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The 10-Point: My Guide to the Day's Top News

The Wall Street Journal
Good morning from Milwaukee, where Fox Business Network and The Wall Street Journal will be hosting the next GOP debate tomorrow and I will be one of the moderators.
Loan Losers
While relatively high junk credit ratings still attract buyers, loan investors have lost their appetite for risk. Wall Street banks are struggling to sell billions of dollars of loans they made to finance the corporate buyout boom. The slowdown threatens to cool the surge in mergers and acquisitions that has sent takeover volume in 2015 to record levels, thanks in part to easy credit. Investment banks are growing reluctant to back new deals with heavier debt loads or in troubled industries such as energy and pharmaceuticals. That in turn makes it harder for potential acquirers to capture takeover targets. Holding the loans until markets stabilize has become prohibitively expensive for banks because of high capital charges required under the Dodd-Frank law.
Confronting the Bear
Senior U.S. military leaders have proposed sending more forces into Europe on a rotating basis to build up the American presence, warning that the U.S. must not let Russia’s cooperation with the West in Syria distract from the conflict in Ukraine. The U.S. Army is refining its training to ensure the military is able to counter hybrid war and potential Russian interference with troop transfers. The proposal for more rotating forces must be formally developed by Pentagon planners and then approved by the Obama administration and funded by Congress. Meanwhile, federal prosecutors in at least four states are mounting investigations into what they describe as widespread fraud by compounding pharmacies in claims to the health-insurance program that covers U.S. military members and their families.
Make the Grade
Colleges and universities have become one of the most effective lobbying forces in Washington, beating back dozens of government proposals to measure their successes and failures, including a federal ratings system. The higher-education industry employed more lobbyists last year than any other industries except drug manufacturing and technology. The political pressure is rooted in a simple but vexing question: Is the government getting a good return on the money it is pouring into the U.S. college system? There are few clear metrics to determine if schools are succeeding or failing, but colleges and their lobbyists say many of the proposed requirements they opposed would have made it more difficult for colleges to serve students of all different abilities and economic means.
Let M Help You
What if you could replace most of your web searches and apps with a single interface that just gets things done? That is the premise of Facebook’s new “M”—a “digital assistant” available through its chat app, Facebook Messenger. Still in beta, M is only available to approximately 10,000 people in the Bay Area. If it works, Facebook will open up a major new front in its battle with Google and gain access to a gigantic pool of direct-response advertising dollars. Even if M doesn’t succeed, writes columnist Christopher Mims, it is in the vanguard of services that will bring about a sea change in how we interact with computers, a massive transition from using our devices as finicky tools to asking our devices to simply take care of things for us.
TODAY'S VIDEO
See Spot’s Owner Run
That Was Painless
More owners and pooches are working out together in organized groups. One company holds exercise classes for dogs and their owners in New York City parks—offering everything from running to yoga.
TOP STORIES
U.S.

Why Opposition to Trade Deals Is So Entrenched

Rubio and Cruz: From Similar Backgrounds, a Study in Contrasts
WORLD

Hopes Ebb for Survivors of Brazil Deluge

Sharm El Sheikh Airport Staff Under Scrutiny in Russian Plane-Crash Investigation
BUSINESS

Pfizer Piles Profits Abroad

Pinterest Sharpens Its Visual-Search Skills
MARKETS

U.S. Stock Outlook Turns Murkier

Apollo’s Deal for Control of Schorsch Real-Estate Empire Falls Apart
NUMBER OF THE DAY
$300 million
The paper losses suffered over the past three months by Tiger Ratan Capital Fund. The fund, down 33% in that time, was founded by Nehal Chopra, who earlier this year became one of the few women to manage more than $1 billion in an industry long dominated by men.
QUOTE OF THE DAY
The story as he presented it is true. A couple of the details are fuzzy.
Ben Carson’s campaign manager, Barry Bennett, responding to reports of inconsistencies in Mr. Carson’s biographical anecdotes.
TODAY'S QUESTION
Going back to our story above, what are your thoughts on colleges and universities lobbying to prevent federal oversight? Send your comments, which we may edit before publication, to 10point@wsj.com. Please include your name and location.
—Compiled by Margaret Rawson
READER RESPONSE
On Friday’s question about the rivalry between former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and Sen. Marco Rubio, James J. Hyland of Wisconsin wrote, “Ronald Reagan would be sad to hear all these GOP candidates, many of whom describe themselves as Reaganites, violate his 11th commandment, ‘Thou shalt not speak ill of any fellow Republican.’ Let’s hope when they are here in Milwaukee, they heed Reagan’s advice and focus on championing their solutions for a country in need of them, rather than engaging in another senseless round of name-calling and reputation badgering.” Ted and Francoise Gianoutsos of Alaska opined, “Jeb Bush and Marco Rubio deserve each other, but we don’t deserve either one of them as president!” But Scott N. Ledbetter of Georgia weighed in, “Both Jeb Bush and Marco Rubio have the credentials to make a fine president. Each should take the high road during the primary process, presenting their ideas to provide better leadership for our country, avoiding personal attacks except legitimate criticism of the likely Democrat challenger.”
This daily briefing is named "The 10-Point" after the nickname conferred by the editors of The Wall Street Journal on the lead column of the legendary "What's News" digest of top stories. Technically, "10-point" referred to the size of the typeface. The type is smaller now but the name lives on.
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