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Equity Office Daily Brief: April 27, 2016

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Daily Brief

April 27, 2016

  EquilityOffice

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Oak Park Plaza Sells for $12 Million

San Fernando Valley Business Journal

 

Oak Park Plaza, a 29,950-square-foot shopping center at 702-706 Lindero Canyon Road in Oak Park, has sold for nearly $12 million, according to Lee & Associates-LA North/Ventura. Oak Park Properties bought the property from Oak Park Assets in an off-market transaction. Tenants at...

 



BLOG & ONLINE NEWS

 

Who Is Moving to Koreatown?

GlobeSt.com

 

It seems to have happened all of the sudden: Koreatown is flourishing, and it is attracting new demographics to the historically Korean—as the eponymous name indicates—market. Ken Kahan, president of California Landmark Group, which recently invested in the market, says that...

 


Hudson Joins CBC SC as Executive Managing Director

CoStar.com

 

Don Hudson has joined Coldwell Banker Commercial Sudweeks Commercial, Inc. (CBC SC) as executive managing director with the company's Ontario, CA office. Hudson brings more than 30 years of commercial real estate experience, most recently serving in a similar role for Coldwell...

 


Global Agri-Trade Corporation Buys 62k sf Industrial Building in LA County

RENTV.com

 

Global Agri-Trade Corporation purchased a recently completed, 62.5k sf industrial building in unincorporated Los Angeles County. The new building provides approximately 57k sf of warehouse and 5k sf of office space. Located on 2.8 acres at 15500 S. Avalon Blvd, the property...

 


This Week's LA Deal Sheet

Bisnow

 

Stevenson Ranch Plaza in Santa Clarita, a 187,035 SF shopping center anchored by Ralph's, just sold for $72.5M. Bisnow caught up with Hanley Investment Group president Ed Hanley and InvenTrust Properties Corp SVP of transactions Chris Covey to get the scoop on...

 


Behind The Deal: How One Co-Working Company Expanded To The West Coast

Bisnow

 

Co-working company Industrious recently signed its first LA lease at 600 Wilshire Blvd, making the first foray on the West Coast for the New York-based company. Bisnow caught up with those close to the deal to find out more about it.Industrious...

 


4 Reasons Why Companies Are Moving Back To The City

Bisnow

 

Mature businesses and startups alike are moving back to the cities, reversing a pattern that began way back in the 1960s. But why are cities favored by businesses again? From the Wall Street Journal, here are four explanations: 1. Workspace Configurations Private offices...

 


Do We Need To Put Drones On A Tighter Leash?

Alley Watch

 

Drones are showing up at airports, on federal land and on the Internet, and they are starting to make some lawmakers, and some members of the public very nervous. Between showing up in places they are not supposed to be, interfering with...

 

FULL TEXT


Oak Park Plaza Sells for $12 Million

San Fernando Valley Business Journal

 

Oak Park Plaza, a 29,950-square-foot shopping center at 702-706 Lindero Canyon Road in Oak Park, has sold for nearly $12 million, according to Lee & Associates-LA North/Ventura.

Oak Park Properties bought the property from Oak Park Assets in an off-market transaction.

Tenants at the retail center include Subway, On The Thirty, Stevenson Fitness and Margarita’s Mexican Grill.

Jeff McGuire, a principal with Lee & Associates, and Slavic Zlatkin, also of Lee & Associates, represented Oak Park Assets in the deal. Zlatkin also represented the buyer.

“Oak Park Plaza is a very busy center in an affluent community,” McGuire said, “and it offered the buyer a great location with quality tenants.”

-Carol Lawrence

Who Is Moving to Koreatown?

GlobeSt.com

 

It seems to have happened all of the sudden: Koreatown is flourishing, and it is attracting new demographics to the historically Korean—as the eponymous name indicates—market. Ken Kahan, president of California Landmark Group, which recently invested in the market, says that there is an interesting demographic shift of young people moving to the market for its culture and texture.

