Spamdex - Spam Archive

Report spam

Send in your spam and get the offenders listed

Create a rule in outlook or simply forward the spam you receive to questions@spamdex.co.uk

Also in interactive.wsj.com

The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning,
The Comey Coaster
Just two days before polls close in the presidential race, the FBI said a review of new evidence gave it no reason to reverse its earlier recommendation that Hillary Clinton not face charges related to her email practices while secretary of state. FBI Director James Comey told lawmakers in a letter that nothing had been uncovered in a new batch of messages that had altered the department’s earlier conclusion, lifting the legal and political cloud that had hung over Mrs. Clinton’s campaign for 10 days. The announcement, following a breakneck review of the emails, ended a stretch of intense partisan rancor over the FBI’s decision to reveal that it had uncovered new evidence believed related to Mrs. Clinton’s email server on a laptop belonging to Anthony Weiner, the estranged husband of Clinton aide Huma Abedin. Meanwhile, we report that after months of campaigning, Mrs. Clinton has several apparent paths to the White House, while Donald Trump must all but sweep the battlegrounds where the race has centered and will likely need at least one Democratic-leaning state, too. Nationally, a WSJ/NBC News poll released Sunday found Mrs. Clinton leading Mr. Trump by 4 points among likely voters.

Paid Program

Sponsor Generated Content From Xerox

Why working more doesn't mean more work done.

Despite an expanded workday and workweek as well as huge investments in technology, productivity is still down. We need to reengineer how people, process, and technology can work better together. So work itself can work better.

Read more →

Chinese Passport for Banks
Beijing is considering allowing Wall Street firms to run their own investment-banking businesses on the mainland, a long-awaited step that would give them more access to China’s hard-to-crack domestic market. The move is being discussed as part of a new U.S.-China trade and investment framework. Firms such as Goldman Sachs and J.P. Morgan Chase potentially could operate investment-banking business in China on their own, whereas currently they must pair with domestic brokerages in joint ventures. The possibility of getting closer to the Chinese market is a breakthrough for global banks with limited access to the $7.48 trillion stock markets of Shanghai and Shenzhen and China’s domestic bond market. But China’s banks have become formidable rivals, and any agreement would need to be ratified by the U.S. Senate.
Left Fuming
Regulators in California recently discovered software installed on some of Volkswagen’s Audi models that appears to have allowed the cars to cheat carbon-dioxide emissions testing standards. The software was designed to mask emissions that are widely viewed as a factor in climate change, instead of smog as in the Volkswagen emissions-cheating scandal that erupted last year. It was detected four months ago during laboratory tests by the California Air Resources Board. It isn’t clear how seriously officials in California and Washington view the latest discovery, or whether Volkswagen had identified it privately to regulators. The discovery threatens fresh anger from officials, investors and car owners just as Volkswagen is wrapping up billions of dollars in settlements with states and owners of diesel-powered vehicles in the U.S. and a recall of nearly nine million tainted diesel vehicles in Europe.
Diamonds in the Rough
A small team of scientists working for De Beers is scrambling to stave off a looming threat that could tarnish the luster of mined diamonds: high-quality man-made stones. In the past few years, lab-grown diamonds have become indistinguishable from natural diamonds to the naked eye and are growing in sales. While still a small fraction of the market, synthetic gems could account for nearly one-tenth of rough-diamond sales within five years. Made by a small group of private companies as well as giants such as De Beers itself, man-made diamonds could undermine the value of the entire diamond industry, some experts say. We report that to counter the threat, De Beers last year started marketing a new, relatively cheap detector that can quickly screens batches of diamonds to spot synthetic stones.
Janet Reno, 1938-2016
Fomer U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno, the first woman to hold the post, died early this morning at age 78, her goddaughter told the Associated Press. Ms. Reno, who served from 1993 to 2001 under Bill Clinton, died at home in Miami from complications of Parkinson’s disease. Ms. Reno was at the center of controversies during her term, most notably the 1993 siege at the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Tex., that ended with fire consuming the building and at least 80 people dead.
TODAY'S VIDEO
Their Kind of Town
That Was Painless
Chicago Cubs fans celebrated their team’s historic World Series win on Friday with a parade through the city.
TOP STORIES
U.S.

