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Equity Office Daily Brief: May 31, 2016

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Daily Brief

May 31, 2016

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Hudson Yards, America's Largest Private Real Estate Development, Opens First Building

Forbes

 

On a sunny morning last week, a few Forbes reporters donned hard hats and neon yellow vests to tour Hudson Yards, the massive 28-acre development being constructed in one of Manhattan’s last undeveloped areas, Midtown’s far western edge. It’s the brainchild of Related Company’s...

 


How A Search For An Office Became A Multi-Million Opportunity

Forbes

 

A problem finding suitable office space was turned into a multi-million pound opportunity by entrepreneur, Alex Hoye. Hoye struggled to find a suitable office space to rent when looking for a home for Faction, his online winter-sport design and retail company. In...

 


Gensler reveals plans for 35-acre Port of L.A. Marine Research Center

Architects Newspapar

 

Gensler’s Los Angeles office has revealed plans for a $150 million expansion to the Port of Los Angeles by marine science and business innovation group AltaSea. At a ceremony hosted at the firm’s Downtown L.A. headquarters, designers at Gensler detailed a...

 


L.A. Developers Take Part in Giving to Public Art

Los Angeles Business Journal

 

Developers in Los Angeles get hit with city charges for just about everything, and as the fees have multiplied, so have developers’ frustrations. But there’s one levy that some developers have embraced: a 1 percent fee on commercial projects exceeding $500,000...

 


Buyer Doubles Down in Glendale Office Market

Los Angeles Business Journal

 

Granite Properties has purchased a 21-story Glendale office tower at 550 N. Brand Blvd. for just under $80 million, bulking up its Tri-Cities portfolio. Granite, based in Plano, Texas, now owns about 1 million square feet of offices between Glendale and...

 



BLOG & ONLINE NEWS

 

How Steep Is the Office Competition in West L.A.?

GlobeSt.com

 

To say competition is high in the West Los Angeles office market would be a gross understatement. While the market has soaring demand and is leading the greater Los Angeles area, available space is scarce and rental rates are climbing to...

 


Amazon Inks 1M-SF Industrial Lease with Goodman Group

CoStar.com

 

Goodman Group, an international industrial property group with assets under management in 16 countries valued at more than US$25 billion, has secured a long-term lease through its wholly-owned, North American subsidiary, Goodman Birtcher, with eCommerce giant Amazon for an in-development, 1.03...

 

FULL TEXT


Hudson Yards, America's Largest Private Real Estate Development, Opens First Building

Forbes

 

On a sunny morning last week, a few Forbes reporters donned hard hats and neon yellow vests to tour Hudson Yards, the massive 28-acre development being constructed in one of Manhattan’s last undeveloped areas, Midtown’s far western edge. It’s the brainchild of Related Company’s billionaire developer Stephen Ross, whose firm says it’s the largest private real estate project in the nation. Four years after breaking ground, the first building, 10 Hudson Yards, is set to open. Luxury handbag maker Coach COH -1.31%, which purchased roughly a third of the building’s space as the anchor tenant, officially started moving employees in this morning.

“For years people have been thinking about how to re-imagine Manhattan’s West Side, thinking about what it would mean to build a brand new neighborhood in New York City. And here we are today, standing in the first building of what truly will be a new city within a city,” Ross said.

The 10 Hudson Yards building is 96% leased.  Over the course of this year, six other tenants will move in, including L’Oreal USA, Boston Consulting Group , German software firm SAP, consultancy VaynerMedia, Alphabet’s (formerly Google) urban-technology subsidiary Sidewalk Labs and media-tech firm Intersection (which is partly owned by Sidewalk Labs).

In 2013 Ross told FORBES that Hudson Yards was the project he was concerned most about. “Because it’s not all about the money, really, it’s about transforming something and what you leave behind,” Ross said at the time. (For more on the history of how Hudson Yards got off the ground, read the full feature here). A lot has happened since. Related’s total real estate assets under management now top $30 billion in value, double the amount in 2012. Forbes’ estimate of Ross’ net worth has tripled from $4.5 billion when he first won the Hudson Yards bid in 2008 to an estimated $12 billion now. Plus the estimated total cost of construction for Hudson Yards has doubled to $25 billion. So far, $5 billion has been spent.