“Koreatown has historically been a Korean community, but now we are seeing two demographic shifts,” Kahan tells GlobeSt.com. “We are seeing a younger and hip Korean clientele, and we are seeing a younger and hip white clientele, and I think that is because Koreatown is becoming more hip. The areas around the Line Hotel are really different and neat. It isn’t Hollywood, but it also isn’t Downtown. Tenants are looking at it as another alternative, and we are looking at it for that reason.”

The Line Hotel, from visionary Roy Choi and Sydell Group, opened in January 2014, and has been somewhat of a catalyst for the market, which was previously a fractured series of shops and restaurants with no epicenter. “The Line Hotel has been a catalyst for the demographic shift,” explains Kahan. “The people were there, but there wasn’t a congregating area, and so prior to the Line Hotel opening, there were spotty places where you could go, but it wasn’t a large part of the overall community. Now, you are seeing this whole new market that is being created, and as a result, more and more people are coming. That is a big deal.” He says that millennials are moving to the market from all over Los Angeles: the Westside, Hollywood and Downtown.

California Landmark Group is focused on following these demographic shifts and investing in burgeoning markets with plenty of upside and longevity, but the company is especially fond of the Koreatown market. “L.A. is becoming or is a world-class city, and people move around,” adds Kahan. “I actually think of L.A. as a series of neighborhoods. Koreatown is a true neighborhood, and it has really interesting character. The only way to experience it is to walk it and to eat in the cafes and go in the shops.”

-Kelsi Maree Borland

Hudson Joins CBC SC as Executive Managing Director

CoStar.com

 

Don Hudson has joined Coldwell Banker Commercial Sudweeks Commercial, Inc. (CBC SC) as executive managing director with the company's Ontario, CA office.

Hudson brings more than 30 years of commercial real estate experience, most recently serving in a similar role for Coldwell Banker Commercial Alliance in Los Angeles. Before that he was an executive vice president and managing director at Newmark Grubb Knight Frank and the former Grubb & Ellis. Before starting his commercial real estate career with CBRE, he held sales and management positions with IBM Corporation and Wells Fargo Bank.

"The growth of our business has created both a need and an opportunity to bring a dynamic leader like Don into our organization," said Brandon Sudweeks, chief executive officer of CBC SC. "Don and I have spent a lot of time together at CBC conferences and we have worked closely on the CBC leadership committee for the past few years. Don is an amazing leader who always works with honesty, integrity and reliability. He will fit in perfect to our company culture and will be a great asset for all of us."

Hudson attended St. Lawrence University, earning his bachelor's of business degree in business and international trade at the University of Southern California.

-Justin Sumner

Global Agri-Trade Corporation Buys 62k sf Industrial Building in LA County

RENTV.com

 

Global Agri-Trade Corporation purchased a recently completed, 62.5k sf industrial building in unincorporated Los Angeles County. The new building provides approximately 57k sf of warehouse and 5k sf of office space.

Located on 2.8 acres at 15500 S. Avalon Blvd, the property was developed by Panattoni Development Company Inc. Global Agri-Trade Corporation will relocate its warehouse and office space, now located in La Mirada and Long Beach, to this single location, which will provide greater overall efficiencies for the international firm by consolidating its operations and corporate uses.

Global Agri-Trade Corporation was represented in the purchase by NGKF Managing Director Christopher Beck and Senior Managing Director Ryan Harding. The seller, Panattoni Development Company Inc., represented itself. The price was not disclosed.

Global Agri-Trade Corporation, a joint venture of Bhatt Holdings and Nagel family, with offices in Canada, Singapore, Malaysia, India, and Germany, is the leading importer and distributor of certified sustainable, packaged, non-GMO oils for food manufacturing, palm oil products for animal nutrition, and coconut oils.

“The tenant was interested in this building even before it was built. The unique building footprint, strategic location and ability to separate Global Agri-Trade’s two businesses in one warehouse were all significant attractions to the project. The overall efficiency they will achieve in the new building will improve their business operations and help them to service customers better for many years to come,” Beck said.

