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The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning,
Trump’s Team
President-elect Donald Trump will name longtime banker and former Goldman Sachs executive Steven Mnuchin as Treasury secretary, turning to a campaign loyalist and fundraiser for the incoming administration’s top economic cabinet post. The choice is at odds with Mr. Trump’s message that economic and political elites have left the country damaged, but Mr. Mnuchin’s establishment profile may sit more comfortably with the Republicans in the Senate. The president-elect also is expected to name Wilbur Ross Jr. as his Commerce secretary nominee, selecting a fellow businessman whose name rings out in the Rust Belt. Mr. Trump selected former Labor Secretary Elaine Chao to be his transportation secretary. We report that after largely opposing his 2016 presidential campaign, financial-services executives are making fast friends with Mr. Trump. Meanwhile, Carrier has agreed to keep in Indiana roughly half of the 2,100 jobs it had planned to shift to Mexico, after a lobbying effort from the incoming Trump administration.

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Back from the Abyss
U.S. home prices have climbed back above the record reached more than a decade ago, bringing to a close the worst period for the housing market since the Great Depression and stoking optimism for a more sustainable expansion. The average home price for September was 0.1% above the July 2006 peak, according to the S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller U.S. National Home Price index released Tuesday. Adjusted for inflation, the index still is about 16% below the 2006 high. While prices have recovered, the market is flashing caution signs. The country is building far fewer homes than normal, the homeownership rate is near a five-decade low, and mortgages remain difficult to come by, especially for less-affluent buyers. Still, while housing has lagged behind some sectors of the economy in recent years, there are signs of gaining strength.
Rise of the Populists
Italian voters will decide Sunday on a constitutional change that would effectively strip the Senate of most of its powers. It is a gamble by Prime Minister Matteo Renzi—for Italy and abroad—and a centerpiece of his efforts to more quickly revamp Italy’s sickly economy. If he loses, Mr. Renzi has pledged to resign, making the vote a sign of confidence in his nearly three-year-old government, and a possible test of populism’s reach. Mr. Renzi’s popularity is declining, and recent polls suggest a no vote will prevail, though many voters remain undecided. Such an outcome would be the latest victory for antiestablishment politicians in a year that saw Brexit and a Trump presidential win, and would give a boost to Italy’s 5 Star Movement. Markets, meanwhile, have been unnerved at the prospect of a no vote.
Written in the Stars
The holiday shopping season has only just begun, but the reviews are already in—the online product reviews, that is. Retailers care more than ever about the commentary shoppers leave on their websites, and they are stepping up efforts to encourage more customers to share their thoughts. At the same time, chains are doing more to make the reviews useful and engaging, while discouraging anonymous commenters by verifying actual customers. Most retailers don’t hide or erase bad reviews. Increasingly, they monitor reviews and respond to complaints that might arise there. We explore why it turns out that five-star ratings aren’t the most influential: What’s known as “purchase likelihood” peaks when the average rating is between 4.2 and 4.5 stars.
TODAY'S VIDEO
Cool Meets Creepy
That Was Painless
Snapchat’s much-hyped video-recording sunglasses require rules for the real world, our Personal Technology columnist Joanna Stern says.
TOP STORIES
U.S.

Police Probe Ohio State Attack as Possible Terrorism

More Whites Die Than Are Born in One-Third of States
WORLD

Embattled South Korean President Park Opens Door to Leaving Office

Donald Trump Is a Curveball in Long Arc of U.S.-China Ties
BUSINESS

Praxair Approaches Linde About Resuming Deal Talks

Samsung Tries to Appease Investors But Delays Big Changes
MARKETS

Oil Soars on OPEC-Deal Optimism

Monte dei Paschi’s Future Hangs on Sunday Vote
NUMBER OF THE DAY
5.2%
The increase in after-tax earnings across U.S. corporations in the third quarter from a year earlier. Gross domestic product expanded at an inflation- and seasonally adjusted annual rate of 3.2% in the third quarter, the strongest growth in two years.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
It’s like the whole city has died...The city is paralyzed.
Nemésio Carlos da Silva, the planning director of Chapecó, Brazil, on the city mourning the loss of its beloved soccer team. A plane carrying the Chapecoense soccer team crashed in Colombia on Monday night, killing at least 71 of the people on board.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Going back to our story above, what are your thoughts on Mr. Trump’s latest picks for his cabinet? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Margaret Rawson
READER RESPONSE
Responding to yesterday’s question on Beijing’s new ‘social credit’ system, Melissa Sweere of Texas wrote: “I couldn’t help but think to the recent show on Netflix called ‘Black Mirror’ with an episode named ‘Nosedive.’ In the episode, members of society rate one another in a way very similar to the social credit system. This show was meant to be Twilight Zone-esque, not real life. To think we have come this far to control a population by instituting a social credit may seem crazy, but I fear it is the future of society.” Jakub Mleczko of New York said: “George Orwell predicted many decades ago that technology would play a critical role in the implementation of the modern totalitarian state. Having achieved the digital means to control their population, it’s only fitting that the Chinese are now testing a variety of models to maintain their grip on power under the guise of ‘social credit scoring.’ My bet is that they’ll be successful, as the Chinese Communist party has repeatedly shown an ability to toe the line of oppression without sparking all-out rebellion from its populace.”And Jim Farrell of Pennsylvania commented: “It appears President Xi Jinping has taken a page from the once-daunting, but now humorous, threats of American high school vice principals & disciplinarians–‘this one is going on your permanent record!’”

This daily briefing is named "The 10-Point" after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary "What's News" digest of top stories. Technically, "10-point" referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.

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