“This has been a tremendous undertaking that has required an unprecedented amount of collaboration and coordination. To have 10 million square feet of mixed-use development under construction at the same time is not an easy feat. But we knew it had to be done this way. It’s what was best for Hudson Yards and for New York City,” Ross recently told Forbes.

Hudson Yards is expected to add about $19 billion annually to New York City’s gross domestic product once the entire development is completed in 2025, according to Appleseed, a consulting firm that provides economic research to government and corporate clients. That’s 2.5% of the city’s GDP, but perhaps more notably, more than Iceland’s entire output last year. But Chief Economist for the Fiscal Policy Institute James Parrott, who had previously served as chief economist for the city’s economic development efforts, told Forbes that the Appleseed report “vastly overstates the economic impact” of Hudson Yards since it doesn’t factor in that many of the jobs eventually there will have move from other parts of the city. “It is economic analysis malpractice, at best, to assign the economic and tax streams associated with such jobs to a new project.”

Hudson Yards has already benefited from city help through the years: The No. 7 subway extension to the site, completed last year, was paid for by a $3 billion city bond offering, which also included earmarks for other infrastructure upgrades in the area. In addition, in 2005, the city designed a tax incentive for the 41-acres rezoned on Manhattan’s Westside. Hudson Yards’ 28 acres fall into that neighborhood, and so far, about $650 million in tax breaks have been awarded across the area, a Related spokeswoman confirmed. Parrott called the city’s tax break policy for the development “by far the largest and most egregious tax giveaway in the city’s history,” in a 2005 paper. He says he still estimates that the Hudson Yards tax breaks will cost the city billions in tax revenue.

The neighborhood won’t just be filled with office buildings, although there will be three fully commercial properties (10, 30, and 55 Hudson Yards). Three other mixed-use buildings will have several floors of office space as well. 30 Hudson Yards already has commitments for the entire building ahead of its 2019 open date from private equity firm KKR, Wells Fargo Securities, TimeWarner, HBO and CNN. 55 Hudson Yards, slated to open in 2018, is currently 25% leased, with commitments  from the likes of law firms Boies, Schiller & Flexner and Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy.

Ross said one of his biggest surprises has been that the office space at Hudson Yards is almost fully booked with years to go before completion. For a real estate development, that can mean the difference between struggling to continue financing construction or keeping the lights on. In comparison, the World Trade Center developments haven’t proved as popular. 4 World Trade, which opened in 2013, is 56% leased, while 3 World Trade, which is scheduled to open in 2018, is 28% committed.

“Downtown is the cheaper alternative. We’re the replacement for Midtown. If you’re a Midtown tenant, you can come over to Hudson Yards, pay Midtown rents but get state-of-the-art buildings in a more dynamic neighborhood,” says Jay Cross, president of Related Hudson Yards.

Aside from the roughly 8 million square feet of office space at Hudson Yards, Ross’s plan also includes a 1 million square-foot mall, similar to his TimeWarner Center development on Columbus Circle. It will have dozens of shops, anchored by New York City’s first Neiman Marcus, as well as restaurants by famed chefs Thomas Keller, José Andrés and Costas Spiliadis. The project will also feature 4,000 residences – a mix of owned units and rentals – a public school for 750 students, a public arts center and 14 acres of open space. Related estimates that come 2025, about 125,000 people will come through the neighborhood every day, including residents, worker and visitors.

Hudson Yards is also planning a 200-room hotel branded with the luxury fitness company Equinox, of which Ross and other Related executives are part owners. It’s slated to open in 2015, and is one of three Equinox hotels in the works. The others are planned for Los Angeles and Chicago.

“Cities have to reinvent themselves,” Cross says. “The fact that we really need new office space and we always need housing and now on the West side, we need retail, there are compelling demographic reasons that fed all of the components. And that’s why I think, ultimately, we’ll be very successful.”

