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Equity Office Daily Brief: May 23, 2016

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Daily Brief

May 23, 2016

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How The Sharing Economy Is Changing Office Space As We Know It

Forbes

 

Families, friends and neighbors have been sharing items like cars, clothing and equipment for centuries, but thanks to technology and society’s growing interest in saving money and on-demand services, sharing has turned into a profitable economic model. A number of sharing services...

 


L.A.'s Costly Bet on Curbing Car Culture

Wall Street Journal

 

LOS ANGELES—When Tim Douglas and his partner moved to Los Angeles last summer, the deciding factor in choosing a home wasn’t proximity to a beach or freeway. They wanted to be close to a train. Mr. Douglas, who is 26 and doesn’t...

 


SSV, Invesco Pocket a Bundle on South Bay Office Sale

Commercial Property Executive

 

Veni, vidi, vici. SSV Properties and Invesco Real Estate came to metropolitan Los Angeles’ South Bay area, saw an opportunity, and conquered the local creative office market. Three years after acquiring Apollo at Rosecrans in El Segundo, the joint venture partners...

 


Farmers Sells Westlake Village Building

San Fernando Valley Business Journal

 

As evidence of Conejo Valley’s hot market for investors, L.A.-based insurer Farmers Group Inc. has sold its building in Westlake Village for $18.6 million, according to real estate activity tracking database CoStar Realty Information Inc. One person close to the transaction said...

 


CBRE Sells Site For $330M

Los Angeles Business Journal

 

CBRE Global Investors has sold its parent company CBRE’s headquarters in downtown for $330 million after bringing it to nearly full occupancy and making numerous renovations. “It’s been a very, very positive outcome for CBRE Global Investors and the clients they represent,”...

 



BLOG & ONLINE NEWS

 

Argent Retail Advisors Awarded Leasing Assignment for 374k sf South Bay Center

RENTV.com

 

Stoltz Real Estate Partners has awarded Argent Retail Advisors, led by Terry Bortnick, the leasing assignment for Promenade on the Peninsula (POP), a 374.2k sf retail center in Rolling Hills Estates. Stoltz acquired the three-story, mixed-use center in 2006. Promendade on...

 


Is Inclusive Internet the Future of Office?

GlobeSt.com

 

With the ubiquity of the internet, it seems that inclusive internet—an internet service included in an office or multifamily lease—is just around the corner. However, Marc Gittleman, the CEO of 5×5 Telecom, a fiber optic internet and VoIP phone company, says...

 

FULL TEXT


How The Sharing Economy Is Changing Office Space As We Know It

Forbes

 

Families, friends and neighbors have been sharing items like cars, clothing and equipment for centuries, but thanks to technology and society’s growing interest in saving money and on-demand services, sharing has turned into a profitable economic model.

A number of sharing services have popped up in recent years, from ride-sharing service Uber, which is disrupting the taxi industry, to home-sharing service Airbnb, which is changing how people book travel accommodations.

The sharing trend has also influenced the commercial real estate industry, including how owners and managers market and lease their properties. One recent CIT survey found four out of 10 executives believe the sharing economy is having a “significant impact” on their commercial real estate investments.

Here’s how the trend is shaping commercial real estate today.

Re-imagining Ownership And Shared Space

The Vancouver Tool Library is a concept built on the idea that thousands of tools are owned but most are used only sparingly over the course of years — so why not borrow them instead of buying them?

It’s a sharing model that John Madden, director of Sustainability and Engineering at the University of British Columbia, analyzed in his NAIOP report published last year titled “Exploring the New Sharing Economy.”

Madden said the sharing economy’s take on tool lending can also apply to common areas of office buildings. Some office buildings, he said, can include common area space to house items that all tenants can share.

“This platform works at the community scale, but it could also work on the building scale,” Madden said.

While the academic’s perspective may not be shared by some in-the-trenches real estate pros, industry executives say the sharing economy has nevertheless influenced the design of common areas as a whole.

