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The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning,
The Dream Lives On
Congressional Democrats said Wednesday they were closing in on a deal with President Trump to give legal status to undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children, often dubbed “Dreamers.” However, Mr. Trump on Thursday morning tweeted that no deal had been reached. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said in a joint statement that they had agreed with Mr. Trump on the outlines of a deal over dinner at the White House on Wednesday. A separate White House statement called the meeting “constructive,” but White House officials later disputed that an agreement had been reached. Early Thursday, Mr. Trump wrote in a tweet that “massive border security would have to be agreed to in exchange for consent.” In recent days both sides appeared to be edging toward the formulation that the Democratic leaders outlined, with Democrats agreeing to include border-security measures and the White House signaling it would accept the immigrant protections without insisting that the legislation also include funding for the southwest border-wall package. The potential deal is another indication of a newfound comity between Mr. Trump and congressional Democrats, following last week’s debt-ceiling raise. Meanwhile, Mr. Trump said Wednesday the emerging Republican tax proposal wouldn’t cut taxes for the wealthy—comments that appeared to contradict the plan being drafted by his administration and GOP leaders.

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Hot Chips
A group including Apple and Dell has surged to the front of a hotly contested race to acquire Toshiba’s memory-chip business, a crucial supplier to some of the world’s biggest makers of electronic gear. Toshiba said Wednesday it had signed a nonbinding agreement with group’s leader, private-equity firm Bain Capital, and intends to reach a deal by the end of September. We report the group’s bid values the business at about $19 billion. The development is the latest twist in the process to sell the profitable memory unit, one that has pitted three major bidders against each other and exposed a rift between Toshiba and an important partner, Western Digital, which is among those vying for the business. At stake is control over a critical building block in a variety of products, from smartphones to heavy-duty computing machines.
Intrigue in the House of Saud
We report that Saudi Arabia is stamping out traces of internal dissent in a far-reaching campaign targeting influential clerics, liberal thinkers and even princes as Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman moves to consolidate power ahead of his expected accession to the throne. In the past week, Saudi authorities have detained more than 30 people, roughly half of them clerics. The campaign goes beyond many of the government’s past clampdowns. Most of the people detained in the past week have two things in common: They have a large social-media following and haven’t supported the Saudi government in its monthslong dispute with neighboring Qatar. Many are close to Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood movement. King Salman is planning to abdicate in his son’s favor, according to people close to the royal court, but the timing is unclear.
Gate Check
The past decade has seen airlines fall in love with fees. Now there’s a new snag at the airport catching travelers by surprise: the gate-service fee. It was created by United and American to discourage passengers who buy their cheapest fare, basic economy, from bringing a carry-on bag that doesn’t fit under the seat. When you fly basic economy on those two airlines, you lack privileges to put a bag in an overhead bin unless you have elite status or a qualifying credit card. But if you don’t figure that out before boarding or try to sneak a bag on anyway, United and American will hit you with an additional $25 fee on top of the standard fee they charge to check the bag at the gate.
TODAY'S VIDEO
The Taste of ‘Essence’
That Was Painless
Sales of LaCroix sparkling water are booming but fans don’t have a clue as to what gives the beverages their flavor, or “essence.” We conducted a blind taste test of four flavors to see if we could guess each one.
TOP STORIES
U.S.

Senate Backpedals on Bipartisan Approach to Health Law

Flynn Promoted Nuclear-Plant Project While in White House
WORLD

Curfews, Obligatory Prayers, Whippings: Hard-Line Islam Emerges in Indonesia

U.N. Security Council Calls on Myanmar Military to Halt Campaign
BUSINESS

Tenet Healthcare Is Exploring Options Including Possible Sale of Company

Can Apple Unlock Promise of Facial Recognition?
MARKETS

Equifax Blames Exploited Web-Server Software for Data Breach

An Inflation Surprise Could Leave Bond Investors Aching
NUMBER OF THE DAY
$211 billion
The value of assets managed by a money-market fund created by an affiliate of Chinese technology titan Alibaba Group. In just four years, the fund, known as Yu’e Bao—which means “leftover treasure”—has grown rapidly to more than twice the size of the next largest money-market fund.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
My mom died under the care of staff that were supposed to be there to protect her…I lost my mom and didn’t get to say goodbye in a proper manner.
Jeff Nova on his mother Gail, one of eight nursing home patients who died in Hollywood, Fla., in sweltering conditions after Hurricane Irma knocked out the air conditioning. More than 150 other patients had to be evacuated. The events prompted Florida Gov. Rick Scott to order a state health agency to issue an immediate moratorium preventing the facility from admitting new patients.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Going back to our story above, what are your thoughts on the immigration agreement taking shape between Democrats and President Trump? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Margaret Rawson
READER RESPONSE
Responding to yesterday’s question on Apple’s newest offerings, Stewart D. Cumming of California said: “I am disturbed by the relatively little, if any, coverage there is concerning the expected lifespan for these devices. If Apple and others want to command these types of prices for their devices, one should be able to expect that they will get something that will last for more than just a couple of years before it becomes obsolete. Another way to put this, I guess, is to ask how often Apple and others expect us to reach into our pocketbooks and pay four figures for a new phone?” Bob MacLeod of Florida wrote: “When free-market factors pushed gasoline up to $4/gallon, oil profits soared, consumers were outraged, ‘Big Oil’ executives were vilified by the media and dragged to testify before Congress. Apple’s iPhone X is the $4/gallon phone. Apple is the most valuable company, pocketing more profit than any company in history. Yet these same consumers line up to buy the phones, knowing hundreds of dollars each is going to profits. Where’s the outrage? Why isn’t Tim Cook adjusting his tie and wiping his brow in front of a congressional panel?” And John Rogers of Texas commented: “$1,000 for a cellphone. P.T. Barnum was right: There’s a sucker born every minute.”

This daily briefing is named "The 10-Point" after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary "What's News" digest of top stories. Technically, "10-point" referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.

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