-Staff

This Week's LA Deal Sheet

Bisnow

 

Stevenson Ranch Plaza in Santa Clarita, a 187,035 SF shopping center anchored by Ralph's, just sold for $72.5M.

Bisnow caught up with Hanley Investment Group president Ed Hanley and InvenTrust Properties Corp SVP of transactions Chris Covey to get the scoop on the deal. InvenTrust, a self-managed REIT, purchased the property from a local private investor. Ed (pictured with his son, Brendan, in Cabo San Lucas) says the seller recognized this property was an "excellent fit for an institutional buyer" interested in acquiring a "top-notch retail center in a market with superior demographics." The seller wanted to capitalize on the current market conditions, according to Ed.

Chris says Stevenson Ranch Plaza "met the parameters for InvenTrust Properties’ acquisition strategy," which include it being in a market with "projected income and population growth." It helped that the property is close to three other InvenTrust centers in LA. As a result, InvenTrust Properties will be able to apply "our strategic knowledge of the market to property leasing and operations," Chris says.

SALES California Landmark Group bought the Lafayette Park Apartments in Koreatown (349 S Lafayette Park Place) for $23.75M from a private investor in an off-market deal. The 120-unit apartment community was built in 1971 and has a mix of one-bedroom floor plans. California Landmark Group plans to embark on a $4M capital improvement program over the next several years, including renovating the building’s exterior, pool area and clubhouse. There will be new stone countertops, cabinetry, flooring, lighting and other interior improvements. The deal was financed with a $17.5M first mortgage loan from Mesa West Capital. Mesa West VP Brandon Bachner originated the financing. Marcus & Millichap SVP of investments Stewart Weston repped California Landmark Group.

LEASING Legacy Partners, in a partnership with Griffin Capital and Silverpeak Real Estate Partners, just closed the ground lease on a 2.81-acre parcel in Monrovia, adjacent to the new Monrovia Station. MODA at Monrovia Station will have 261 apartments. MODA at Monrovia Station will feature state-of-the-art appliances, a clubhouse, a fitness center and a game room. There will be outdoor living spaces, two landscaped courtyards, kitchens, barbecue areas, fire pits and a 4k SF rooftop terrace. It is expected to be completed in early 2018.

Global Agri-Trade Corp just bought a new 62,482 SF industrial building in unincorporated LA County (15500 S Avalon Blvd). Panattoni Development Co developed the property. Global Agri-Trade Corp will move its warehouse and office space, now in La Mirada and Long Beach, to the new location. Newmark Grubb Knight Frank managing director Christopher Beck and senior managing director Ryan Harding repped Global Agri-Trade, a JV between Bhatt Holdings and the Nagel family. Panattoni Development repped itself. The purchase price was not disclosed. *** Ocean West Capital Partners, with advisory oversight by Cushman & Wakefield’s Jason Palda, just bought Commercenter Newport in Newport Beach. Commercenter Newport is a 47,460 SF building, multi-tenant office campus in the Airport Area of Newport Beach. The floor to ceiling window line, expansive ceiling heights and opportunities for private and community collaboration areas were a major attraction.

Global Agri-Trade Corp just bought a new 62,482 SF industrial building in unincorporated LA County (15500 S Avalon Blvd). Panattoni Development Co developed the property. Global Agri-Trade Corp will move its warehouse and office space, now in La Mirada and Long Beach, to the new location. Newmark Grubb Knight Frank managing director Christopher Beck and senior managing director Ryan Harding repped Global Agri-Trade, a JV between Bhatt Holdings and the Nagel family. Panattoni Development repped itself. The purchase price was not disclosed. *** Ocean West Capital Partners, with advisory oversight by Cushman & Wakefield’s Jason Palda, just bought Commercenter Newport in Newport Beach. Commercenter Newport is a 47,460 SF building, multi-tenant office campus in the Airport Area of Newport Beach. The floor to ceiling window line, expansive ceiling heights and opportunities for private and community collaboration areas were a major attraction.