Impact of Uncertainty Is Likely to Ease After Election Day

Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton Barnstorm for Florida Prize
WORLD

U.S.-Backed Forces in Syria Launch Offensive to Seize ISIS Stronghold Raqqa

China Says Two Elected Hong Kong Lawmakers Can’t Retake Oaths
BUSINESS

Corporate Profits Perk Up, but Caution Rules

U.S. to Launch New Chinese Steel Probe
MARKETS

Investor Angst Ratchets Up as Election Nears

Central Banks Facing Challenges From Political Events
NUMBER OF THE DAY
5% to 10%
The expected drop in Wall Street bonuses this year compared with last. The declines still leave employees at firms such as Goldman Sachs, where the average worker earned $350,000 last year, among the best-paid Americans. But they highlight the challenges facing banks—and the dwindling perks of working at one.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
I still don’t have my mom...And now I don’t even have satisfaction in knowing that whoever did kill her is away and they can’t hurt anybody else, they can’t hurt me.
Andrea Harrison on Larry son, who spent nearly 18 years in prison for the murder of Ms. Harrison’s mother before his conviction was overturned following DNA analysis. Relatives of victims say exonerations can leave them feeling overlooked, afraid and even angry.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Going back to our story above, what are your thoughts on the FBI’s latest announcement? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Margaret Rawson
READER RESPONSE
Responding to Friday’s question on federal prosecutors nearing possible criminal charges for price-collusion in the generic-drug industry, Slade Howell of North Carolina wrote: “The federal government never ceases to amaze. In the case of generic-drug companies, deviation from competitive forces results with encountering the full wrath of the law. At the same time, the solution to high medical cost and limited accessibility is addressed with restricting competition by not allowing policy purchases across state lines and advocating for a national single payer health care system.” Robert J. Boyd of Massachusetts said: “Drug companies are not immune from appropriate federal government investigation of improper actions regarding price fixing. Investigation should be done swiftly with proper sanctions applied depending on findings.” And Robert P. Youngman of New York commented: “Collusion to fix prices is a criminal offense and should be prosecuted, but, as I recall, nowhere in the Constitution does it give Congress the right to fix prices. Is this a witch hunt to compel price regulation? Will the price of your home be next?”

This daily briefing is named “The 10-Point” after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary “What's News” digest of top stories. Technically, "10-point” referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.

Sign up here to receive “Brexit & Beyond: Europe in Flux,” a daily email update on the unfolding Brexit process and its global implications for business and finance.

Email Settings Contact Us Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
SIGN UP FOR THIS NEWSLETTER
SUBSCRIBE FOR FULL ACCESS TO WSJ.COM
You are currently subscribed as . For further assistance, please contact Customer Service at support@wsj.com
Copyright 2016 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.   

---------------------------

All titles, content, publisher names, trademarks, artwork, and associated imagery are trademarks and/or copyright material of their respective owners. All rights reserved. The Spam Archive website contains material for general information purposes only. It has been written for the purpose of providing information and historical reference containing in the main instances of business or commercial spam.

Many of the messages in Spamdex's archive contain forged headers in one form or another. The fact that an email claims to have come from one email address or another does not mean it actually originated at that address! Please use spamdex responsibly.


Yes YOU! Get INVOLVED - Send in your spam and report offenders

Create a rule in outlook or simply forward the junk email you receive to questions@spamdex.co.uk | See contributors

Google + Spam 2010- 2017 Spamdex - The Spam Archive for the internet. unsolicited electric messages (spam) archived for posterity. Link to us and help promote Spamdex as a means of forcing Spammers to re-think the amount of spam they send us.

The Spam Archive - Chronicling spam emails into readable web records index for all time

Please contact us with any comments or questions at questions@spamdex.co.uk. Spam Archive is a non-profit library of thousands of spam email messages sent to a single email address. A number of far-sighted people have been saving all their spam and have put it online. This is a valuable resource for anyone writing Bayesian filters. The Spam Archive is building a digital library of Internet spam. Your use of the Archive is subject to the Archive's Terms of Use. All emails viewed are copyright of the respected companies or corporations. Thanks to Benedict Sykes for assisting with tech problems and Google Indexing, ta Ben.

Our inspiration is the "Internet Archive" USA. "Libraries exist to preserve society's cultural artefacts and to provide access to them. If libraries are to continue to foster education and scholarship in this era of digital technology, it's essential for them to extend those functions into the digital world." This is our library of unsolicited emails from around the world. See https://archive.org. Spamdex is in no way associated though. Supporters and members of http://spam.abuse.net Helping rid the internet of spam, one email at a time. Working with Inernet Aware to improve user knowlegde on keeping safe online. Many thanks to all our supporters including Vanilla Circus for providing SEO advice and other content syndication help | Link to us | Terms | Privacy | Cookies | Complaints | Copyright | Spam emails / ICO | Spam images | Sitemap | All hosting and cloud migration by Cloudworks.

Important: Users take note, this is Spamdex - The Spam Archive for the internet. Some of the pages indexed could contain offensive language or contain fraudulent offers. If an offer looks too good to be true it probably is! Please tread, carefully, all of the links should be fine. Clicking I agree means you agree to our terms and conditions. We cannot be held responsible etc etc.

The Spam Archive - Chronicling spam emails into readable web records

The Glass House | London | SW19 8AE |
Spamdex is a digital archive of unsolicited electronic mail 4.9 out of 5 based on reviews
Spamdex - The Spam Archive Located in London, SW19 8AE. Phone: 08000 0514541.