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News@Law, 10/20/2017

News@Law is a selection of the day's news clips regarding Harvard Law School.
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Today's News

WIRED
The case against the T-Mobile/Sprint Merger
An op-ed by Susan Crawford. Like the repeated hook of a pop song that you can’t get out of your head, mergers between the already-powerful wireless giants keep coming. In the previous greatest hits category of wireless consolidation, the Obama administration managed to stop the music for a while: Its DOJ blocked AT&T from buying T-Mobile in 2011, and a 2014 effort by Sprint to merge with T-Mobile was rebuffed by regulators. But the beat goes on, as rumors are swirling this month that Sprint and T-Mobile will soon announce plans to merge. This 2017 merger reprise—an attempt to revive the bad old days when harmful acquisitions were shooed past regulators—should also be soundly rejected.
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Bloomberg
Richard Spencer Has Only Himself to Blame for Hecklers
An op-ed by Noah Feldman. It was Richard Spencer’s party, and he can cry if he wants to. But the hecklers who shouted down the white supremacist Thursday at his University of Florida speech were invited guests, not government crashers. They held tickets distributed by Spencer’s own National Policy Institute. So they didn’t violate Spencer’s free speech rights by drowning him out with chants telling him to go home. Only the government is obligated to respect free speech rights -- and the university and law enforcement did everything by the book, to protect Spencer’s safety and preserve law and order outside the venue.
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The Harvard Crimson
With New Blog, Law Review Makes Case For Online Content
The Harvard Law Review launched a new online blog Tuesday aimed at providing more accessible, timely content alongside their usual long-form fare...“We’ve been publishing long-form, in-depth analysis in our print volume for over a century,” said Kathleen S. Shelton [`18], the Law Review's Blog Chair...Harvard Law professor Jack L. Goldsmith and legal journalist Benjamin Wittes wrote in a Tuesday post that the new medium will “foster better debates.” “Blogs are not, as they are often dismissed to be, shallow,” Goldsmith and Wittes wrote. “Of course they can be, just as an 80-page article can be. But to write well in this format, one must be expert enough to articulate the heart of an argument quickly and persuasively. That is not easy.”
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Green Tech Media
FERC Faces Barrage of Comments on DOE’s Coal, Nuclear Cost-Recovery Rule
With the deadline for public comment on the Department of Energy's controversial proposal to provide cost recovery for coal and nuclear power plants fast approaching, all sides have been weighing in. The DOE’s notice of public rulemaking (NOPR) is currently in the hands of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), which recently agreed to an expedited review period...In a filing this week, Ari Peskoe, a Harvard Law School senior fellow writing for the Harvard Environmental Policy Initiative, laid out a Iegal argument he discussed days after the NOPR first came out during an interview on The Interchange with GTM Research chief Shayle Kann. In simple terms, DOE hasn’t shown, or even proposed, that current wholesale rates in FERC-regulated jurisdictions are “unjust and unreasonable” or “unduly discriminatory” -- and without such a finding, FERC has no justification to act to change what’s already in place.
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Washington Business Journal
Want to disconnect? This tiny house startup once featured on ‘Shark Tank’ has put down roots outside D.C.
Two hours outside of D.C., near the Shenandoah Valley, 20 tiny houses sit on 80 acres of wooded land. Brooklyn-based Getaway brought them here after piloting its concept outside of Boston and New York. The idea? Put small cabins in remote locations near cities as a place to briefly disconnect. The co-founders, now backed with $15 million from Connecticut-based private equity firm L Catterton after a Series A that closed in February, opened reservations for D.C.-area residents earlier this month and, now, are preparing to welcome their first guest in about a week. The college friends and business partners, founder and CEO Jon Staff and co-founder Pete Davis [`18], started the company in 2015, when Staff was at Harvard Business School and Davis was at Harvard Law School.
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The Harvard Crimson
GSAS Students Seek to Publicize Immigration Resources
...The Law School’s Immigration and Refugee Clinic has been Harvard’s first line of defense against Trump’s anti-immigration policies, offering legal assistance to Harvard affiliates with immigration concerns and filing high-profile amicus briefs in cases challenging Trump's travel bans. Still, according to Patricia N. Manos, a graduate student and supporter of the unionization effort, some Harvard affiliates are unaware of the University’s legal resources for TPS recipients...Manos added that the University’s legal clinics are also open to Harvard employees and students’ families: “It's worth noting, and a lot of employees don't know this, that the legal clinic is interpreting the Harvard community pretty broadly,” she said.
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