-Chloe Sorvino

How A Search For An Office Became A Multi-Million Opportunity

Forbes

 

A problem finding suitable office space was turned into a multi-million pound opportunity by entrepreneur, Alex Hoye.

Hoye struggled to find a suitable office space to rent when looking for a home for Faction, his online winter-sport design and retail company. In order to get a certain level of quality and amenities, you often need to take a certain minimum size. But as a small digital startup, Faction did not require the kind of space needed to secure a good office, says Hoye.

As a result, and somewhat on a whim, Hoye took a significantly larger space in a office block near London’s Silicon Roundabout (Old Street) and created a pop-up co-working space called Runway East. The co-working space proved to be a success and Hoye moved it, along with Faction, to a new, more permanent location a few hundred meters away.

The new space also proved successful and a second larger location is set to open before August this year. In total the two spaces should have enough room for 600 people to work The current space is open-plan, although there are opportunities for larger companies and ones that want separate areas coming, says Hoye.

“For a relatively small company it’s difficult for managers to try and manage functional needs on top of everything else. That’s why it’s great to have some of those communal efforts taken care of by environment you’re in,” he explains.

The co-working space operates a membership business model. Companies can negotiate a set area based on how many people they employ. Currently, there are 24 companies with 180 members between them working in the space.

“We just need to talk to the companies and keep an eye on their expected growth so we know what’s coming. It involves playing Tetris a bit but we get every company to fit in ,” he adds.

The membership model takes payment monthly and has resulted in revenue between £1 and £10 million per year. Turnover is also helpfully quite low – making the business something of a safe cashcow in the startup world. “We’ve been around for two years now and turnover is incredibly low. One company did get bought and left,” says Hoye.

Growth is also slow but steady. At the moment most new members are referrals from current tenants. There’s not so much churn at the moment and Runway East gets much of its current capacity filled through recommendations for current tenants – which is why it needs the new building to expand, he adds. With tenants such as Winnow Solutions recently winning awards, there may be a further pickup in membership in the near future.

-Freddie Dawson

Gensler reveals plans for 35-acre Port of L.A. Marine Research Center

Architects Newspapar

 

Gensler’s Los Angeles office has revealed plans for a $150 million expansion to the Port of Los Angeles by marine science and business innovation group AltaSea. At a ceremony hosted at the firm’s Downtown L.A. headquarters, designers at Gensler detailed a 280,000 square foot facility encompassing a new waterfront promenade, aquaculture research center, and science hub set 35-acre stretch of historical docks and waterfront spaces. The project combines the adaptive reuse of existing dockside warehouses with the construction of a new visitor’s center and signal-house.

Three formerly industrial warehouse shells, exposed composite steel beams, and original overhead trusses will house dedicated research and business development facilities for aquaculture and underwater robotics endeavors. The project’s development will be divided into phases beginning with the redevelopment of Warehouses 58 through 60, which will add 180,000 square feet of combined research and business hubs to the site. This phase also incorporates an education pavilion and wharf plaza into the mix. The second and third phases entail renovating Warehouse 57—which will contain 60,000 square feet of laboratory and classroom space—and the construction of the site’s two new structures. 

Those new constructions, Berth 56 and a tower dubbed “the Viewing Structure,” are located between the arms of the two docks housing the science warehouse spaces. Berth 56 is a  landscape-oriented community center with educational and exhibition spaces, as well as amenities like viewing platforms and a theater. The 5-story viewing tower is located at the foot of a Berth 56’s roof terrace, which has been sculpted to blend with a street-level plaza.

After citing the prominence of tower structures in the port’s historical development, Li Wen, Design Director at Gensler, described the firm’s approach with the new tower as an attempt to, “make a place with a new, 21st century tower that’s all about sustainability. So instead of emitting light, this tower actually harvests energy.”

The overall scheme is an attempt to create a closed loop of scientific discovery, product innovation, and entrepreneurial commercialization at AltaSea’s campus. It is also being designed to be “net-positive” by generating more energy, through tidal, wind, and solar generation, than it consumes. Gensler expects to begin construction on the first phase of the project in 2016 with the community center set to open in 2023.

