Spamdex - Spam Archive

Report spam

Send in your spam and get the offenders listed

Create a rule in outlook or simply forward the spam you receive to questions@spamdex.co.uk

Also in myequityoffice.com

Equity Office Daily Brief: September 6, 2016

Can't see content of this e-mail? Click HERE for browser version.
Daily Brief

September 06, 2016

  EquilityOffice

PRINT NEWS

 

Reaching High Into the Western Sky

Wall Street Journal

 

A new skyscraper in downtown Los Angeles has become the tallest building in the U.S. west of the Mississippi River. Construction workers on Saturday placed a 10-ton spire atop the Wilshire Grand Tower. The spire adds 160 feet to the 73-story building....

 


Property Investors Are Obsessed With the A/C in Your Office

National Real Estate Investor

 

Real estate investors might have more reason to care about the air conditioning in your office than you do. As energy-related emissions from buildings creep higher, property investors are starting to worry that regulators and politicians will come down hard on the...

 


Economy Watch: Solid Construction Spending for Offices, Hotels

Commercial Property Executive

 

Spending on U.S. construction projects was higher this July than last, largely due to growth in the private sector.construction spending during July 2016 came in at an annualized rate of $1,153.2 billion, nearly the same as the revised June estimate, which...

 


SPECIAL REPORT: William Shopoff

Los Angeles Business Journal

 

Why invest in Inglewood? We were drawn to Inglewood by another investment opportunity that allowed us to evaluate additional sites. We had encouraging conversations with Mayor (James) Butts and introductions in the community and felt the then-Hollywood Park Tomorrow project (prestadium) would...

 


SPECIAL REPORT: Hitting The Field

Los Angeles Business Journal

 

While sports fans are excited about football’s return to Los Angeles and a forthcoming stadium in Inglewood, real estate industry players are capitalizing on the momentum by filling the untapped market for housing, offices, retailers, and entertainment venues in the city. The...

 


Nontraditional Gets Workout

Los Angeles Business Journal

 

It’s an astounding number: as many as one in five workers in Los Angeles County – upward of 1 million people – work in nontraditional jobs, either as self-employed or contingent workers or as part of the underground cash economy. These workers...

 



BLOG & ONLINE NEWS

 

McCormick Construction Completes Trio of Parking Structure Projects in Burbank

RENTV.com

 

McCormick Construction recently completed three Parking structure development projects, totaling 464.8k sf and 1,412 parking stalls in Burbank. The private structures will provide ample parking for employees of the Nickelodeon Animation Studio, Contract Services Administration Trust Fund (CSATF) and 800 S....

 


CBRE Hotels' Thomas Callahan Dies At 61

Bisnow

 

CBRE Hotels' Thomas Callahan died last week after battling cancer, the company announced yesterday. He was 61. “Tom was a guiding force with PKF Consulting USA and an integral part of CBRE Hotels. Moreover, he was a great friend to many...

 


See the unique-looking office tower coming to Miracle Mile

Curbed LA

 

More big changes are coming to Miracle Mile. Directly across from the La Brea Tar Pits, J.H. Snyder Company is planning to start construction early next year on a 12-story office building. The Beverly Press reported this week that the...

 


Why I Created a Shared Work Space for Self-Employed People

Sixth Tone

 

I worked in architectural design for almost ten years before launching my own business. The first time I realized that it may be time to change careers was actually at an interview. Although I wasn’t offered the job, the interviewer told...

 


The Slowdown of Jobs Gained in August Could Hinder the Fed's Move for a Rate Hike

Bisnow

 

August’s payroll gain was a slowdown from July’s job gains, causing economists to wonder how the Federal Reserve will interpret those numbers. Employers added 151,000 jobs in August, a drop from the more than 270,000 jobs added in the previous two months....

 


Foreign investors still love U.S. commercial real estate

REJournals.com

 

It should come as no surprise to anyone working in the business today that foreign investors look at commercial real estate as one of the smartest places for their dollars. There is plenty of uncertainty across the globe. But commercial properties in...

