican presidential nomination are distancing themselves from the billionaire businessman and comments he has made about Mexican immigrants. WSJ’s Lee Hawkins reports.
NUMBER OF THE DAY
15.8636
The number of Mexican pesos that a dollar could buy at one point yesterday, according to data provider CQG —a record low for the peso against the dollar.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
The family constitutes the best ‘social capital.’ It cannot be replaced by other institutions. It needs to be helped and strengthened.
Pope Francis, at an open-air Mass in Guayaquil, Ecuador’s largest city, on the first full day of a weeklong tour of South America.
TODAY'S QUESTION
What are your thoughts on Greece’s future? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Khadeeja Safdar
READER RESPONSE
Responding to yesterday’s question about changes in airlines, Kathleen Charla of California commented: “I think it’s absolutely unconscionable what the airlines are doing—putting more seats on already overcrowded flights. It is not just unfair to passengers who pay more and more for tickets, to have less and less room to breathe, but it is also a safety issue.” And Paul Taube of Texas wrote: “Airlines have gone through significant changes over the last decade. Flights have been reduced, fuel surcharges added and services unbundled with separated charges for each service. Fortunately, bathrooms are still free! Poor service is now institutionalized!”
This daily briefing is named "The 10-Point" after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary "What's News" digest of top stories. Technically, "10-point" referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.
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Copyright 2015 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.   

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