-Antonio Pacheco

L.A. Developers Take Part in Giving to Public Art

Los Angeles Business Journal

 

Developers in Los Angeles get hit with city charges for just about everything, and as the fees have multiplied, so have developers’ frustrations. But there’s one levy that some developers have embraced: a 1 percent fee on commercial projects exceeding $500,000 in value that is applied to fund public art projects.

Kilroy Realty Corp. of West Long Angeles is one of those developers. Last fall at its Columbia Square project in Hollywood, Kilroy unveiled a public art installation: a row of translucent panels featuring human figures by celebrity artist Dustin Yellin.

Kilroy was only obligated under the city’s 1 percent for public art mandate to pay about $600,000 for the work, but the developer ended up spending nearly double that to make sure it could be displayed to maximum effect – and spent the extra money willingly.

“We wanted to do more than just fulfill the funding requirement,” said Lauren Phillips, Kilroy’s director of construction services. “We wanted to bring something new and exciting to the project and have the art make as much impact as possible.”

The Columbia Square panels are among the more recent of several hundred public art displays around Los Angeles made possible by the city’s 1 percent mandate. Established in 1989, it’s one of the oldest in the country – and regarded as one of the better run programs with dozens of local artists as frequent participants.

According to the Cultural Affairs Department, the mandate has generated roughly $35 million for public art over the past decade. No cumulative figures were available for the total number of public art installations and programs funded, though department staff said the agency had completed 66 art projects that it managed over the past four years.

Los Angeles is not alone – 32 other cities in Los Angeles County have a levy for public art mandates, according to a 2011 report from the Los Angeles County Arts Commission. Of those, Culver City’s is the oldest, established in 1988. Other cities that have since set up programs include Alhambra, Long Beach, Beverly Hills, Santa Monica, Glendale, and Westlake Village.

Most of the other cities have a 1 percent set-aside requirement, though a few have slightly higher or lower percentages.

Malibu fine art consultant DeeDee Postil said that while the programs in these cities generally don’t have major problems, few match up to the quality and breadth of art and level of experience in Los Angeles.

“The city of Los Angeles has really emerged as the gold standard among these programs,” she said.

Increased involvement

In Los Angeles, the mandate is limited to commercial developments (in mixed-use projects, only the commercial component, not the residential). Developers have three choices: They can turn the funds over to the city’s Cultural Affairs Department and leave all the work to the city; they can hire their own team to select the artist and plan the installation; or they can work in tandem with the city.

In the mandate’s early days, many developers simply paid their fees to the city and wanted little more to do with it, according to Edward Goldman, a local art critic. Department of Cultural Affairs staff would then choose the artists and find nearby sites to place the art.

That practice has changed over time as more developers have taken it upon themselves – and hired consultants – to select artists and prepare their project sites.

Initially, some developers had to be dragged into the process, fearful that they might run into bureaucratic delays that could postpone the opening of their project, according to Michelle Isenberg, a local fine art consultant who has worked on percent for public art projects in downtown Los Angeles and Culver City, at Los Angeles International Airport, and elsewhere. Isenberg is advising Chinese developer Greenland USA on its public art installation at downtown’s Metropolis project and Korean Air Lines on its Wilshire Grand development.

More recently, though, as word has spread that delays are infrequent and city staff are relatively accommodating, an increasing number of developers have taken on the tasks themselves.

“The developer experience has opened up; early on it was really difficult,” Isenberg said. “There were lots of location and medium restrictions; those have loosened up over the years. Now, L.A. is considered a national leader in percent for public art programs.”

-Howard Fine

Buyer Doubles Down in Glendale Office Market

Los Angeles Business Journal

 

Granite Properties has purchased a 21-story Glendale office tower at 550 N. Brand Blvd. for just under $80 million, bulking up its Tri-Cities portfolio. Granite, based in Plano, Texas, now owns about 1 million square feet of offices between Glendale and Burbank, including the Brand Boulevard neighbor of its newest purchase.

