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The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning,
On the Offense
President Trump and his national-security team began laying the groundwork for a possible military strike against Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in response to a suspected chemical-weapons attack that killed dozens of civilians. As at least one U.S. guided-missile destroyer moved toward the Syrian coast, Mr. Trump said a quick decision is likely. Mr. Assad’s suspected use of chemical weapons on a rebel-held city Saturday would be the latest example of his calculus that the strategic gains from using poisonous gas to terrorize the population outweigh the damage from any Western retaliation. Local doctors said a possible combination of chlorine and nerve agents killed 43 people, many of them children.

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Attorney Privilege
FBI agents searched the office, home and hotel room of President Trump’s longtime lawyer Michael Cohen, seizing records including those related to Stormy Daniels, said a person familiar with the matter. Mr. Cohen paid the former adult-film actress $130,000 in October 2016 for agreeing not to discuss an alleged sexual encounter with Mr. Trump. Both the White House and Mr. Cohen have denied a sexual encounter took place. Monday’s raids, all in Manhattan, mark a significant escalation in prosecutors’ interest in Mr. Cohen, who has described himself as Mr. Trump’s “fix-it guy.” The searches are part of an investigation by the U.S. attorney’s office in Manhattan, coordinated with the office of special counsel Robert Mueller. The president called the raids a “disgrace” and a “witch hunt.” Asked whether he would fire Mr. Mueller, Mr. Trump said: “We’ll see what happens.”
Where the Movies Are
With the rise of streaming, theater attendance last year fell to its lowest level since 1995. That is spurring the industry’s biggest changes since the multiplex boom of the 1990s, when Hollywood responded to competition from VHS rentals by erecting cavernous auditoriums in the sprawling suburbs. Today, trying to draw customers who have evermore options at home, theaters are going upscale. Exhibitors are replacing seats with luxury recliners, offering high-end drinks and dining and installing high-tech screens that no home theater could replicate. With higher ticket prices and pricier menu items, the trend began in affluent neighborhoods but has since migrated to smaller communities where moviegoers treat the outing as a luxury.
Audio Performance
Podcasters are the new rock stars of the touring circuit. Podcasting was a niche industry only a few years ago, but with the most popular podcasts now drawing millions of steadfast listeners, hosts and producers are capitalizing by taking their audio shows on the road. The chance to cash in on the rapidly growing audience—some 48 million Americans tune in to podcasts every week, listening to seven shows on average—is persuading venues to book podcast stars they’ve never heard of. Talent agents are managing tours, with bookings where streaming and downloads are strongest, and working on film deals. For podcasters used to hunkering in their recording studios, live gigs open up a whole new world of show business—complete with groupies, after-show parties…and stage fright.
TODAY'S VIDEO
Tailor Made
That Was Painless
With style trends moving faster than ever, the fashion industry is experimenting with a business model some call “click, buy and make.” At Hong Kong-based womenswear boutique Isabella Wren, 3-D body scanners and proprietary algorithms allow customers to order perfectly fitting bespoke garments.
TOP STORIES
U.S.

Trump Acknowledges Farmers to Feel Impact From China Trade Actions

Test Scores Show Students Made Little Progress in National Exam
WORLD

China Installed Military Jamming Equipment on Spratly Islands, U.S. Says

Xi Vows Greater Access to China, Warns Against ‘Cold War Mentality’
BUSINESS

Deutsche Bank’s New CEO, a Risk Veteran, Warns of ‘Tough Decisions’

Jack Ma’s Ant Financial to Raise $9 Billion, Become World’s Biggest Unicorn
MARKETS

Floods, Strikes and Mudslides: Why American Retailers Are Paying More for Bananas but You Won’t

Saudi Arabia’s Tiny Exchange Prepares to Host World’s Biggest IPO
NUMBER OF THE DAY
6%
The rise in Monsanto’s shares after we reported that the Justice Department decided to allow Bayer’s acquisition of the St. Louis-based biotech-seed giant.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
We didn’t take a broad enough view of our responsibility, and that was a big mistake.
Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg, in prepared testimony to be given before Senate and House committees this week, on the company’s perceived role in influencing elections and spreading disinformation. While Facebook has taken steps to protect user data, recent issues will likely prompt questions from lawmakers on how to regulate social-media platforms.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Going back to our story above, what are your thoughts on the FBI’s raiding the home and office of President Trump’s lawyer? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Cynthia Lin
READER RESPONSE
Responding to yesterday’s question about President Trump’s rhetoric on Syria, Jim Ward of Massachusetts wrote: “A ‘big price’ to pay is similar to Obama’s ‘line in the sand’ comment. However, it gives Trump some needed wiggle room because it’s vague. What’s ‘big’? I think there will be a price to pay. Trump knows he must follow through.” Charles Dean of Minnesota weighs in: The president “clearly has boxed himself in, having just called for a complete withdrawal of troops, but now blundering toward full-throated military response.” Catherine Learoyd of Texas shared: “While I wouldn’t call any of Mr. Trump’s tweets ‘rhetoric’ as a persuasive art form, I’m pleasantly surprised that he finally called out Mr. Putin directly. Mr. Assad may have been emboldened when Mr. Trump said he wanted to pull troops out of Syria, which would gift the Middle East to Mr. Putin.”

This daily briefing is named “The 10-Point” after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary “What's News” digest of top stories. Technically, “10-point” referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.

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