 

FULL TEXT


Reaching High Into the Western Sky

Wall Street Journal

 

A new skyscraper in downtown Los Angeles has become the tallest building in the U.S. west of the Mississippi River.

Construction workers on Saturday placed a 10-ton spire atop the Wilshire Grand Tower. The spire adds 160 feet to the 73-story building. That makes it 1,099 feet high.

That’s 81 feet higher than nearby U.S. Bank Tower, which held the tallest U.S. building record west of the Mississippi since 1989.

The Wilshire Grand still has some construction work scheduled. The $1 billion hotel and office complex is scheduled to open next March.

—Associated Press

Property Investors Are Obsessed With the A/C in Your Office

National Real Estate Investor

 

Real estate investors might have more reason to care about the air conditioning in your office than you do.

As energy-related emissions from buildings creep higher, property investors are starting to worry that regulators and politicians will come down hard on the sector for its contribution to climate change.

PGGM, the second-largest Dutch pension fund manager, said it’s working to cut in half the carbon footprint of the $22 billion euros ($25 billion) in real-estate investments it manages before 2020. “Our pension is worth more in the future in a liveable world,” said Mathieu Elshout, director of private real estate at PGGM Investments. “The sooner we start with it, the better.”

Studies have shown energy-efficient buildings also make for good investments. Real estate investment trusts that rank better in a measure of sustainability generally have better financial performance, according to a 2015 University of Cambridge paper.

But how do you determine the relative carbon impact of a real-estate portfolio, which could include properties as diverse as low-energy (and low-earning) warehouses and energy-guzzling data centers?

GeoPhy, a property data-analytics firm, does it by directly comparing how much carbon a property produces per dollar of rent revenue it generates. GeoPhy calculated the carbon footprint of 50 of the largest REITs by market cap in its database of 900 listed companies in the sector worldwide, exclusively for Bloomberg.

The top five best performers own newer, better-designed buildings, GeoPhy founder and CEO Teun van den Dries said. And green buildings tend to be in better locations, which could explain the higher rents, he said.

“What we do see is a strong brown discount, showing a steep drop in value for older and poorer buildings,” he said.

At the bottom of the barrel was Digital Realty Trust, a San Francisco-based owner and operator of data centers—an industry where the emissions footprint is growing. The company said it was working on its environmental performance and had reduced the carbon footprint of its data centers by 6 percent in 2015, despite its customers’ energy use growing by 16 percent.

REITs with properties in areas where coal still plays a large role in energy generation had a relatively high footprint, van den Dries said. “The location of the building is actually a key driver,” he said. “If you’re in Texas, the carbon intensity is completely different than if you’re in New York state.”

Buildings accounted for 32 percent of final global energy use and 19 percent of energy-related greenhouse gas emissions in 2010, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s latest global warming assessment report, published in 2014. That’s thanks to a lot of air conditioning, heating, lighting and electrical equipment.

The panel’s report—which is used as the scientific basis for international climate negotiations—says those figures may double or even triple by the middle of the century as global standards of living improve and the world population increases.

REITs face major challenges. One of the biggest obstacles: They often don’t have a lot of control over how much power a building consumes. In a shopping mall, for instance, a landlord may manage the energy use of common areas but tenant retailers are in charge of their own electricity consumption.

Tenants are responsible for about 80 percent of emissions linked to properties owned by Kimco Realty Corp., the biggest U.S. owner of shopping centers, said Will Teichman, who is responsible for the company’s sustainability efforts.

-To contact the author of this story: Siobhan Wagner in London at swagner33@bloomberg.net To contact the editor responsible for this story: Lisa Fleisher at lfleisher2@bloomberg.net

Economy Watch: Solid Construction Spending for Offices, Hotels

Commercial Property Executive

 

Spending on U.S. construction projects was higher this July than last, largely due to growth in the private sector.construction spending during July 2016 came in at an annualized rate of $1,153.2 billion, nearly the same as the revised June estimate, which was $1,153.5 billion, the Census Bureau reported ahead of the Labor Day holiday. Even so, the July 2016 figure is 1.5 percent higher than the July 2015 construction spending total.