“We’ve had great success next door,” said Tom Miller, Granite’s managing director, referring to the building acquired three years ago for $95 million. “Glendale has a great, great economic location with all the retail and multifamily growth that’s going on.”

The price for the 304,503-square-foot Class A building translated to about $262 a square foot, far below rates for top-tier buildings in hot markets such as the Westside and downtown Los Angeles. Two of the biggest tenants are the federal government and National TeleConsultants, a technology consultancy, followed by law and accounting firms.

Granite will upgrade the lobbies, halls, and patios, but don’t call it a “creative office” redesign.

“I think of it as next-generation space,” said Miller. “We’re certainly going to make it as attractive a space is available in the market.”

Jones Lang LaSalle will continue providing the building’s leasing services, and Granite will run management operations.

Manhattan Beach Spruce Up

Manhattan Village is taking a page from the Rick Caruso playbook.

Just as Caruso has attracted crowds of shoppers with his open-air plazas, the Manhattan Beach shopping center will begin a major expansion next month.

Following the lead of many L.A.-area malls, owner RREEF America, part of Deutsche Asset & Wealth Management, plans on spending a reported $150 million to spruce up its 44-acre campus with a larger outdoor shopping zone as well as renovations to the interior.

JLL is spearheading the upgrades and leasing effort.

Manhattan Village’s new outdoor zone, meant to seamlessly connect with the existing mall, will include a central patio and walkways lined with drought-tolerant plants, fountains, and string lights.

Macy’s Inc. is consolidating into a single 168,000-square-foot space, combining departments that are on opposite ends of the mall. The move comes as Macy’s is in the process of closing 40 stores after reporting a 31 percent drop in earnings last quarter.

The consolidation will leave room for a new anchor tenant, and JLL is scouting for an upscale department store or “an experiential and/or entertainment venue that the Beach Cities community will enjoy,” according to the Manhattan Village website.

Manhattan Village’s current tenants include Apple Inc., Pottery Barn, Sephora USA Inc., and California Pizza Kitchen.

Ocean Views

A 90-unit apartment building painted in sea-foam green and periwinkle, a few miles from the Palos Verdes beach, has been sold for $40 million.

The complex was built in the early 1970s but extensively renovated in the past few years. Vista Catalina now fetches rents beginning at $2,295 a month for one-bedroom units, according to CoStar Group Inc.

The seller, Marcus & Millichap’s Institutional Property Advisors, nailed a price that translated to more than $445,000 a unit. The buyer was G&G Enterprises of Wilmington.

“The community is a cliffside retreat perched atop the Rancho Palos Verdes bluffs,” said Paul Darrow, an IPA director, in a statement. “Eighty-eight units have been renovated with high-end finishes and most have ocean views.”

The 143,388-square-foot building last traded hands in 2013 for $35.8 million.

Forward Thinking

One of L.A.’s first creative-office conversions is still keeping up with the times.

A former manufacturing building on Sepulveda Boulevard near the interchange of the 405 and 10 freeways will continue to be home for mOcean. The ad agency, represented by Savills Studley, just renewed its lease for 28,300 square feet.

“The property’s innovative setting … supports mOcean’s mission to continue developing breakthrough campaigns for forward-thinking clients,” said John Bertram, executive managing director at Savills Studley, in a statement.

The 200,000-square-foot building has been owned by Harvey Capital Corp. since 2011. Other tenants include Neural Analytics, the National Genetics Institute, and Revelations Entertainment, according to CoStar. The property, between Anawalt Lumber and Party City, became an office space in the 1990s.

-Staff Reporter Daina Beth Solomon can be a reached at dsolomon@labusinessjournal.com or (323) 556-8337.

How Steep Is the Office Competition in West L.A.?

GlobeSt.com

 

To say competition is high in the West Los Angeles office market would be a gross understatement. While the market has soaring demand and is leading the greater Los Angeles area, available space is scarce and rental rates are climbing to historic highs. To find an office space in this market, tenants should expect to start looking at least six months before their current lease turns and be willing to pay.

