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The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning,
The New Diplomacy
President Trump threatened Tuesday to annihilate North Korea if the U.S. has to defend itself or its allies against the Pyongyang regime. In his first address to the U.N. General Assembly, Mr. Trump began by espousing international cooperation based on nationalism before weighing in on some of the world’s most intractable problems—using unusually blunt language for a U.N. speech. First up was North Korea: “‘Rocket Man’ is on a suicide mission, not only for himself but for his regime,” he said, using a nickname he had coined for leader Kim Jong Un. Mr. Trump also excoriated Iran and called a nuclear-disarmament deal with Tehran negotiated by his predecessor, Barack Obama, “an embarrassment” to the U.S. The speech drew a mixed reaction from delegates. Israel, a close U.S. ally, applauded Mr. Trump’s comments on Iran, while others called his North Korea remarks an alarming declaration of war.

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Tragedy in Mexico
Soldiers, rescue workers and volunteers worked late into the night Tuesday searching the rubble left by a 7.1 magnitude earthquake that collapsed scores of buildings in Mexico City and surrounding states. The Mexican Civil Defense Agency said early Wednesday that at least 217 people had died, more than half of them in the city. Centered just 60 miles south of the capital, the earthquake struck on the anniversary of a 1985 quake that devastated the city and killed thousands, and less than two weeks after a huge quake struck Mexico’s south. Officials said the death toll was sure to rise, given the number of collapsed buildings. Messages seeking information on missing colleagues, friends and loved ones flooded social media.
The Spy at Work
When Medrobotics CEO Samuel Straface saw a stranger alone in a conference room as he left the medical-technology startup one recent evening, he almost kept walking. Instead, feeling uneasy, he turned back and questioned the man—setting off the latest economic-espionage case alleging attempted theft of trade secrets from a U.S. company. The after-hours visitor was later identified as Dong Liu, a dual citizen of China and Canada. Mr. Liu is in federal custody, charged with attempting to steal trade secrets and gain unauthorized access to the company’s computer system. We report there is a boom in federal prosecutions alleging theft or attempted theft of trade secrets from U.S. companies or companies with American operations. Many of the cases have a China connection.
Virtual Workouts, Real Sweat
Virtual reality is starting to tiptoe into the $27.6 billion health-club industry, with a new generation of VR games simulating tennis, boxing, swordplay and even scuba diving. Though it is costly, some clubs are carving out floor space for VR, while others are bringing in new fitness machines that support the technology. Gyms have long offered digital entertainment—from TV screens mounted on workout machines to movie-theater-like spaces for large groups—as a distraction from the monotony and rigor of exercise, but some fitness gurus and academics say virtual reality does a better job. “It’s definitely the future of cardio,” says one devotee. Watch our video to see how a real-life tennis workout compares with a virtual one.
TODAY'S VIDEO
Don’t Settle for the Middle
That Was Painless
With its wireless charging, upgraded camera and faster processor, the iPhone 8 is the best model…to avoid, writes Personal Tech columnist Geoffrey A. Fowler after putting Apple’s latest to the test against the less-expensive iPhone 7. Personal Tech columnist Joanna Stern, meanwhile, offers tips for making the most of the new iOS 11.
TOP STORIES
U.S.

Hurricane Maria Batters Dominica, With Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico Up Next

Latest Push for a Health-Law Repeal Picks Up Speed in the Senate
WORLD

China Rushes to Surpass U.S. in Decoding Citizens’ Genes

Russia and Belarus Hold Joint Drills, and Tensions Emerge
BUSINESS

The North Sea Is Suddenly, Surprisingly, an Oil Hot Spot

Cost Of Employer-Provided Health Insurance Rises Toward $19,000 a Year
MARKETS

Heavy Debt Crushed Owners of Toys ‘R’ Us

Upheaval at the Top of Guggenheim, as SEC Scrutinizes Investment Powerhouse
NUMBER OF THE DAY
8.1%
The investment return for Harvard University’s endowment in the latest year, another disappointing performance for the world’s richest school.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
If antifa had not been there, we could have been trampled.
Pastor Seth Wispelwey, who said he and a group of clergy were attacked when they tried to block white supremacists at last month’s rally in Charlottesville, Va.—and were saved only because protesters he identified as antifa, short for “antifascist,” stepped in and fought back. We explore how antifa violence is creating a rift among liberals over a radical fringe whose objectives, if not methods, they often share.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Going back to our story above, what are your thoughts on antifa tactics? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Margaret Rawson
READER RESPONSE
Responding to yesterday’s question on Mr. Trump’s address to the U.N. General Assembly, Victoria A. Reider of Pennsylvania wrote: “Mr. Trump courageously said what needed to be said for a long time by the U.S. to the U.N. General Assembly. Kudos, Mr. President!” But Hoagland of Virginia opined: “Mr. Trump is a global embarrassment.” And Rich Irwin of Ohio commented: “I think Mr. Trump’s message of respecting nations in their individuality and asking them to cooperate is going back to the original understanding of the U.N. This stands in stark contrast to the idea of the U.N. being a way station to a one-world government.”

This daily briefing is named “The 10-Point” after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary “What’s News” digest of top stories. Technically, “10-point” referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.

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