Such growth as there was in July was due to spending on private construction projects, which was up 1 percent compared to the revised June total. Public construction spending, by contrast, was down for the month by 3.1 percent. For the year, private construction spending gained 4.4 percent, while public spending dropped 6.5 percent.

In the private sector, residential construction spending was up 1.9 percent for the year, with multifamily construction leading the way with a gain of 19.8 percent (though the volatile sector dropped 0.6 percent for the month). The more stable single-family housing sector saw construction spending rise 1.7 percent year-over-year, but fall 0.2 percent for the month.

In the private non-residential sector, spending on office projects—the strongest property type in terms of construction spending—gained 30.3 percent for the year and 4.6 percent for the month. Spending on lodging likewise was significantly up for the year as demand for new hotels and motels grew, up 28 percent, but down 1.2 percent for the month.

-Dees Stribling

SPECIAL REPORT: William Shopoff

Los Angeles Business Journal

 

Why invest in Inglewood?

We were drawn to Inglewood by another investment opportunity that allowed us to evaluate additional sites. We had encouraging conversations with Mayor (James) Butts and introductions in the community and felt the then-Hollywood Park Tomorrow project (prestadium) would generate positive change. We identified the Daniel Freeman hospital site at the corner of Prairie Avenue and Grace Street as an excellent Inglewood location. The site has proximity to light rail with a new station under construction a few blocks away, Los Angeles International Airport, freeway connections, and a large job market. The 18?acre property has an optimal size and configuration for a successful transit?oriented residential development.

What projects prepared you to take on this development?

Our Uptown Newport project in Newport Beach and our Platinum Gateway and Vista projects in Anaheim.

You began planning this prior to the stadium confirmation. Has the news of the stadium changed your plans?

The news of the stadium confirms that Inglewood is experiencing an extraordinary urban renaissance of which our project is a valuable part.

What are your biggest challenges?

Community stakeholders are often uneasy with the prospect of change. We spend a significant amount of time reaching out to our neighbors, listening to their concerns and ideas, and then incorporating the best ideas into our plans. We spent several months conducting meetings with our neighbors and other stakeholders and made significant changes to the plan in positive response. As Mayor Butts noted at our final approval hearing, he and the Inglewood community were grateful for our efforts, which also includes preservation and protection of the Moreton Bay fig tree planted on the Daniel Freeman estate by the city’s founder over 100 years ago.

-Daina Beth Solomon

SPECIAL REPORT: Hitting The Field

Los Angeles Business Journal

 

While sports fans are excited about football’s return to Los Angeles and a forthcoming stadium in Inglewood, real estate industry players are capitalizing on the momentum by filling the untapped market for housing, offices, retailers, and entertainment venues in the city.

The projects, some underway and others on the drawing board, have the potential to transform Inglewood into an investor’s darling just a few years after the city hovered on the brink of bankruptcy.

Stan Kroenke’s Hollywood Park Land Co. is poised to anchor the changes with an estimated $2 billion stadium that will leap onto the world stage when it hosts the Super Bowl in 2021. A theater, hotel, office campus, shopping and dining district, and parks will fill the rest of the 300-acre site. The restored Forum opened next door in 2014, and the revamped Hollywood Park Casino is scheduled to reopen this fall. A 300-home project is in the works across the street, and plans are in progress to build a mixed-use development at the end of Market Street in Inglewood’s downtown. The Crenshaw-LAX light-rail line is slated to tie things together with three stations opening in the city.

Inglewood Mayor James Butts sees the Forum’s packed calendar as a sign of domino effect already underway.

“Entertainment is a key element of cities that are going to prosper,” he said. “If you have entertainment, you have people and cars. With people and cars come cash, credit cards, and debit cards.”

Hollywood Park is poised to be another catalyst as the largest privately financed construction project in the United States.

“There will be thousands of jobs and billions of local spending in Inglewood that would not have occurred if the dying horseracing business at Hollywood Park had been left intact,” said Terry Fancher, executive managing director at Stockbridge Capital Partners, a partner in Hollywood Park Land.

But developers haven’t been able to spike the ball just yet: One remaining challenge is ensuring that people visit Inglewood more than the roughly 10 days a year that the Los Angeles Rams will play each season. Even if the San Diego Chargers choose to join the team in the stadium, the number of game days would only reach 20.