Josh Kuriloff, executive vice chairman with Cushman & Wakefield in New York, says the sharing economy has created a need for common areas to be rich in amenities that encourage collaboration. Today, you’re more likely to see Wi-Fi-enabled cafes, couches and whiteboards in these areas.

“A decade ago, you would have never had someone asking for these things,” Kuriloff said. “But today, if a landlord is not in touch with and not responding or disrupting assets or simply upgrading them, then potentially, they don’t have a value proposition to offer.”

Idling Capacity

The sharing economy takes advantage of what Madden calls the “idling capacity” of assets — regardless of whether they’re products or real estate holdings. As a result, owners of these assets are now less conventional in how they lease.

In retail environments, for example, instead of a landlord leaving space vacant for a long period of time in hopes of getting a long-term lease at fair market value, he or she may be more inclined to lease to a short-term tenant, such as a pop-up artist’s gallery.

Madden also points to Marriott Hotels’ partnership with LiquidSpace, a marketplace for short-term work spaces. With LiquidSpace, traveling executives or entrepreneurs can book office space for meetings, retreats or quick impromptu brainstorm sessions at a moment’s notice.

The partnership lets Marriott rent out its existing conference spaces for short-term needs — even hourly or daily – to fill time slots when the spaces might otherwise sit unused.

Open Environments

Leasing commercial space today may involve pulling a page from the WeWorks of the world, according to Michael Shohet, vice president of project and development services for Jones Lang LaSalle’s Las Vegas office.

With nearly 100 locations around the globe, WeWork leases big blocks of office space, then divides them into tiny sections to sublease to startups, entrepreneurs and freelancers. The spaces offer amenities such as beer on tap, spacious common areas, private booths for phone calls and other perks.

These open, collaborative environments are models for companies that are building out work spaces today, said Shohet.

Companies are dumping cubicles in favor of undedicated spaces that can be used by anyone. ”Our corporate clients are telling us, ‘I only want fixed workstations for 70 percent of the worker headcount,’“ said Shohet. “They still want larger spaces, but they’re really thinking differently about how to use that space.”

Restrictions On Sharing

Airbnb, WeWork and LiquidSpace enable the modern version of the classic sublet. These enterprises have inspired businesses, large and small, to be nimble and maximize return on idle space.

Subleasing restrictions, however, have been a commercial office lease mainstay for decades, said Beth Pace Tiggelaar, a partner in the Dallas office of Strasburger Attorneys at Law. Taking advantage of “idling capacity” may not always sit well with landlords.

“Tenants are cautioned against attempting to sneak paying guests into their space. Given the uptick in the sharing economy, landlords would be wise to bring up the issue at the beginning of lease negotiations, so either the tenant understands a strict prohibition, or the parties include very specific rules for paying guests,” Tiggelaar wrote in an article titled “Is Your Lease Ready for the Sharing Economy?”

Both Shohet and Kuriloff say they do not see negative effects from the sharing economy on building financing or leasing. But time will tell whether this new take on resource sharing and the old guard of commercial real estate can continue to find common ground and prosper together.

-Brian Sodoma is a Southern Nevada–based freelance writer with a focus on health, business and real estate.

L.A.'s Costly Bet on Curbing Car Culture

Wall Street Journal

 

LOS ANGELES—When Tim Douglas and his partner moved to Los Angeles last summer, the deciding factor in choosing a home wasn’t proximity to a beach or freeway. They wanted to be close to a train.

Mr. Douglas, who is 26 and doesn’t have a car, lives about a 10-minute walk from a newly extended  $1.5 billion light-rail line. He has a 45-minute commute from his apartment on the city’s west side to his internship downtown. “There’s a much more significant presence of transit than the stereotypes of Los Angeles will have you believe,” he said.

On Friday, for the first time in over half a century, Angelenos could ride a train from downtown to the Pacific Ocean as the city extended Mr. Douglas’s rail line to Santa Monica.

This line, which switches back and forth from elevated tracks to the street level, is a 15-mile jaunt that takes about 45 to 50 minutes end to end. By car, the same trip can take up to an hour at peak times, and is a frustrating journey of stop-and-go lurching in a sea of brake lights. The inaugural runs over the weekend lured families, tourists and public-transit boosters.

