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The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning,
The Battle for Mosul
A diverse coalition of Iraqi forces launched a long-awaited offensive against Islamic State in Mosul, one of the last major cities still controlled by the militant group. In a nationally televised announcement early Monday, Iraq time, Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi announced the start of the push to take back Iraq’s second-largest city. Reclaiming Mosul is seen as essential to the broader battle against Islamic State. The group has suffered a string of losses lately in its self-declared caliphate, including on Sunday, when Syrian rebels backed by Turkey and the U.S. drove the militants from the Syrian town of Dabiq. The assault on Mosul comes after months during which Iraqi forces have tried to capitalize on discontent with Islamic State’s harsh rule to turn locals against the group and seek aid for Iraqi forces.
Trump Tactics
Donald Trump on Sunday intensified his charge that the election is rigged against him by media bias and malfeasance at the ballot box, after his running mate, Mike Pence, tried to temper the nominee’s rhetoric by saying the Republicans would accept the Nov. 8 election result. The mixed messages on the GOP ticket come as Hillary Clinton enjoys a lead in polls. A new WSJ/NBC poll found Mrs. Clinton has an 11-point lead over Mr. Trump, 48% to 37%, a big jump from a 6-point edge she held in mid-September. Other polls suggest Mrs. Clinton has a somewhat smaller lead. Mr. Trump has begun arguing he will win the election on a surge of silent backers who have gone undetected by surveys and the political establishment. Meanwhile, the GOP headquarters in Orange County, N.C., was firebombed and sprayed with graffiti overnight, local officials said Sunday.
Trading Down
Some of the world’s biggest investors, worried about the broad slowdown in trade and growing worldwide populist opposition to deals that open markets, are shifting their money away from stocks buoyed by the so-called globalization premium. U.S. equity prices have been supported for the past three decades by an acceleration of global trade and a freer flow of capital. But now there is worry that the party is ending. Global trade this year will grow at the slowest pace since 2007, according to the WTO, just as protectionist policies are on the rise and efforts to liberalize trade have stalled. The IMF recently warned that anti-trade trends could cause long-term damage to the world economy, while companies around the globe have already pointed to slowing trade and rising protectionism as a drag on profits.
Food for Thought
Not too far in the future, when you reach for a healthy drink, it might contain water from a cactus. Nutrition science and customers’ rapidly changing tastes are forcing the food business to search ever farther afield for new edibles. It’s no longer enough to claim a product is simply free of something that’s frowned upon. Consumers want to know that the bad ingredient hasn’t been replaced with something equally bad or worse. And they want to know the story behind their food. We take a look at the next hot trends in food, from a new super green to fruit that imitates meat. We also look at how grocers are sprucing up their produce to keep Amazon at bay, why deep-discount chains are expanding across the U.S., and why you might consider paying your children to eat their vegetables.
TODAY'S VIDEO
Feelings Over Fundamentals
That Was Painless
The Shenzhen stock market, China’s busiest, is opening further to foreign investors—but many locals say it moves to a different rhythm, and stock-picking is still more poetry than fundamentals.
TOP STORIES
U.S.

Assisted-Suicide Fight Moves to Colorado

FBI Director Rejects Talk of Epidemic of Police Bias Against Blacks
WORLD

Philippine Leader Rodrigo Duterte Rolls Dice With Embrace of China

U.S., Britain Call for Immediate Cease-Fire in Yemen
BUSINESS

Cooling Appliance Makers Brace for Post-HFC Era

Restaurant Chains Get Burned by Overexpansion, New Rivals
MARKETS

The Ultimate Ebitda Fighting Championship

New Orleans’s Premier Bank, First NBC, Runs Into Problems
NUMBER OF THE DAY
1.5 million
The approximate number of illicit ATM withdrawals made in the U.S. by cyberthieves each year. While chip-enabled credit cards are expected to slow growth in fraud at the checkout counter, the ATM is now getting similar technology.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
Everybody was convinced that this time would be different...They thought the Chinese market was so hot, that commodity prices would continue to be very strong and Caterpillar would increase sales substantially.
Ken Banks, who retired in 2013 as manager for Caterpillar’s electric mining shovels, on the company’s spectacularly mistimed bet on production of machinery and equipment. Caterpillar now faces its fourth straight year of falling sales, the longest decline in its history.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Going back to our story above, what are your thoughts on the slowdown in global trade? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Margaret Rawson
READER RESPONSE
Responding to Friday’s question on Bob Dylan receiving the Nobel Prize in Literature, Suzy Conover of Michigan wrote: “A Nobel prize for writing? Lots of other artists come to mind that are more deserving. Sorry, Bob.” Drew Kelley of Nevada said: “The prize for literature goes to superb storytellers, and there were (are) few better than Mr. Dylan. For too long wordsmiths that match the story to music have been ignored. This is a welcome change.” Jacqueline Tillman Harty of Maryland weighed in: “Mr. Dylan articulated the voice of my quirky generation. From music and lyrics of protest and questioning to his recent embrace of the songs of our parents’ generation, he took us through a full circle of life—like a rolling stone.” And Karen Faul of Massachusetts commented: “It’s about time!”
This daily briefing is named "The 10-Point" after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary "What's News" digest of top stories. Technically, "10-point" referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.
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