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The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning,
Terror in New York
Eight people were killed and at least a dozen injured on Tuesday when a suspected terrorist driving a truck ran down pedestrians and cyclists on a lower Manhattan bike path—the deadliest attack in New York City since Sept. 11, 2001. The driver shouted “Allahu akbar” as he got out of the truck brandishing what were later identified as a paintball gun and pellet gun, said police, who shot him in the abdomen. Identified by officials as Sayfullo Saipov, a 29-year-old who came to the U.S. in 2010 and is originally from Uzbekistan, he is in custody at a local hospital. A law-enforcement official said police found handwritten notes near the truck saying the suspect carried out the attack in the name of Islamic State. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said there was no evidence of a wider plot.

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A New Tax Bill
The House Republican tax plan will preserve a top individual tax rate of 39.6%, a retreat for the party on an issue of intense debate in Washington: How a tax overhaul will treat the most affluent. Republicans last year discussed a top rate of 33%, and earlier this year lifted it to 35%. The plan drops the corporate tax rate to 20%, and it delays a planned repeal of the estate tax. House Republicans have delayed the plan’s release to Thursday from Wednesday to finish technical work, circulate ideas among members and address thorny issues such as deductions for state and local taxes.
The Future of Money
Bitcoin is moving from the margins of the financial world closer to its center. The world’s biggest exchange group, CME Group, said Tuesday it aims to launch a bitcoin-based futures contract this year, assuming regulatory approval. That would be a big step forward in the evolution of the digital currency, enabling Wall Street banks and trading firms to protect themselves against bitcoin price swings and perhaps providing retail investors with an easier way to trade it. Bitcoin supporters say the virtual currency is gaining respectability, and CME’s plan offers a financial giant’s stamp of approval—a risk for the exchange, which could face embarrassment if the market implodes.
Caveat Emptor
Criminals have sold illegal goods online for years. But the growth of social networks and e-commerce platforms, coupled with the recent industrial-scale looting by Islamic State across the Middle East, has brought a stream of stolen antiquities flowing through the likes of Facebook, eBay and Amazon, often offered to unsuspecting buyers. It is a vexing challenge for law-enforcement officials trying to save heritage sites from being stripped of ancient artifacts. Every day there are at least 100,000 antiquities—valued at over $10 million—for sale online, and authorities estimate up to 80% have no legal provenance. Revenue from the sales often finances terrorist and criminal groups that also use the trade to launder income from other illicit activities, including drug and weapons trafficking.
TODAY'S VIDEO
Face Value
That Was Painless
The No. 1 new feature on the iPhone X is its facial-recognition system. Joanna Stern put it to the test with masks, costumes and identical triplets.
TOP STORIES
U.S.

Disclosure of Papadopoulos’s Email Hunt Sheds Light on Quest for Clinton ‘Dirt’

Two Months After Harvey, Houston Continues to Count the Cost
WORLD

Catalonia’s Former Leader Says He Will Respect Election Results

South Korean Leader Warns Against Attack on North, Ahead of Trump’s Asia Trip
BUSINESS

Tesla Faces Labor Discord as It Ramps Up Model 3 Production

Sony’s Rebooted Robot Dog Will Fetch Ruffly $1,700
MARKETS

Aetna Posts Revenue Decline, Doesn’t Comment on CVS Report

Chinese Property Shopping Spree Fades as Beijing Hits the Brakes
NUMBER OF THE DAY
4.3%
The Dow Jones Industrial Average’s October rise, exceeding both the S&P 500’s and the Nasdaq’s as a global economic pickup lifted blue-chip companies.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
It is criminal…I say it so that people understand why we need to have another kind of law in place to police this conduct.
Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota on tweets that falsely claimed people could “vote by text.” Senators on Tuesday pressed representatives from Facebook, Google and Twitter to explain their slowness in recognizing Russia-linked accounts; the officials struck a contrite tone about their services’ part in stoking political tensions during the 2016 campaign.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Going back to our story above, what are your thoughts on a potential futures contract for bitcoin? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Margaret Rawson
READER RESPONSE
Responding to yesterday’s question on the charges in the Russia probe, Alan Dechovitz of South Carolina wrote: “To quote Hillary Clinton, this whole Russia controversy is a ‘nothing burger.’ Democrats and Republicans need to get a grip and get back to doing the people’s business.” Gordon E. Finley of Florida said: “The arrest and plea bargain by George Papadopoulos kind of reminds me of a terrific book written some years ago by John Dean, titled ‘Blind Ambition.’” And Daniel Souza of Connecticut shared: “The most significant revelation is that the two charges and guilty plea are only a ‘small part’ of a far-reaching investigation, foretelling more indictments on a wider scope of activities, supposedly including the president’s financial dealings and tax filings. In the end this could make the Watergate scandal look like a walk in the park.”

This daily briefing is named “The 10-Point” after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary “What’s News” digest of top stories. Technically, “10-point” referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.

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