“We have had explosive rent growth, and the rents have been explosive because there is no space,” Aleks Trifunovic, president of Lee & Associates West L.A., tells GlobeSt.com in this exclusive story. “If you wanted 10,000 square feet of office space, off the top of my head, I couldn’t think of a single space that is available right now.” He uses the example of a traditional office building in at 501 Santa Monica Blvd. that leased for $2.75 in 2010 and a recent lease at the same building was done a $5.85 per square foot.

Trifunovic says that the competition is so tight in the market for space, rental rates seem to not be an issue anymore. Tenants are more concerned with finding the space they need in the market that they want rather than at the right rate. “The dynamic that we have seen in West L.A. is that the rental rate isn’t as significant anymore,” he says. “If you are pumping in 5 per 1,000 in terms of occupancy, you are getting so much more activity out of the space that the rent isn’t as big as an issue. If you ask someone for 70,000 square feet and the rent is $5.25, that doesn’t matter as much as the fact that there is a 70,000-square-foot space that they can rent.”

As a result, some companies aren’t looking at rental rates any longer, but are now calculating space by revenue generated. “A lot of companies are looking at their revenue per square foot, not their cost per square foot, and businesses have shifted toward that model,” says Trifunovic. “That has been a big item for West L.A.”

This isn’t only a problem for larger blocks of space. Smaller companies are also struggling to find small floor plates for their business, and Trifunovic says that product less than 5,000 square feet is just as scarce and expensive. “We have had competitive situations in almost every lease that we have had,” he explains. “We had a lull at the start of this year from January to February, and I thought we were in a recession. On March 1st, we had a building in Culver City with five proposals and three unsolicited proposals to purchase the building, and we are over asking now. You had a lull, and then it started to take off again.”

As a result of the high demand, investors and developers are pushing rates for all types of office space, from high-end creative office to traditional or secondary office spaces. “Right now, even the secondary space has been doing very well in the marketplace, and we have been pushing rates,” Trifunovic says. “These developers have come in and underwritten a higher rent. They have really pushed the market and have been able to get to their numbers.”

-Kelsi Maree Borland

Amazon Inks 1M-SF Industrial Lease with Goodman Group

CoStar.com

 

Goodman Group, an international industrial property group with assets under management in 16 countries valued at more than US$25 billion, has secured a long-term lease through its wholly-owned, North American subsidiary, Goodman Birtcher, with eCommerce giant Amazon for an in-development, 1.03 million-square-foot distribution building.

Bldg. B is expected to deliver in fall 2016 at 4880 Hamner Rd. in Eastvale, CA, directly off the Cantu-Galleano Ranch Road exit of the I-15 in the Riverside County submarket of the Inland Empire.

"Ecommerce logistics requires strategic locations with innovative design to help our customers efficiently process, sort and distribute goods to their demanding online customers," said Greg Goodman, CEO of Goodman Group. "As a leader in ecommerce logistics design, Goodman is distinguished by its property management services, enabling customers to modify and upgrade the property to stay competitive in a fast-moving industry."

The facility will be the first of two 1 million-square-foot buildings constructed by Goodman Birtcher as part of its 205-acre, mixed-use Goodman Commerce Center Eastvale development. With this lease in place, Goodman Birtcher plans to move ahead with construction of Bldg. A at 4890 Hamner Rd., with an anticipated delivery date in early 2017. When completed, the campus will offer various space options including distribution, business center, retail and medical office space. We are delighted to complete this leasing deal with Amazon and welcome them to Goodman Commerce Center Eastvale," said Brandon Birtcher, CEO of Goodman Birtcher, which currently has $2.3 billion in its U.S. development pipeline that will add some 17.7 million square feet of class A logistics space. "Amazon found our state-of-the-art logistics center a good match for its operational requirements."

McWilliams and Michael McCrary with JLL represented the landlord in lease negotiations, and are marketing Bldg. A for lease along with Timothy O'Rourke and Michael Fowler of JLL. Philip Lombardo at Cushman & Wakefield represented the tenant in lease negotiations.

-Staff

Daily Brief May 31, 2016 unsubscribe

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