“They really need to focus on what’s going to draw people outside of the stadium,” said Joe Clarke, director of commercial real estate at Keller Williams Silicon Beach. The developments should also be in sync with the needs of long-established families and businesses.

Getting the recipe right might just be a matter of time. Real estate professionals in local markets expect Hollywood Park’s proposed 2,500 housing units to be an important draw given the rising rents and house prices in Westside and South Bay neighborhoods.

“You’ll find professionals interested in being able to buy or rent something new and contemporary, with a parking garage, landscaped streets, and the lake,” said Bob Healey, a CBRE senior vice president. “It’s the biggest thing to happen in L.A. since Playa Vista.”

Office tenants, in turn, might be eager to nab one of the few sites in Los Angeles that would provide newly built housing, shopping, and dining within a walk or a bike ride. The opportunity to lease within Hollywood Park’s 780,000-square-foot office complex comes as Westside companies have been squeezed by Silicon Beach’s high rents and quickly evaporating space.

Kevin Demoff, chief operating officer for the Rams, said companies are already expressing interest, particularly to join Kroenke’s vision for Inglewood as a whole.

“We’ve had a number of conversations with people talking about moving their headquarters,” he said in a recent interview.

While retail leases have yet to be inked, CBRE Vice President Jamie Brooks said the shopping area would resemble Santa Monica’s Third Street Promenade or Glendale’s Americana at Brand.

Inglewood can already count on its proximity to the beach, the airport, and neighborhoods stretching across the Westside and even to downtown Los Angeles.

“It didn’t become a good real estate play because of football,” Brooks said. “It’s always had potential.”

-Diana Beth Solomon

Nontraditional Gets Workout

Los Angeles Business Journal

 

It’s an astounding number: as many as one in five workers in Los Angeles County – upward of 1 million people – work in nontraditional jobs, either as self-employed or contingent workers or as part of the underground cash economy.

These workers can be found everywhere – from writers, actors, and postproduction specialists in the entertainment industry to truck drivers at the ports, real estate agents, gardeners, and a small but growing contingent of workers with “gigs” in the sharing economy.

Indeed, with its concentrations in the creative/entertainment industries and the goods movement sector, the county is one of the leading centers in the nation for these nontraditional jobs. U.S. Census Bureau figures show the county has a slightly higher percentage of self-employed positions than California and roughly 50 percent higher than the national average.

“If California is on fast-forward, then L.A. is on steroids when it comes to the contingent workforce,” said Manuel Pastor, professor of sociology, American studies, and ethnicity at USC’s Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.

For those seeing the glass as half-full, a major factor behind the huge number of self-employed workers is L.A.’s reputation as a magnet for immigrants-turned-entrepreneurs. Many immigrants who start out on their own eventually progress to open their own businesses.

“Southern California is thought of as hotbed of entrepreneurship; this high percentage of self-employed aligns with that,” said Robert Kleinhenz, an economist with Beacon Economics in Los Angeles and former chief economist with the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp.

But for those seeing the glass as half-empty, the county is awash in low-wage workers who have little choice but to accept work earning less as independent contractors. And the employers who pay them have flocked to the independent contractor model as a way to save money.

“When not putting workers on payrolls becomes the dominant model in a geographic area or industry, it’s hard for workers to break out of that,” said Dan Flaming, president of the Economic Roundtable, a downtown nonprofit research organization with ties to social justice groups.

Hard to track

By its very nature, contingency and self-employed work is hard to track. Estimates vary, starting on the low end at about 430,000 workers in the county, or 9.3 percent of a workforce of 4.5 million, which is based on the Census Bureau’s most recent American Community Survey of self-employed in 2014. That puts Los Angeles 50 percent higher than the national average of 6.1 percent.

But local economists say this 430,000 figure drastically undercounts the contingency/self-employed workforce.

Beacon’s Kleinhenz said the Census Bureau data does not include sole proprietors who have incorporated their own businesses. He said factoring those workers in could add as many as 400,000 to the ranks of the contingency/self-employed, putting the total closer to 830,000.