KTGY Architecture + Planning announced Timber in Newark, CA, built by homebuilder Trumark Homes and designed by KTGY, received top honors at the 2016 Building Industry Association Bay Area Excellence in Home Building Awards earlier this month. Timber received the “Multi-Product Community of the Year” and “Best Architectural Design – Multi-Family” Awards. The community also received an award for “Best Signage.” The new community consists of 80 for-sale townhomes at Canopy at Timber (pictured above). Canopy’s 1,540 SF townhomes include three bedrooms with a bathroom off each bedroom. The largest townhouse option, at 2,026 SF, has four bedrooms and three and a half bathrooms.

KTGY Architecture + Planning announced Timber in Newark, CA, built by homebuilder Trumark Homes and designed by KTGY, received top honors at the 2016 Building Industry Association Bay Area Excellence in Home Building Awards earlier this month. Timber received the “Multi-Product Community of the Year” and “Best Architectural Design – Multi-Family” Awards. The community also received an award for “Best Signage.” The new community consists of 80 for-sale townhomes at Canopy at Timber (pictured above). Canopy’s 1,540 SF townhomes include three bedrooms with a bathroom off each bedroom. The largest townhouse option, at 2,026 SF, has four bedrooms and three and a half bathrooms.

-Karen Jordan

Behind The Deal: How One Co-Working Company Expanded To The West Coast

Bisnow

 

Co-working company Industrious recently signed its first LA lease at 600 Wilshire Blvd, making the first foray on the West Coast for the New York-based company. Bisnow caught up with those close to the deal to find out more about it.Industrious CEO Jamie Hodari (pictured above with co-founder and co-CEO Justin Stuart) says they chose LA because they believe “in a lot of ways, it’s probably the strongest market in the country in terms of where we see demand growing for co-working.”

Jamie says they are “very bullish” on downtown LA in particular. Industrious prides itself on offering “the premium end of the co-working market,” he says. Onni Group owns the building, which it purchased in late 2004, according to CBRE Global Real Estate Services associate Michael Nieman. He, along with CBRE associate Jerome Fried, repped Industrious. CBRE VP Andrew Tashjian repped the landlord, Onni Group. Michael tells Bisnow Industrious' decision to establish its first West Coast location at 600 Wilshire had a lot to do with the amenities in the area, including Karl Strauss Brewery downstairs, Bottega Louie next door, a new Whole Foods a block away, and LA Live and Staples Center within walking distance.

The building also is not far from The Bloc and Fig at 7th mall. Michael says Onni understands how spaces are "evolving to foster more creative, collaborative workplaces.” Industrious is a tenant that will create buzz and help attract more creative companies as well as incubate future tenants, according to Michael. Industrious signed a 10-year lease for $8M and will take up 18,853 SF, the entire fifth floor, according to Michael. Industrious plans to launch at least three other locations in LA over the next 18 months, including Santa Monica, Hollywood, Century City and potentially Culver City, Jamie says.

The goal is to have a “network of spaces” around LA where companies can, for example, have an office in Santa Monica but have a space to take meetings downtown and vice versa, Jamie says. The 600 Wilshire Blvd offices will mark the company's 12th location. Jamie says Industrious was attracted to the building because of its beautiful lobby, great gym and showers. He says these are “things our users tend to really appreciate.” Industrious plans to expand to other cities over the next year, including Nashville, Austin, Boston, Manhattan, Washington, DC, Seattle and Denver. Jamie says the LA location will open this summer.-Karen Jordan

4 Reasons Why Companies Are Moving Back To The City

Bisnow

 

Mature businesses and startups alike are moving back to the cities, reversing a pattern that began way back in the 1960s. But why are cities favored by businesses again? From the Wall Street Journal, here are four explanations:

1. Workspace Configurations

Private offices and cubicles are quickly becoming a thing of the past as employers realize open, modern offices (usually in cities) better stimulate innovation and facilitate communication. These offices also take up less space and therefore cost less per person.

2. Large, Diverse Talent Pools

Companies are realizing that not only is talent critical to long-term success, but so is diversity. And, as the workforce migrates towards urban life, cities are the best place to find both.

