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The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning,
Debt and Taxes
President Trump and GOP leaders published a basic outline of their ambitious tax-code overhaul Wednesday, sketching out a range of changes they said will boost economic growth and benefit middle-income families. While crucial details are left to Congress, the plan calls for cutting the corporate tax rate to 20% from 35% and the top rate on individuals to 35% from 39.6%, reducing the number of individual brackets and ending estate taxes. It also offers incentives for business investment. We look at the prospective winners and losers, offer some key takeaways and examine the plans’s prospects in a Congress that has had no notable legislative success this year. Columnist Greg Ip looks at the tenuous logic behind Republicans’ politically convenient argument that this tax cut won’t raise the federal debt much, if at all. Questions about the proposal? Send them to 10point@wsj.com; our tax experts, Laura Saunders and Rich Rubin, will answer some on WSJ.com.

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The Pepsi Challenge
Federal securities regulators are investigating an allegation by PepsiCo’s former top lawyer that she was fired because a probe she oversaw rankled others at the company—a violation of the SEC’s whistleblower rules. Maura Smith, general counsel from May 2011 to June 2012, supervised outside lawyers hired by PepsiCo to dig into business practices at Wimm-Bill-Dann, a big Russian maker of dairy products and juices that the company had bought for about $5 billion. Ms. Smith, now in private practice, was subpoenaed this year by the SEC and met with government lawyers as part of an agency investigation into whether employment contracts at major U.S. companies discourage employees from reporting wrongdoing.
Full Coverage
Health insurers appeared likely to offer Affordable Care Act plans in all U.S. counties next year, after months of drama and worries about last-minute exits ahead of a late-Wednesday deadline. Some major insurers that had signaled possible pullbacks, including Cigna, Health Care Service, Molina Healthcare, Highmark Health and Independence Blue Cross, this week said they would stick to the states and regions where they had filed to offer ACA coverage—though roughly 50% of counties appeared likely to have just one exchange insurer, and 30% just two. To woo and keep insurers, state officials spent months negotiating, in many cases approving substantial rate increases. Meanwhile, Republicans have a new promise on their health-care push: Wait till next year.
Benched
Hall-of-Fame basketball coach Rick Pitino was ousted by Louisville Wednesday, one day after federal prosecutors unsealed corruption allegations implicating his storied program. The school said he had been placed on administrative leave—along with Athletic Director Tom Jurich—but the coach’s attorney said he was “effectively fired.” It is the first major repercussion from a scandal that has already begun to roil the billion-dollar college-sports industry, after a yearslong probe by federal authorities resulted in 10 arrests on Tuesday and revealed what prosecutors called “the dark underbelly of college basketball.” But some question whether the alleged activity violates federal law.
TODAY'S VIDEO
Say Cheese
That Was Painless
Light’s pocket-size L16 replaces one big lens with 16 small ones, plus some supersmart software. Our Personal Tech columnist Geoffrey A. Fowler asks, Is this the future of photography?
TOP STORIES
U.S.

Colleges Rethink Remedial Education to Get Students on Course to Graduation

Political Disruption Helps Fuel GOP’s Woes
WORLD

Canada Says It’s No Safe Haven for Immigrants Losing U.S. Protection

Malaysia Bans Its Citizens From Traveling to North Korea
BUSINESS

Toshiba Signs $17.7 Billion Deal With Bain-Apple Group to Sell Chip Unit

Apple Is Interested in Japan Display’s LCDs for Some iPhones
MARKETS

Carlyle Group in Talks to Sell TCW Group Stake

Dollar Jumps on Expectations for Higher U.S. Interest Rates
NUMBER OF THE DAY
91
The age at which Playboy magazine founder Hugh Hefner, who helped usher in the sexual revolution, died Wednesday.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
If you drive through the neighborhood, you see boxes on everybody’s step.
Marcia Tinker, a longtime manager at the now-closed Macy’s in Elmira, N.Y., on rising online sales there. The city and its surrounding county, famed for a trailblazing mall, are more exposed to this year’s brick-and-mortar carnage than almost any other area in the U.S.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Going back to our story above, what are your thoughts and questions on the GOP tax proposals? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Margaret Rawson
READER RESPONSE
Responding to yesterday’s question on Saudi Arabia’s lifting its ban on women driving, Anita Giani of Mississippi commented: “About time!” Bruce Bowers of California said: “It’s ironic that Saudi Arabia is allowing women to drive just when self-driving cars are being developed to take the steering wheel out of people’s hands.” Augusta Era Golian of Texas wrote: “It is certainly about time that Saudi Arabia moves into the modern cultural world, but they need to do much more than letting women drive.” And Julia Houston of Louisiana weighed in: “It is an actual step forward. Is there any chance we don’t have to watch them take two steps back?”

This daily briefing is named “The 10-Point” after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary “What’s News” digest of top stories. Technically, “10-point” referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.

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