The Economic Roundtable’s Flaming goes even higher. He cites data from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis that show more people working in the county than other government agencies have tracked, with the vast majority of those additional people not showing up on employer payrolls. As a result, in a 2013 report for a local carpenters union, he put the number of contingency/self-employed workers at about 950,000, or roughly 19 percent of the total workforce.

Flaming said that percentage had grown from about 17 percent when he looked at the issue a few years earlier and that it is likely still creeping up.

And none of these estimates completely accounts for workers in the underground or cash economy, such as many gardeners and housekeepers, or those involved in illicit trades such as selling drugs and prostitution.

Big impact

Whatever the number, it’s having a substantial impact on the local economy. One major characteristic of self-employed or contingent workers is that the work is temporary in nature: They move from project to project, client to client, or even job to job. And that can create a more unstable workforce that is less willing to commit to major purchases such as homes.

“In many cases, there is a greater amount of uncertainty about your livelihood and your household’s financial well-being,” Kleinhenz said.

This is most acute, he said, among workers who have become part of the self-employed/contingency workforce involuntarily, either through being laid off from traditional full-time payroll jobs or working in industries where such jobs are scarce.

The other major characteristic is that these workers are generally responsible for paying their own taxes and benefits. That can make the final “take-home” paycheck smaller than one from a payroll job.

“Our social systems are not well-geared toward this new evolution,” said USC’s Pastor. “Employees who receive 1099 forms are not eligible for unemployment insurance, they have to rely on Obamacare and they generally can’t even invest in the company 401(k) plan.”

Of course, not all workers in this segment are struggling. Real estate agents selling high-end homes, A-list actors, and professionals with high-end clientele can take home hefty payouts and can enjoy some of the freedoms, such as setting their own hours and working conditions.

Key industries

One reason the county has become a leader in this contingent/self-employed workforce is the dominance of two industries that rely heavily on this model: the entertainment sector and goods movement.

The entertainment industry gradually adopted this model as the old studio system broke down in the 1960s and 1970s, with actors, writers, and directors essentially becoming independent contractors. It spread to production and postproduction houses as well as other “below the line” workers.

A 2015 report on the creative economy from the Otis College of Art and Design in Westchester found there were 166,000 “nonemployee establishments” in L.A.’s creative economy, with the vast majority of those in the film and TV sector.

“We’re seeing this number of contingent workers increase, particularly at smaller companies because it’s less overhead,” Kathleen Milnes, chief executive of the Entertainment Economy Institute and a professor of digital media at Otis. “It’s an efficient and cost-effective way of running a business that has huge swings in work.”

In the goods movement sector, the independent contractor model is especially widespread among truckers operating at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. The model got a jumpstart at the ports after the trucking industry was deregulated in the 1980s. Weston LaBar, president of the Harbor Trucking Association in Long Beach, said 90 percent of the 12,000 truck drivers working at the ports today are independent contractors. He cited the same peak-and-valley factor for work as the reason the trucking companies have adopted this model.

“For a company, this allows them to flex up very quickly when a lot of cargo comes in, while avoiding drivers just sitting around when cargo is light,” he said.

He said most truck drivers prefer the independent contractor model because it offers higher take-home pay; some even use it as a way to acquire more trucks and start their own trucking companies.

It is a view that is hotly contested by union leaders, who say truck drivers make less money as independent contractors and that the trucking companies are skirting federal and state laws by keeping them as contractors instead of putting the drivers on their payrolls. The courts have sided with drivers seeking full-time status in a series of recent decisions, and some trucking companies have filed for bankruptcy protection as a result.

Wage increases

Another factor could reshape this contingent workforce, especially among lower-wage workers: the state and local increases in the minimum wage. The conventional view is that as the minimum wage increases, restaurants and other hard-hit companies might be more tempted to convert some or most of their workers to independent contractors to lower their costs, even if such a move would violate state and federal laws.

But the Economic Roundtable’s Flaming said the trend might go the other way, because along with the minimum-wage increases, the city and county of Los Angeles are setting up enforcement offices to make sure employers comply with the pay raises.

