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The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning,
Rule Rollback
President Trump plans Friday to sign an executive action to scale back the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial-overhaul law, on the way to dismantling much of the regulatory system put in place after the financial crisis. Another planned executive action would seek to rescind a rule—scheduled to take effect in April—requiring retirement advisers, who oversee about $3 trillion in assets, to act in the best interest of their clients. White House National Economic Council Director Gary Cohn said the actions pave the way for additional orders on the postcrisis Financial Stability Oversight Council, the mechanism for winding down faltering financial giants and supervision of big financial firms that aren’t traditional banks. Outside the world of financial regulation, a draft executive order circulating in the administration, but which may never reach Mr. Trump’s desk, would dramatically expand legal exemptions on the grounds of religious beliefs.

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Tough With Tehran
The Trump administration is set to impose fresh sanctions on dozens of Iranian companies, individuals and military organizations for their alleged role in missile development and terrorism, according to people close to the deliberations. The penalties could be announced as early as Friday, two days after the White House put Iran “on notice” for its recent ballistic-missile tests and support for militant groups in Syria, Yemen and Iraq. Mr. Trump campaigned on taking a tough line on Iran, and his administration is reviewing the terms of the nuclear agreement the U.S. and five other nations reached with Tehran in 2015. Iran’s government has repeatedly warned it will view any new sanctions as a violation of that deal.
IPO Selfie
Snap has lifted the veil on its highly anticipated initial public offering, revealing a business that is growing at a torrid clip but faces challenges keeping users engaged, attracting new ones—and justifying a valuation that could reach $25 billion. The five-year-old parent of the popular Snapchat disappearing-message app publicly filed Thursday for a share sale that may come as soon as the first week of March. The IPO could be the biggest in more than two years in a moribund U.S. new-issue market, and will be particularly lucrative for two Silicon Valley venture funds. Among the revelations: Snap’s revenue last year was more than six times that of the year before, at $404.5 million—as advertisers flocked to an audience that grew to 158 million daily users in the fourth quarter—while its net loss swelled 38% to $514.6 million.
Groundswell
This year’s Super Bowl will demonstrate yet again how passing has come to dominate the NFL, but the revolution on display Sunday won’t involve Atlanta quarterback Matt Ryan, the league’s most efficient, or his New England counterpart Tom Brady, chasing a fifth title. It is happening, of all places, in the running game. We take a look at how the Falcons and Patriots have tailored theirs to fit the modern NFL, with devastating results. We also look at the personal brands of the Super Bowl’s biggest stars, the special treatment awaiting VIP attendees and the “snackadiums” created by dedicated fans watching at home. And columnist Jason Gay asks why Super Bowl rings look so ridiculous. You can vote for the best Super Bowl ads here.
TODAY'S VIDEO
The Quail Belt
That Was Painless
The expense of maintaining enormous quail-hunting plantations—many held for generations—is leading some owners to sell or donate large swaths of timberland for conservation.
TOP STORIES
U.S.

Skilled Workers Are Scarce in Tight Labor Market

Republicans Weigh Moves to Bolster Health Law
WORLD

Knife-Wielding Man Attacks Soldier Near Louvre Museum in Paris

Israeli Settlements ‘May Not Be Helpful’ for Middle East Peace, Trump Administration Says
BUSINESS

Ralph Lauren CEO Stefan Larsson Quits After Dispute With Founder Over Creative Control

For Many Firms, Trump Dominates Earnings Calls
MARKETS

The Confused, Mixed-Up World of Donald Trump’s Weaker Dollar

Fintech Startups Want to Save One Key Page of Dodd-Frank
NUMBER OF THE DAY
55%
The jump in Amazon’s fourth-quarter profit, to $749 million, beating company guidance—though revenue, up 22% to $43.7 billion, was just at the midpoint of Amazon’s target, and below analysts’ expectations.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
I haven’t yet met a CEO who’s not surprised by how many people who touch their products aren’t their own employees.
Carl Camden, president and CEO of staffing agency Kelly Services, on the outsourcing wave at companies across the U.S. and in almost every industry. We report that never before have American companies tried so hard to employ so few people.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Going back to our story above, what are your thoughts on Dodd-Frank? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Margaret Rawson
READER RESPONSE
Responding to yesterday’s question on the White House statement on Iran, Mary Thompson of New Mexico said: “I was so pleased that someone with backbone is steering the ship. We’ve been set up for failure with ‘red lines’ and ‘strong words.’ That type of nonaction encourages bad actors to act without worry. The administration shouldn’t have to do this very often to send a wake-up call.” Alan Dechovitz of South Carolina wrote: “Act. Don’t Act. There is no ‘notice’ in such matters, any more than there are red lines. In a week of foolishness internationally, this was the cherry on the excrement. I thought I voted for adults to run the country for a change.” And Charlie Van Pelt of Florida commented: “Mr. Trump’s advisers say they have their Iran response all planned out but, given his recent crude phone-call attempts at intimidation of our allies and the immigration-ban debacle, one may be pardoned for doubting if the execution will be any better.”

This daily briefing is named “The 10-Point” after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary “What's News” digest of top stories. Technically, “10-point” referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.

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