Auto-centric Sunbelt cities such as Los Angeles, Phoenix, Denver and Charlotte, N.C., are building out rail systems costing billions of dollars combined, funded in part by sales tax increases approved by traffic-weary voters and aided by federal dollars.

To accompany the expanded systems, urban planners and city leaders have pushed for dense development along the transit lines to encourage ridership by clustering people and businesses near stations. That is changing the character of cities that for decades have been organized around cars.

Los Angeles can’t be “nostalgic about a short 30-to-40-year period that has come and gone,” said Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, speaking of the city’s car culture. “We should have growth occur in the right places, rather than have it spread inefficiently.”

Legendary for its freeway-enabled sprawl, Los Angeles County is embarking on the most ambitious subway and light-rail expansion in the nation. By 2026 the transit system will complete nearly $9 billion worth of rail projects to better connect its 4,000 square miles.

Critics say transit that encourages dense development mires neighborhoods in congestion, and question such levels of spending. While proponents tout the ability of transit systems to boost nearby real-estate values and development—and say such development in turn boosts ridership—the evidence is mixed.

A 2014 study of the Phoenix area’s light-rail system co-written by Arizona State University professor Michael Kuby showed an increase in residential and commercial property values after the system was introduced, extending more than a mile from stations.

But a 2012 study of property values near the light-rail system in Charlotte yielded “a mixed bag” of results, said Michael Duncan, an urban and regional planning professor at Florida State University who co-wrote the study. High-end developers started building near stations in the city’s central business district, for example, but it wasn’t clear if the neighborhood would have blossomed independently of the transit system, he said.

Randal O’Toole, a transportation and land use expert for the conservative Cato Institute, said he believes local governments are investing in light rail only “because the federal government is offering money for it.” If proximity to transit lines does boost property values, “it does so at the expense of values somewhere else in the same city or urban area,” he said.

Transportation researchers argue the primary goal of rail projects isn’t to boost property values but to increase the options for how people get from one place to another.

Rail systems that have the most success in boosting ridership are ones where jobs and population are concentrated near stations, according to a team of UC Berkeley researchers.

Many urban planners believe demographics favor rail: Though population growth is slowing in some cities, college-educated 25-to-49-year-olds were 17% more likely to live in dense urban neighborhoods in 2014 than in 2000, according to Census Bureau data analyzed by economist Jed Kolko, a senior fellow at the Terner Center for Housing Innovation at the University of California, Berkeley.

People aged 18 to 34 also have a stronger preference for expanding public transportation and driving alternatives than other generations, a survey from the National Association of Realtors and Portland State University found.

In Phoenix, the light-rail system opened in 2008 at a cost of $1.4 billion, and runs throughout much of the area, including the airport, the Arizona State University campus in Tempe and “Roosevelt Row,” a Phoenix arts district.

Chris F. Campbell, a longtime Roosevelt Row resident and owner of real-estate firm RooPho Realty LLC, said the neighborhood was growing before light-rail opened, and the rail line tends to be much slower than driving.

But it has drawn young professionals and empty nesters who want public transit as an option, he said. “I get a lot of people who say they want to live close to the light rail,” he said.

Lack of parking also is a major factor in boosting ridership—but in Los Angeles, America’s quintessential car metropolis, available, relatively cheap parking has been considered a civic right for generations.

Approximately 14% of Los Angeles County’s incorporated land—200 square miles—is devoted to parking (significantly larger than the 140 square miles dedicated to roads and freeways), according a study last year from the Journal of the American Planning Association. The city’s zoning code is filled with parking requirements that developers say often run counter to policy makers’ stated goals of increasing density and encouraging alternative forms of transit.

“The reason why developers haven’t built more walkable projects is because the city makes us build all kinds of parking on site whenever you do anything,” said Mott Smith, co-founder of Civic Enterprise, a Los Angeles planning and development firm. “The city has regulated walkability out of development.”