“Right now, federal and state agencies are so overwhelmed with complaints over misclassification that they are very slow to act,” he said. “I believe that as these local wage enforcement offices gear up, they will move more aggressively in this area and you will start to see employers who had been classifying their workers as independent contractors put them back on their payrolls.”

-Howard Fine

McCormick Construction Completes Trio of Parking Structure Projects in Burbank

RENTV.com

 

McCormick Construction recently completed three Parking structure development projects, totaling 464.8k sf and 1,412 parking stalls in Burbank. The private structures will provide ample parking for employees of the Nickelodeon Animation Studio, Contract Services Administration Trust Fund (CSATF) and 800 S. Flower St.

“Parking, especially in Los Angeles County, has become a driving force behind not only determining the size and scale of the potential project, but how successful the development can be,” said Michael McCormick, president and CEO of McCormick Construction. “It is essential for project owners and developers to include parking options in their design-build projects in order to optimize space, time and cultivate a cohesive aesthetic between the building and its parking.”

Situated on Lake and Olive streets, Nickelodeon Animation Studio’s 450-stall, 129k sf, five-story parking garage is a design-assist with Clark Pacific, DLR Group and Englekirk and will serve the company’s employees at the newly located Animation group. By utilizing the precast concrete system, McCormick improved the project’s time- and cost-efficiency, creating substantial savings. In addition, McCormick streamlined a number of processes which limited the amount of workers simultaneously present on-site, significantly reducing site congestion. The structure is comprised of white cement and construction aggregate, which mirrors the glass fiber-reinforced concrete (GFRC) finish on the main office building.

Currently under construction, the 800 S. Flower St parking structure is a four-story parking structure owned and developed by Cusumano Real Estate Group. Once completed, the structure will house up to 525 vehicles, including 20 exterior ground-level spaces on site. The 178.4k sf project features a green screen system with live plants on the structure’s outer walls, bolstering its environment-friendly appeal. Other features that reinforce the property’s aesthetic include streamline stair assemblies, decorative architectural lighting and a plaza area with custom concrete surfaces, which will serve to join the structure architecturally to the adjacent office building.

The third parking structure, completed for CSATF at 2800 Winona Ave, will serve the employees and clients of the non-profit organization, which administers various programs and benefits for motion picture and television industry union workers. Members of the CSATF Boards of Trustees include experts representing companies such as The Walt Disney Company, Warner Bros. Industrial Relations, NBC Universal, CBS Studios Inc., ABC Studios, Sony Pictures Entertainment, Paramount Pictures, the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers, Fox Entertainment Group and Cast & Crew Payroll.

The most recent wave of unionization in film industry auxiliary personnel and a subsequent expansion of institutions redistributing benefits resulted in CSATF needing a new building and parking structure to accommodate the increased scope of the association’s activity. The new 437-stall, five-story, design-build parking structure’s key feature is unusually high 15-foot bays, allowing for the accommodation of specific equipment used in training programs, including aerial lift and scissor lift operations as well as safety drills. The 157.3k sf structure’s unique exterior combines brick veneer and finished concrete surfaces fitting within the architectural composition of the facilities adjacent to the structure.

McCormick’s project management teams for the three projects comprised Don Shipley, vice president and operations manager; Greg Badgett, general superintendent; Greg Bryant, superintendent; Mark Patterson, superintendent; Steve McKee, superintendent; Jeff Deluca, assistant superintendent; Bob Martin, estimator; David Charles, project manager; Isaac Ayala, project manager; Chris Allen, project engineer; and Gilbert Santiago, safety advisor.

-Staff

CBRE Hotels' Thomas Callahan Dies At 61

Bisnow

 

CBRE Hotels' Thomas Callahan died last week after battling cancer, the company announced yesterday. He was 61. “Tom was a guiding force with PKF Consulting USA and an integral part of CBRE Hotels. Moreover, he was a great friend to many in the industry, including all of us at CBRE,” said CBRE Hotels’ Consulting senior managing director Scott Biethan.

