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The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning,
Change in the Heartland
Small towns in the Midwest have diversified more quickly than almost any part of the U.S. since the start of an immigration wave at the beginning of this century. The resulting cultural changes appear to be moving the political needle. U.S. census data shows that counties in a distinct cluster of Midwestern states—Iowa, Indiana, Wisconsin, Illinois and Minnesota—saw among the fastest influxes of nonwhite residents of anywhere in the U.S. between 2000 and 2015. That shift helps explain the emergence of Donald Trump as a political force and signals that tensions over immigration will likely outlive his candidacy. We report that among GOP voters in this year’s presidential primaries, those in counties that diversified rapidly were more likely to vote for the New York businessman. Meanwhile, with polls showing the presidential race tightening, Hillary Clinton and Mr. Trump are moving advertising dollars and fine-tuning their closing arguments during the final week of one of the most unpredictable elections in modern history.
Not Neutrality
AT&T’s practice of exempting its streaming video services from data-usage caps is rankling competitors and shaping up as a major issue for regulators set to weigh the telecom giant’s proposed $85.4 billion acquisition of Time Warner. When AT&T rolls out its $35-a-month DirecTV Now online TV service this month, its wireless subscribers will be able to stream as much as they want without it counting toward their monthly data caps. But if the same customers binge on outside services like Netflix or Hulu, those bits will add up—potentially leading to surcharges. Streaming services, as well as media companies like 21st Century Fox, are likely to press regulators to scrutinize the practice—known as “zero rating”—in their review of the AT&T-Time Warner deal. TV networks that have streaming apps, like CBS and ESPN, also may have a stake in the matter.
Pipeline Bottleneck
An explosion and fire at a pipeline that delivers about one-third of the gasoline used on the East Coast is expected to raise prices at the pump and shows the fragility of a delivery system that is relied upon by tens of millions of people. Gasoline futures shot up as much as 15% on Tuesday in intraday trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange after the accident on Monday. Colonial Pipeline shut down its main gasoline and diesel pipelines after the incident in Shelby County, Ala., about 35 miles south of Birmingham. It was the second major disruption on the 52-year-old pipeline in two months. Contract workers performing maintenance on the system using an excavating machine struck one of the lines, causing an explosion and fire that killed one person and injured several others.
Laundry Literacy
The trickiest reading comprehension test may be inside our clothing. Basic items of clothing contain labels that are anything but basic. It is crucial to read the labels now because fabric is more complicated—and often more delicate—than ever. The newer wick-away, sweat-free synthetic fabrics in athleisure and workout clothing have distinct care needs, and synthetic blends are making their way into more fashions. Meanwhile, washers and dryers offer increasingly specialized settings, and detergents and fabric enhancers are getting more specific, adding to the necessity of reading and understanding the labels. But the cryptic symbols on clothing care tags, though designed to be a handy shortcut, don’t necessarily show how to get clothes their cleanest.
TODAY'S VIDEO
The Road to Mosul
That Was Painless
An Iraqi elite unit has reclaimed more than 25 miles of territory south of Mosul in the fight against Islamic State militants. In the two weeks since the offensive to retake Mosul began, dozens of villages have been cleared and the forces have entered the city limits. WSJ reporter Tamer El-Ghobashy followed the team last week.
TOP STORIES
U.S.

Obama Makes a Long-Shot Bid for TPP Trade Deal

Transit Strike Leaves Philadelphia Commuters Without Transportation
WORLD

After U.S. Election, Expect Hardening on China

Bank of Japan Stands Pat, Trims Inflation Forecasts
BUSINESS

GM, Fiat Chrysler Sales Slip in October Amid Fewer Selling Days

Black Friday’s Inside Secret: Same Deals Every Year
MARKETS

A Visit From the SEC? Doesn’t Happen for Thousands of Money Managers

Inflation Jitters Spark Retreat From Bond ETFs
NUMBER OF THE DAY
$10 billion
The amount for which Valeant Pharmaceuticals International is in advanced talks to sell Salix Pharmaceuticals, a big stomach-drug business, to Japan’s Takeda Pharmaceutical, a move seen easing pressure on Valeant caused by its hefty debt load.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
We hope the whole party is a safe space.
Peggy Gilbert, who has hosted a nonpartisan gathering of friends at her Dallas home every four years since 1980, on how the 2016 campaign is culminating in polarized election-night watch parties as nervous hosts take precautions.
TODAY'S QUESTION
What are your plans for election night? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Margaret Rawson
READER RESPONSE
Responding to yesterday’s question on the Affordable Care Act’s challenges in Arizona, Paul Kahle of California wrote: “As pointed out in the article itself, these problems are bubbling up in all states. The reason is that the insurance companies thought, in supporting this nonsense, that ultimately the tax payer would bail them out if they lost money. They actually had business strategies that required that bailout to succeed. Republicans in Congress put a stop to that. The simple fact is that if you don’t have a business model that can make money on its own then you don’t have a business.” Dan Goncharoff of New York said: “Maybe the better question is why the health-care law is succeeding in urban areas, but failing in rural ones. Maybe there are barriers to entry in rural areas? Maybe insurers should be required to cover both? Maybe rural areas need a government option? In any event, there needs to be more understanding of why the law is doing well for large numbers of people, to spread that success to a wider geographic area.” And Augusta Era Golian of Texas commented: “If we scrap ACA, what are we going to do for the 50% of the population that does not have employer coverage? We know where the Democrats want to go. But the GOP just keeps ducking the question.”

This daily briefing is named “The 10-Point” after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary “What's News” digest of top stories. Technically, “10-point” referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.

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