Los Angeles has worked to relax parking requirements and height restrictions in popular areas like Hollywood and Koreatown, but that has prompted backlash. A coalition of Hollywood residents in recent years has mounted legal challenges to several high-rise developments in the area, arguing such projects would leave nearby single-family neighborhoods mired in traffic.

One Hollywood group is planning to gather signatures for a ballot initiative next year that would put a two-year moratorium on higher-density projects in the city. In Santa Monica, near the end of the newly extended light rail line, a group of residents two years ago pressured the City Council to vote down a mixed-use project near one of the stops that would have brought more than 400 housing units to the area. Protestors had gathered enough signatures for a referendum on the project.

Along some transit lines there are signs of change. In LA’s  Koreatown, Jimmy Han, owner of a craft beer bar and restaurant, examines his half-empty parking lot on a busy Friday evening. A few years ago it was jammed with cars on popular nights, but more patrons now walk from the train station about a block away.

“It used to be that no one walked anywhere in Los Angeles, even if you were going to the corner store five blocks away,” Mr. Han said. “But slowly that mentality has been changing, and it’s giving people more options.”

-Write to Chris Kirkham at chris.kirkham@wsj.com and Cameron McWhirter at cameron.mcwhirter@wsj.com

SSV, Invesco Pocket a Bundle on South Bay Office Sale

Commercial Property Executive

 

Veni, vidi, vici. SSV Properties and Invesco Real Estate came to metropolitan Los Angeles’ South Bay area, saw an opportunity, and conquered the local creative office market. Three years after acquiring Apollo at Rosecrans in El Segundo, the joint venture partners have sold the 545,000-square-foot, Class A property to Intercontinental Real Estate Corp. for more than $300 million. The deal is being called one of the highest per square-foot office trades ever in the South Bay area.

It was in 2013 when SSV and Invesco acquired Apollo at Rosecrans, then mostly vacant and known as Park Place, for just $57.4 million. Three years and one major repositioning later, the partners determined it was time to let go. “There was no reason not to sell,” David Jordon, president, SSV, told Commercial Property Executive. “The project reached lease stabilization and finished construction, and our objective was always to exit the asset. It was never a long-term hold. This was a very good time to sell—it’s a very strong capital market.” Commercial real estate services firms CBRE Group and Newmark Grubb Knight Frank represented the partners in the disposition.

After snapping up the asset from developer Continental Development Corp., SSV and Invesco wasted precious little time transforming the property into a creative office campus, shelling out more than $75 million on renovations. Today, the four-building Apollo at Rosecrans, which carries the addresses of 2150, 2120, 2121 and 2175 Park Place, is 98 percent leased and boasts the likes of DaVita HealthCare Partners Inc.’s as a lead tenant. The healthcare company inked a 10-year lease for 185,000 square feet in 2015 in a deal valued at $115 million.

It has the tenancy, and it has quite the reputation. “Apollo at Rosecrans has become the premier creative office campus in the South Bay market,” Jordon said. “It’s established and recognized, and the sale price reflects that. So we were successful in creating what we intended to create.”

The word “creative” is not used loosely in describing Apollo at Rosecrans. The office complex features a host of amenities that tech and creative companies covet, including bike rentals; a dog park; an outdoor fireplace; a 20-minute walking loop; food truck space; and, of course, campus-wide Wi-Fi. But it’s not just Apollo at Rosecrans that is a major magnet. For the would-be Silicon Beach office users, South Bay is fast becoming the place to be.

“South Bay is in the process of transitioning to a much more diverse and dynamic market,” added Jordon. “It had been largely an aerospace sector for decades, but now the tenants are more reflective of tenants you see on the West Side. The whole South Bay market has changed and now you’re seeing demand from quality tenants that want to be in that location.

-Barbra Murray

Farmers Sells Westlake Village Building

San Fernando Valley Business Journal

 

As evidence of Conejo Valley’s hot market for investors, L.A.-based insurer Farmers Group Inc. has sold its building in Westlake Village for $18.6 million, according to real estate activity tracking database CoStar Realty Information Inc.