After graduating from the University of Washington, Tom started his career with the Pannell Kerr Forster accounting firm. He served as partner in charge of the firm's offices in Dallas, Houston, Boston and Los Angeles. He and other PKF partners split from the tax and accounting firm in 1992 to form Pannell Kerr Forster Consulting, a hotel advisory and valuation firm. Tom was CEO of PKF Consulting USA and partner in charge of the San Francisco office. In 2014, CBRE Group purchased PKF Consulting USA, and Tom became senior managing director and national practice leader for CBRE Hotels, a hospitality advisory division of CBRE Group. Tom also was on the board of directors and chairman of the audit committee for Ashford Hospitality Trust.

JMBM Global Hospitality Group chairman Jim Butler said Tom was a great friend and a giant in the hotel industry on his blog yesterday. Jim quoted an email from Manhattan Hospitality Advisors founder and CEO Jack Westergom, who called Tom one of the most capable, knowledgeable, decent, honest, nice guys in our business. "He was the poster boy for demonstrating that you could be highly effective and a good person at the same time," the email read.

Tom was a Certified Public Accountant, a member of the Counselors of Real Estate, a member of the Appraisal Institute and fellow of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors. His wife, Kathy, recalls Tom taking the ferry in the morning with a cup of coffee and the Wall Street Journal and then walking along the Embarcadero to the San Francisco office.

He enjoyed sailing and summer racing on the Bay and maki
---------------------------

All titles, content, publisher names, trademarks, artwork, and associated imagery are trademarks and/or copyright material of their respective owners. All rights reserved. The Spam Archive website contains material for general information purposes only. It has been written for the purpose of providing information and historical reference containing in the main instances of business or commercial spam.

Many of the messages in Spamdex's archive contain forged headers in one form or another. The fact that an email claims to have come from one email address or another does not mean it actually originated at that address! Please use spamdex responsibly.


Yes YOU! Get INVOLVED - Send in your spam and report offenders

Create a rule in outlook or simply forward the junk email you receive to questions@spamdex.co.uk | See contributors

Google + Spam 2010- 2017 Spamdex - The Spam Archive for the internet. unsolicited electric messages (spam) archived for posterity. Link to us and help promote Spamdex as a means of forcing Spammers to re-think the amount of spam they send us.

The Spam Archive - Chronicling spam emails into readable web records index for all time

Please contact us with any comments or questions at questions@spamdex.co.uk. Spam Archive is a non-profit library of thousands of spam email messages sent to a single email address. A number of far-sighted people have been saving all their spam and have put it online. This is a valuable resource for anyone writing Bayesian filters. The Spam Archive is building a digital library of Internet spam. Your use of the Archive is subject to the Archive's Terms of Use. All emails viewed are copyright of the respected companies or corporations. Thanks to Benedict Sykes for assisting with tech problems and Google Indexing, ta Ben.

Our inspiration is the "Internet Archive" USA. "Libraries exist to preserve society's cultural artefacts and to provide access to them. If libraries are to continue to foster education and scholarship in this era of digital technology, it's essential for them to extend those functions into the digital world." This is our library of unsolicited emails from around the world. See https://archive.org. Spamdex is in no way associated though. Supporters and members of http://spam.abuse.net Helping rid the internet of spam, one email at a time. Working with Inernet Aware to improve user knowlegde on keeping safe online. Many thanks to all our supporters including Vanilla Circus for providing SEO advice and other content syndication help | Link to us | Terms | Privacy | Cookies | Complaints | Copyright | Spam emails / ICO | Spam images | Sitemap | All hosting and cloud migration by Cloudworks.

Important: Users take note, this is Spamdex - The Spam Archive for the internet. Some of the pages indexed could contain offensive language or contain fraudulent offers. If an offer looks too good to be true it probably is! Please tread, carefully, all of the links should be fine. Clicking I agree means you agree to our terms and conditions. We cannot be held responsible etc etc.

The Spam Archive - Chronicling spam emails into readable web records

The Glass House | London | SW19 8AE |
Spamdex is a digital archive of unsolicited electronic mail 4.9 out of 5 based on reviews
Spamdex - The Spam Archive Located in London, SW19 8AE. Phone: 08000 0514541.