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The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning,
Dial M for Merger
T-Mobile struck a $26 billion deal to buy Sprint—a combination that, if allowed by antitrust enforcers, would leave the U.S. wireless market dominated by three national players. The Journal reported earlier this month that the rivals had rekindled merger discussions, after two failed attempts to combine in the past four years. The last one collapsed in November in part over the reluctance of SoftBank founder Masayoshi Son to give up control of Sprint, which his company took over for $22 billion in 2013. A sale to T-Mobile would accelerate the Japanese billionaire’s turn away from what was once his core business, selling mobile-phone service. In other deals news, Marathon Petroleum, the second-largest refiner in the U.S., plans to buy pipeline and refining company Andeavor for more than $20 billion. And Walmart is to merge its British arm, Asda Group, with rival J Sainsbury, creating the U.K.’s largest grocer.

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Trust but Verify
Top U.S. officials expressed caution about North Korean leader Kim Jong Un’s pledge to shut down Pyongyang’s nuclear-test site, saying the dismantling of the weapons program must be “irreversible” and verifiable. The pledge, revealed by South Korea on Sunday—following Friday’s summit meeting between Mr. Kim and South Korean President Moon Jae-in—came ahead of a planned summit between Mr. Kim and President Trump. The Journal’s Jonathan Cheng writes that skeptics are getting a case of déjà vu. Much of the language in the declaration signed by the two leaders Friday echoes agreements reached at similar summits in 2000 and 2007, still unrealized.
The Mighty Dollar Is Back
The dollar is rallying after floundering for most of the past year, another sign that global growth momentum may be shifting back to the U.S. from other major economies. As economists grow more doubtful that Europe can keep up last year’s pace, signs of stronger U.S. economic growth and inflation are becoming a focus of financial markets, helping lift the dollar to its highest level since January. A rising dollar has broad implications for markets and the economy. While it can attract more foreign capital to U.S. bond markets, it can also bruise the earnings of U.S. multinationals by making their products less competitive abroad. But some see the dollar’s rebound as a bear-market rally—though even so, it could last for months—and think growth momentum will likely shift back to Europe in the coming months, spurring the European Central Bank and other central banks to continue normalizing monetary policy.
Let’s Stay Together
With numerous studies showing loneliness can negatively affect health, particularly among the elderly, health-care providers are taking steps to help them feel less alone, writes Journal reporter Sumathi Reddy. CareMore, a California-based subsidiary of Anthem that provides health care to 150,000 Medicare and Medicaid patients across the country, is screening its elderly patients and offering those deemed lonely a “togetherness” program. It is also remodeling clinics to make them more like community centers, and encouraging seniors to socialize even when not waiting for a medical appointment. Elsewhere, AARP Services is testing ways to combat loneliness, including animatronic pets that can imitate real cats and dogs.
TODAY'S VIDEO
Robots Need Managers, Too
That Was Painless
As machines get smarter, there is a persistent fear in the minds of economists, policy makers and, well, everybody: Millions of people will be left obsolete and jobless. Yes, jobs will be lost. But experts say the picture has a surprisingly bright silver lining.
TOP STORIES
U.S.

Pompeo Rails Against Iran During Middle East Tour

Use of Genealogy Data to Track Golden State Killer Raises Questions
WORLD

Deadly Blasts Hit Kabul

China Plans Trade Offers for U.S. Envoys on High-Stakes Trip
BUSINESS

In Europe, Amazon.com Remains Out of Fashion

DOJ’s Antitrust Case Against AT&T Merger Has Been a Slog
MARKETS

The Biggest Banks Are Gobbling Up Deposits. Here’s Who’s Not

Fed’s Interest-Rate Plans Come Under Pressure
NUMBER OF THE DAY
$630 million
The estimated global box-office take of “Avengers: Infinity War” during its debut weekend, smashing the $541 million record set by last year’s “The Fate of the Furious.”
QUOTE OF THE DAY
We will stay here until every single asylum seeker is taken.
Alex Mensing, a caravan organizer, on a group of nearly 200 Central American migrants seeking asylum at the U.S.-Mexico border.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Going back to our story above, what are your thoughts on a tie-up of T-Mobile and Sprint? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Jessica Menton
READER RESPONSE
Responding to Friday’s question on the meeting between North Korea and South Korea, Jane Park of South Korea weighed in: “While the peninsula brims with high hopes for the reunification between the North and South, it is unlikely that Kim Jong Un has any altruistic motives to end the armistice so quickly.…If President Trump and President Moon Jae-in manage to have Kim Jong Un relinquish his alliance with China, that alone would be a remarkable accomplishment which could ultimately lead to the reunification of two Koreas in future decades.” Russ Hagberg of Illinois shared: “The potential for a reunified Korea is real, and this is an impressive diplomatic achievement by the Trump administration.” And Ben Richmond of Washington, D.C., wrote: “The Trump administration should view this as a sign not to resort to military force if the upcoming negotiations do not end in the administration’s sought-after ‘denuclearization.’”

This daily briefing is named “The 10-Point” after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary “What’s News” digest of top stories. Technically, “10-point” referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.

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