One person close to the transaction said the building was put on the market in March and garnered 20 offers – an unusually high number.

L.A.-based Black Equities Group Ltd. Bought the 64,500-square-foot Class A building at 31051 Agoura Road in Westlake Village in the Westlake Village City Center on May 12, according to CoStar. The building is leased to one of Farmers’ insurance exchanges, which is owned independently of Farmers.

CBRE Group Inc. Vice President Michael Longo, one of the brokers who represented the buyer and seller in the deal, said Westlake Village and the Conejo Valley markets are hot right now.

“Westlake Village has been the best-performing office submarket in the Conejo and San Fernando valleys over the last five years,” Longo said. “The recent investment activity in the area reflects on the health of the market as investors are drawn to Westlake’s high concentration of national corporations, excellent demographics and amenities and the overall high quality of life.”

CBRE’s Mark Perry, Carlene O'Neil, Tom Dwyer and Michael Slater also helped negotiate the deal.

-Carol Lawrence

CBRE Sells Site For $330M

Los Angeles Business Journal

 

CBRE Global Investors has sold its parent company CBRE’s headquarters in downtown for $330 million after bringing it to nearly full occupancy and making numerous renovations.

“It’s been a very, very positive outcome for CBRE Global Investors and the clients they represent,” said Lew Horne, president of the CBRE’s brokerage services for Los Angeles and Orange County.

The investment division of L.A.-based brokerage CBRE bought the 26-story site in 2012 for $238 million from Tishman Speyer of New York, when it was 81 percent leased. The building is now at 93 percent occupancy. CBRE took over the top two floors of the property in 2013, transforming a former storage space into a cutting-edge creative office. CBRE also brought in two ground-floor restaurants, enhanced the parking facilities, added a bike room, created a video conferencing center, and secured the LEED Gold environmental ranking.

The buyer is a partnership between Pittsburgh’s PNC Financial Services Group and GLL Real Estate of Munich.

“It’s another positive sign in terms of people accepting and believing what’s going on in downtown L.A.,” said Kevin Shannon, a broker who worked on the deal for CBRE with Todd Doney, John Zanatos, and Michael Longo. Shannon has since joined brokerage Newmark Grubb Knight Frank.

The building’s tenant roster that includes Capital Group Cos. Inc., O'Melveny & Myers and CBRE made it especially attractive to the buyers.

“It’s hard to find a better credit-tenant rent roll than you have a 400 S. Hope,” Shannon said.

The transaction was first reported in The Real Deal.

-Daina Beth Solomon

Argent Retail Advisors Awarded Leasing Assignment for 374k sf South Bay Center

RENTV.com

 

Stoltz Real Estate Partners has awarded Argent Retail Advisors, led by Terry Bortnick, the leasing assignment for Promenade on the Peninsula (POP), a 374.2k sf retail center in Rolling Hills Estates. Stoltz acquired the three-story, mixed-use center in 2006. Promendade on the Peninsula is noted for its gorgeous architecture with large patios and gathering areas. It is located just off the intersection of Silver Spur Road and Hawthorne Blvd at Deep Valley Drive on the Palos Verdes Peninsula, in one of Greater Los Angeles' most sought after residential areas, known for its beautiful neighborhoods, large lots and ocean views.

Promenade on the Peninsula is the focal point in the popular, mile-long commercial area of Rolling Hills Estates along Silver Spur Road. The property’s immediate trade area of 80,943 residents boasts an average household income of $163,407.

“Multi-level retail was fine when the property was originally developed, but as the market and retailing environment have evolved, the consumer has evolved as well,” said Bortnick. “To best meet the needs of our community and our tenants, the plan is underway to convert POP to mixed-use, with retail and restaurants on the ground floor and service retail, office and medical on the top floors."

Argent was hired to bring in a new wave of restaurants, retailers and service retail tenants to transition the property from a lifestyle center to a mixed-use project. They are rebranding the project with a new theme, “Health, Beauty, Fitness, Fun and Family”. The end result will provide the community a great assortment of retail, restaurant, entertainment, fitness, educational, medical and office tenants.