3. Plethora Of Advisers & Services

Cities offer the armies of consultants, lawyers, bankers, accountants and every other professional imaginable businesses need so they can focus 100% of their attention on their core competencies.

4. Staying Competitive

And above all, being in the city allows businesses to stay abreast of customer needs and respond most effectively to competition. There's certainly a benefit to being "in the center" of it all.

-Staff

Do We Need To Put Drones On A Tighter Leash?

Alley Watch

 

Drones are showing up at airports, on federal land and on the Internet, and they are starting to make some lawmakers, and some members of the public very nervous.

Between showing up in places they are not supposed to be, interfering with activities such as firefighting and being turned into casual weapons, the concerns have caused regulators at the Federal Aviation Administration to launch investigations, and led some lawmakers to call for tougher rules.

However, observers inside and outside the industry are divided as to which rules can be practically implemented and whether they will prove to be needlessly onerous to legitimate users of the growing technology. Some also say that there is too little clarity over what is permitted now, and what may be allowed in the near future, which is deterring some would-be drone users from adopting the technology.

The market for both recreational and commercial use is growing fast and shows no sign of letting up. The Consumer Electronics Association recently reported that drone sales in the United States are expected to total $105 million in 2015, up more than 50 percent from last year. The group expects 700,000 drones to be sold by the end of 2015.

“I think that what is interesting about this technology is that its accessibility is evolving faster than regulation,” said Margot Kaminski, an assistant professor of law at Ohio State University. The issue is that they are being widely adopted by unlicensed, untrained people, and regulators in this field, particularly the FAA, are not used to managing that kind of user, she said.

Reports of various dubious drone activities keep trickling in. In the last week, four different commercial airline crews reported spotting drones near New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport.

Worries are not just limited to airlines.

Last January, a hobby drone crash-landed on the White House lawn, after a man who lived in the area lost contact with it. Flying drones outdoors is illegal in Washington, D.C., but the man was not charged. Early in July, an 18-year-old from Connecticut posted a video on YouTube showing a tricked-out drone mounted with a pistol—that successfully fired.

Drone activity has also hampered firefighting activities in the West, forcing agencies to ground firefighting planes. The machines are potentially a threat to low-flying airplanes, including the planes that drop fire retardant on wildfires, or helicopters that transport medical patients.

After drone sightings forced wild land firefighters to ground planes in California’s San Bernardino Mountains, U.S. Rep. Paul Cook, R-Calif., introduced a bill into Congress called the Wildfire Airspace Protection Act of 2015. If implemented, the bill would impose a fine and up to five years in prison for anyone convicted of flying a drone that interferes with firefighting planes on federal land.

U.S. Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., who represents communities near Los Angeles, has also asked the FAA to consider mandating “geofencing” technology in civilian drones—essentially a technology that prevents drones from flying into specific areas

“We are urging the FAA to consider the options available to stop commercial drones from interfering with first responders, including technological measures like geofencing which prevent drones from flying in a restricted airspace. … We are not prescribing any particular technological solution, but given the clear danger posed by the reckless use of civilian drones near wildfires as well as airports, it’s appropriate for the FAA to consider all measures within their authority,” said a statement sent to CNBC by Schiff’s office.

Could new rules be enforced?

Controlling drones through regulation or legislation may be easier said than done.

For one thing, the legal structure surrounding the use of drones is a bit of a patchwork. The FAA has issued guidelines and a few hard rules for operators, and is considering implementing stricter rules. The agency says it intends to finalize rules by the end of 2015.

The FAA currently considers any drone less than 55 pounds and used for noncommercial purposes to be akin to a model airplane. There are still rules for those craft, including staying away from manned aircraft such as passenger planes, flying below 400 feet to avoid other aircraft and keeping the drone within the operator’s line of sight.

Anything larger needs to be certified with an “aero modeling community-based organization” that is presumably training its members to pilot larger craft.

