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The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning,
Insurance Plans
The Senate this week will grapple with President Trump’s decision to stop making subsidy payments to health insurers, with lawmakers seeking a deal that would keep the money flowing while Republicans try to fold in conservative-oriented health-care priorities. Whether a package can emerge with support from a critical mass of senators and House Republicans likely will be put to the test quickly: Sens. Lamar Alexander, a Republican, and Patty Murray, a Democrat, are expected to introduce a plan within days, while GOP Sen. Ron Johnson unveils his own, more-conservative-leaning version. Insurers, meanwhile, are pressing some state and federal officials to let them reset their rates for 2018 in light of the halted subsidies. Oregon already has told insurers to jack up rates for their most popular plans. We report that Mr. Trump also is looking to advance his proposed tax overhaul this week.

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Leaders of the world’s largest central banks now indicate that weak inflation in advanced economies could prolong the postcrisis era of easy-money policies. Many central bankers are tiptoeing toward scaling back their efforts to boost growth. Despite a broad-based improvement in the global economy, wages and consumer prices remain stubbornly low, making officials wary of removing their stimulus measures too quickly. Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen said she expected the U.S. central bank to continue slowly raising short-term rates, but she expressed caution about how weak inflation might affect that path. Officials from the European Central Bank and the Bank of Japan expressed similar concerns. Officials also continue to keep a close eye on the selection of the next Fed chief.
Allies at War
Iraqi forces clashed with fighters from the Kurdish semiautonomous region in the oil-rich province of Kirkuk early Monday, raising the stakes in a standoff over Kurdish independence. Before dawn, units from Iraq’s Shiite-majority Popular Mobilization Forces as well as elite Iraqi military units moved toward Kirkuk on the orders of Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi. Kurdish Peshmerga troops reacted to the advances, provoking clashes before sunrise. The skirmishes follow a referendum in which the Kurds voted overwhelmingly in favor of independence, defying Baghdad, regional powers and the U.S., which warned it would distract from the final battles to defeat Islamic State.
The Millionaire Next Door
Blackstone Group, which has become a Wall Street juggernaut by catering to institutions and the ultrarich, is targeting investors with $5 million or less for its next leg of growth. The private-equity firm is pushing aggressively into products for retail investors, betting it can raise as much from them over the long term as it does from the pension funds and other institutions that form the main source of its $371 billion of assets. The logic is simple: There were 7½ times more U.S. households with $1 million to $5 million in assets at the end of 2016 than there were households with $5 million to $25 million. Blackstone’s effort has the potential to significantly bolster management fees, which Wall Street values more highly than profits from investments because they are more dependable.
Batteries Included
In the near future, your home could be battery-operated. This is especially true if you live in New York, California, Massachusetts, Hawaii, Vermont, Arizona or a growing roster of other states and municipalities experimenting with revamping their electrical grids for the 21st century. You might not even know your lights are being kept on by the same chemical process that powers your smartphone, since the batteries could be tucked into what looks like a neighborhood junction box, or behind a fence in a substation. Thanks to efforts by startups and utility companies, you might even get one right inside your home. The adoption of these home batteries is being driven by a powerful need, writes Keywords columnist Christopher Mims: renewable energy.
TODAY'S VIDEO
Compliance Issues
That Was Painless
Iran reached a historic agreement with major world powers over its nuclear program in 2015. Niki Blasina explains what Tehran gave up under the deal and how it is benefiting. At the weekend, U.S. officials defended President Trump’s refusal to certify the agreement, while European governments expressed their support for continuing the deal.
TOP STORIES
U.S.

Nafta Demise Emerges as a New Risk for Investors

Dianne Feinstein Faces Challenge From Within Party
WORLD

Freed Family Tries to Rebuild Life as Dark Details Emerge About Ordeal

Maduro’s Government Wins Majority of Gubernatorial Races, Electoral Council Says
BUSINESS

Fallout Grows for Harvey Weinstein

Aramark to Buy Avendra and AmeriPride in Separate Deals
MARKETS

Pentagon Turns to High-Speed Traders to Fortify Markets Against Cyberattack

PayPal’s Market Value Eclipses AmEx, Nears Morgan Stanley, Goldman
NUMBER OF THE DAY
300
The minimum estimated death toll from twin bombings in Somalia’s capital Mogadishu on Saturday, one of the deadliest attacks in the country since an Islamist insurgency started there a decade ago.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
Why are we the only ones going this direction? Are we digging our own grave?
Eli Monroe, 34, on choosing a route to escape the deadliest wildfires in California history. We chronicle how the fires, which have left more than 40 people dead, have forced thousands to make similar, split-second decisions. Officials said Sunday that easing winds would help firefighters.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Returning to our story above, what are your thoughts on Blackstone’s new strategy? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Margaret Rawson
READER RESPONSE
Responding to Friday’s question on President Trump’s executive order on health care, Steve Shannon of New Jersey said: “The president’s executive order relating to the Affordable Care Act will certainly force the issue of repair versus repeal and replace to the head of the line for next year’s midterm elections. A fairly large game of chicken, with life-or-death consequences, is about to begin.” Frank Janecek of Alabama commented: “I think it is about time the president stepped into the ring. When Congress won’t act, he must.” And Garrett McDaniel of Pennsylvania wrote: “The American people and their elected representatives have stated multiple times—and very clearly—their desire to have the benefits of the ACA made available to them. Mr. Trump, however, chooses to ignore this plainly stated preference in defiance of that desire by the majority. His actions are spiteful, hurtful and wrong.”

This daily briefing is named “The 10-Point” after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary “What's News” digest of top stories. Technically, “10-point” referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.

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