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The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning,
In the spirit of the season, we at the Journal wish all of our readers a happy and peaceful holiday. In observance of Christmas, there will be no 10-Point on Monday. We will resume on Tuesday.
Shootout in Milan
The man suspected of carrying out the truck attack on a Christmas market in Berlin has been killed in a shootout in Milan, an Italian official said. Anis Amri was stopped by police during a routine check at about 3 a.m. and started shooting. The police returned fire, killing him. We report that the path the 24-year-old Tunisian took to Europe has laid bare multiple failings in the continent’s security apparatus, including poor cooperation between governments, porous borders and lack of biometric data to identify people who use false identities. The rise of Islamic State and Germany’s decision to throw open the door to refugees has left security services overwhelmed as they try to track threats among new arrivals. Overtaxed security agencies dropped 24-hour surveillance of Mr. Amri this year when they failed to find enough evidence to make him a high-priority target.

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Billions More
The Obama administration scrambled to resolve its remaining crisis-era megabank mortgage cases, striking multibillion-dollar settlements with Deutsche Bank and Credit Suisse over toxic securities while separately filing a lawsuit against Barclays alleging more than $30 billion in fraud-tainted sales. U.S. authorities settled with Deutsche Bank for $7.2 billion Thursday. Early Friday, Credit Suisse said it had agreed to pay about $5.3 billion to close the matter. The dramatic back-to-back announcements show the urgency among senior Obama appointees in the Justice Department to resolve the outstanding probes of precrisis conduct at major banks before those officials leave office in mid-January amid uncertainty about whether Donald Trump’s administration will show any interest in pursuing the cases. Deutsche Bank and Credit Suisse shares rose 4% and 2%, respectively, on Friday morning. Shares in Barclays dropped less than 1% as investors digested the potential uncertainty of a protracted legal battle with the Justice Department.
The Price Is Right
President-elect Trump’s pick to run the Health and Human Services Department traded more than $300,000 in shares of health-related companies over the past four years while sponsoring and advocating legislation that potentially could affect those companies’ stocks. We report that Tom Price, a Georgia Republican, bought and sold stock in about 40 health-care, pharmaceutical and biomedical companies since 2012, including a dozen in the current congressional session. In the same two-year period, he has sponsored nine and co-sponsored 35 health-related bills in the House. His stock trades are likely to be a significant issue during his Senate confirmation hearings. Ethics lawyers in both parties have advised lawmakers against trading even if it is legal. Meanwhile, Mr. Trump on Thursday rounded out his senior White House team and said in a cryptic tweet that he supports an expansion of U.S. nuclear-weapon capabilities.
Unbranded for Life
A branding backlash has some people working hard to remove logos and names from their clothes and accessories. In the 1990s and 2000s, consumers flashed brand names with pride. Some shoppers now shun such uniformity and prefer unlabeled clothing, which has prompted a few logo-heavy brands to shift course. Blogs and online discussion forums offer tips on scratching off the Ray-Ban logo from lenses, peeling away the Ralph Lauren emblem from new pairs of leather shoes and using a felt-tip marker to hide the Under Armour symbol on sports gear. “Why would I do someone else’s advertising for free?” says one man who used a scalpel to remove the Lacoste crocodile logo from his shirts.
Breaking on WSJ.com
A suspected hijacker of an Afriqiyah Airways airliner with 111 passengers aboard has threatened to blow up the plane on the runway at the international airport in Malta, a person familiar with the matter said. The airliner, a Airbus A320, landed at Malta’s Luqa airport at 1030 GMT, according to Flightradar24.
TODAY'S VIDEO
Working from Home
That Was Painless
As school assignments go digital, more parents are building dedicated, gadget-friendly spaces where they can monitor children’s activities.
TOP STORIES
U.S.

U.S. Economy Approaches Year’s End on Lackluster Note

Tank Car Maker Controlled by Carl Icahn Suing Railroad Regulators
WORLD

Syrian Army Says Government Has Full Control of Aleppo

Violence Bolsters Erdogan’s Plan for More Presidential Power in Turkey
BUSINESS

Anglo American Rethinks Sale Plan as Commodity Prices Rise

Multibillion-Dollar Jet Deals With Iran Will Test Trump Policy
MARKETS

Platinum Partners Fraud Case Has Investigators Casting Wide Net

Skull and Crossbones Alert: Don’t Mix Politics and Trading
NUMBER OF THE DAY
56%
The increase in homicides in Chicago in 2016 compared with 2015, as of mid-December. Homicides rose in most big American cities this year, continuing a worrisome trend that began last year, even as murder rates in most cities are nowhere near the levels of two decades ago.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
[It’s] like trying to make Ray’s brain into a computer.
An employee at Bridgewater, the world’s largest hedge fund, on the firm’s goal to create technology that would automate most of its management, enshrining founder Ray Dalio’s unorthodox approach in a software system. At Bridgewater, most meetings are recorded, employees are expected to criticize one another continually and personal performance is assessed on a host of data points.
TODAY'S QUESTION
What are your thoughts on Mr. Dalio’s management techniques at Bridgewater? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Margaret Rawson
READER RESPONSE
Responding to yesterday’s question on the rising percentage of young Americans living with their parents, Randy Bates of North Carolina said: “It’s hard to know if young people living with parents is an economic decision based on the job market or a continuation of the adolescent attitudes millennials have toward work and growing up.” Sarah Chung of California wrote: “As a young American, I must say that we don’t really have a choice with the lack of jobs out there, massive student debts and ridiculous rent prices. We need help with at least one of these aspects, and living at home seems to be the most straightforward solution.” And Robert Franklin of New York shared: “My parents were part of the Greatest Generation, teenagers during the Depression and veterans of World War II. That generation lived with their parents until married. My generation moved out as soon as possible. That generation knew family values. My generation trashed them. Will the millennials living in the basement return to family values? I doubt it. Karma in action.”

This daily briefing is named "The 10-Point" after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary "What's News" digest of top stories. Technically, "10-point" referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.

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