If users are going to pilot drones for any kind of commercial purpose—including things such as professional journalism—they require special permission from the FAA. The agency recently announced that it has handed out 1,000 such certificates so far, for industries as far ranging as film production, real estate and agriculture.

In addition, local governments have instituted drone-specific laws, and some law enforcement authorities have suggested that drone users could be charged with reckless endangerment if local cops consider their drones unsafe.

Most recently, Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., called for the implementation of geofencing technology. Installing it, “seems to be the simplest and most effective way to ensure safety,” according to a statement issued by Schumer’s office in February. “This technology also takes human error out of the equation.”

Staff members at Schumer’s offices in New York City and Washington, D.C., did not return requests for comment.

Even if some of these measures are put in place, it may be too late for them to be effective.

Given the number of drones that are already in the hands of users, it’s hard to see how geofencing could be implemented in any useful way, said John Hansman, a professor of aeronautics and astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

“I just don’t see how geofencing would work,” Hansman told CNBC. “There are already so many of these drones out there and more are already being sold every day.”

You can read more at: Facebook: Drone ready for testing later this year

Many of the proposed rules cover what is considered common sense, even in the industry. “Unmanned aircraft shouldn’t be flying close to airports, close to manned aircraft or above 400 feet,” said Tom McMahon, a spokesman for the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AVUSI) in a statement sent to CNBC. “These are common-sense guidelines, but many new UAS enthusiasts aren’t taking the time to understand where they should and should not fly.”

McMahon added that the AVUSI, along with the FAA and the “recreational community” are working to place materials in product packaging that inform customers about safety and laws.

“It is generally not good to have a piece of technology that crudely restricts how you use something.” -Ryan Calo, Professor of law at the University of Washington

Moreover, the “drone” category is incredibly broad, and can include large sophisticated unmanned vehicles weighing hundreds or even thousands of pounds as well as tiny and inexpensive “micro drones” sold as toys or hobby items. Enforcing the placement of geofencing technology on all of these might be prohibitively difficult, Hansman said.

A more practical approach would be to find better ways of catching the people who misuse them, Hansman said. “A lot of these, especially the smaller hobby drones are run by radio control, like a model airplane. Therefore, you can track the location of the signals being sent to the device. That technology has already been around for a long time,” he said.

Ryan Calo, a professor of law at the University of Washington, does not care for restrictive technological measures such as geofencing, saying they might not work as planned and could prevent owners from using drones in ways that are perfectly legal and potentially beneficial.

“It is generally not good to have a piece of technology that crudely restricts how you use something,” Calo said.

For example, some companies have already tried to place geofencing technology in their drones, resulting in glitches or unexpected consequences that have prevented drones from doing things that would otherwise be safe, he said.

In addition, Calo said, many laws already in place could apply to drone users. The FAA has already banned all drones from flying within a certain distance of airports, and there are already laws against interfering with emergency workers, such as firefighters.

“I would say that we don’t need additional laws around use of drones, but rather we need people to comply with laws we already have,” Calo told CNBC. “There are all kinds of ways you can behave irresponsibly … this is not the first time we have had to integrate new technology.”

The lack of regulatory clarity—plus the fact that some local governments have stricter laws than others—may contribute to consumer confusion on proper use. There is also no training or education for drone buyers.

“There is an incredibly loud and justified group that is pointing out that the government is taking too long to put clear rules in place,” said Ohio State’s Kaminski “There are real lost jobs due to the amount of time that the FAA is taking to regulate drones.”

“That said, you don’t want to regulate too quickly, because you might either pass too many regulations, or you won’t pass enough and you will get these high-profile incidents like we are seeing now. It is a balance between regulating too quickly and banning things that you want or regulating too slowly and unintentionally allowing things that could be harmful,” Kaminski said.

“But, comparatively, the U.S. is moving very slowly,” she said.

That said it might not be fair to saddle the FAA with the task of regulating every aspect of drone use.

“The FAA is not used to regulating things that are cheap and widely used. That makes ill-suited for FAA-based regulation,” Kaminski said. “The FAA is only part of the answer.”

-Robert Ferris

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