Anchor tenants at Promenade on the Peninsula include Regal Cinemas, Equinox Fitness, Ice Chalet, Pottery Barn. Other tenants include:

• Abercrombie & Fitch • Ann Taylor Loft • Chico’s • Crabtree & Evelyn • El Pollo Inka • Gap • Good Stuff Restaurant • J. Crew • Rubio’s Baja Grill • Ruby’s Diner • Starbucks • Talbots • Williams-Sonoma

Other desirable tenants located in adjoining properties include Bristol Farms, TJ Maxx, OSH, Pavilion’s, Petco and ULTA.

POP also benefits from being located within ten minutes of two world class facilities: Terranea, the luxury California oceanfront resort poised on 102 acres with 582 rooms, and Trump National Golf Club Los Angeles, known as the pinnacle of the luxury public golf experience with world-renowned restaurants and the spectacular panoramic Pacific Ocean views.

-Staff

Is Inclusive Internet the Future of Office?

GlobeSt.com

 

With the ubiquity of the internet, it seems that inclusive internet—an internet service included in an office or multifamily lease—is just around the corner. However, Marc Gittleman, the CEO of 5×5 Telecom, a fiber optic internet and VoIP phone company, says the concept of inclusive internet may not be good for tenants or real estate owners. The company, which was launched by Rising Realty Partners’ executives, offers built-in internet services in office buildings at a huge discount to typical providers, and while the service could be bundled into the lease package, Gittleman says that their service doesn’t preempt a tenant’s option to choose an alternate service provider.

“I am a firm believer in choice in commercial offices,” Gittleman tells GlobeSt.com. “As an owner, we get a lot of requests from different carriers, and we believe the more the merrier in terms of high-quality carriers. Tenants want choice, and they should have choice. The competition makes the market, and it is really easy for us to sell our product when we say our product is $500 and they say that their product is $1,000, and we say our product can be installed today and their product can be installed is next month. There isn’t a whole lot of actual competition going on there, but people still have a choice.”

It isn’t just the need to provide tenants with the option to choose their own carrier. Gittleman also says that it also could affect the sale of a building, especially for investors that don’t want to or don’t know how to operate a telecommunications service. “There is a very clear distinction between what is good for tenants and what is good for owners, so I stop short of saying that internet should be included in leasing. In the real estate market, you have to be able to facilitate transactions,” he says. “As a buyer of real estate, I can look at an income statement from a property and I understand parking income; I understand the janitorial expense, but if I went to sell you a building, and there was a line item that said telecom income and telecom expense, along with info on how to manage it, most sellers would not know what to do with that. It would inhibit otherwise productive transactions. While tenants should have choice, and they may or may not want it bundled in, for the near future, it is not good for the market of buying and selling property.”

But, it doesn’t only complicate the real estate transactions. Gittleman says that inclusive internet could potentially affect the value of the real estate and reduce the buyer pool. “I want to be able to get the highest and best dollar for my building, and any with respect to anyone that I am buying from, they deserve to get the highest and best dollar their building,” he explains. “For that to happen, we all have to be working with the same vocabulary and the same denominator when we are valuing a building. If we introduced some new denominator, it wouldn’t make the market more efficient, it would confuse and it would reduce the pool of potential buyers and sellers, thereby making it even less efficient.”

While a movement toward inclusive internet may not be on the horizon, Gittleman does think that landlords have an obligation give tenant’s access to the best internet services, because all tenants need the internet to run their business. “I firmly believe that every suite should be pre-connected or have the ability to be pre-connected well ahead of a tenant’s occupancy,” says Gittleman. “Internet should be like power. It is the first thing that you should bring, not the last. As a building owner, I see far too often that even sophisticated tenants fail to provision their internet service in a timely manner because they don’t realize how far in advance the lead times are. So, I do think that it should be pre-deployed.”

-Kelsi Maree Borland

Daily Brief May 23, 2016 unsubscribe

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