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Equity Office Daily Brief: September 22, 2016

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Daily Brief

September 22, 2016

  EquilityOffice

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In Cranes' Shadow, Los Angeles Strains to See a Future With Less Sprawl

New York Times

 

The powerful economic resurgence that has swept Southern California is on display almost everywhere here, visible in the construction cranes towering on the skyline and the gush of applications to build luxury hotels, shopping centers, high-rise condominiums and acres of apartment...

 


NGKF Recruits Another Veteran Broker

Los Angeles Business Journal

 

Newmark Grubb Knight Frank has nabbed another power broker. Brad Feld is leaving Madison Partners to join the brokerage that has lured more than 20 prominent agents to its L.A. offices this year. As vice chairman for Southern California, Feld will aim...

 



BLOG & ONLINE NEWS

 

Nuts and Bolts Changes in Traditional Office Product

GlobeSt.com

 

The use of view glass and the size of floorplates are changing, but just as much drywall is being used in open-office floor plans as in traditional ones, USAA Real Estate Co.’s executive managing director Dirk Mosis tells GlobeSt.com. Mosis is...

 


This Week's LA Deal Sheet

Bisnow

 

Azzi Advisors of Marcus & Millichap just sold a 24-unit apartment property at 324 South St. Andrews Place near Mid-Wilshire. Bisnow caught up with Azzi Advisors president Tony Azzi to get the scoop.Tony (right) and Marcus & Millichap senior associate Rabbie...

 


Bisnow Honors Los Angeles Power Women: Part 9

Bisnow

 

Today we bring you the ninth installment in our 10-part series highlighting some of the top leaders in SoCal commercial real estate. Bisnow's Los Angeles Power Women recognizes 50 influential players in the industry. We're profiling each of these women (read...

 


Another Live-Work Development Coming to the Arts District

Urbanize LA

 

Another Live-Work Development Coming to the Arts District Two years after completing work on a two-building development in Little Tokyo, AvalonBay Communities has turned its sights to the Arts District. Yesterday, the Virginia-based real estate firm filed plans with the City of Los...

 

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In Cranes' Shadow, Los Angeles Strains to See a Future With Less Sprawl

New York Times

 

The powerful economic resurgence that has swept Southern California is on display almost everywhere here, visible in the construction cranes towering on the skyline and the gush of applications to build luxury hotels, shopping centers, high-rise condominiums and acres of apartment complexes from Santa Monica to downtown Los Angeles.

But it can also be seen in a battle that has broken out about the fundamental nature of this distinctively low-lying and spread-out city. The conflict has pitted developers and some government officials against neighborhood organizations and preservationists. It is a debate about height and neighborhood character; the influence of big-money developers on City Hall; and, most of all, what Los Angeles should look like a generation from now.

This is a city that has long defied easy definition — at once urban, suburban and even rural — filled with people who live in homes with year-round gardens and open skies dotted by swaying palm trees, often blocks away from gritty boulevards, highways and clusters of office buildings. And it is no stranger to battles between entrenched neighborhood groups and well-financed developers seeing opportunity in a wealthy market; the slow-growth movement thrived here during the 1990s.

But the debate this time has reached a particularly pitched level, fueled by a severe shortage of affordable housing, an influx of people moving back into the city center and the perception that a Southern California city that once seemed to have unlimited space for growth has run out of track. “What’s that old cliché?” Mayor Eric M. Garcetti said in an interview. “The sprawl has hit the wall in L.A.”

“It’s not whether or not density is going to come,” he said. “It’s whether we plan for it or not. People are like, ‘Oh my God, this is L.A., and they are going tall?’ Height makes you think it’s more dense. And it doesn’t always compute that way. You have to convince people.”

The resistance has been sharp, reflecting a widespread notion that much of the development has been disruptive and haphazard, as well as strong sentimental attachment to a city filled with handsome tree-lined neighborhoods and classic old homes.

“Stop Manhattanwood” billboards have popped up in Hollywood, close to where two 28-story towers were approved by city officials — after a long battle by neighborhood groups — next to the Hollywood Palladium concert hall. In Beverly Hills, which is a separate city from Los Angeles, a proposal by the Beverly Hilton to build what would be that city’s tallest building, a 26-story hotel, has drawn opposition from the mayor in a high-profile battle that will be decided in a ballot measure this fall.

In Los Angeles, neighborhood groups, including opponents of the Palladium project, are collecting signatures for a voter initiative that would impose a two-year moratorium on out-of-scale projects that require special city zoning variations.

“You have huge buildings going on tiny little streets,” said Jill Stewart, who is directing the ballot initiative campaign. “Areas that cannot absorb the development. And communities that haven’t had the discussion about whether they want these buildings.”

The initiative needs 67,000 signatures to be placed on the ballot. It already has 104,000 signatures; among its more prominent supporters is Richard J. Riordan, a Republican and a former mayor of Los Angeles.

“Our city is rapidly being gentrified,” Mr. Riordan said. “The working poor — the lower middle class — are being pushed out of L.A. They are giving building permits to the developers, the ones that give money to the politicians, to build high-rise buildings.”

Mitch O’Farrell, a member of the Los Angeles City Council, called the ballot initiative an overreaction, saying the city needed to encourage growth and development.

“People have real concerns about how projects will affect their neighborhoods, which are legitimate,” he said. “But there are a lot of additional factors in the equation: the opportunities to bring economic growth, to create projects that improve the look of a community, that enhance the safety and security of a community and that also help provide needed tax dollars.”

A number of factors have contributed to the tensions. Los Angeles, like many other big cities dealing with traffic, has been encouraging development along mass-transit lines, such as the one that cuts through Hollywood. The city has also been roiled by a wave of developer tear-downs of picturesque homes in well-established neighborhoods, making way for big houses and stirring sharp opposition in many places.

“Los Angeles was built as a suburban city — it was always put forth as a suburban city,” said Jonathan M. Zasloff, a law professor at U.C.L.A. who teaches land use and opposes the ballot initiative. “You could be in the city and still be in the country at the same time. So when you got a situation where it’s now a city that looks very different, the people who like the old way are trying to stop it from changing.

“Change is scary — urbanization is scary,” he added. “People don’t trust the city. This is a way to stop it. But Los Angeles is not an example of a city where development has run riot. It just isn’t.”

There is a long history here of historically distinctive buildings’ being torn down to make way for new construction, setting off battles with preservationists. Many of the 88 cities in Los Angeles County have historical preservation ordinances, but their effectiveness varies, and much of the construction is proposed for open lots and strip malls.

“The history of Los Angeles is in large part a history of ambivalence about dense development and especially about tall buildings,” Christopher Hawthorne, the architecture critic for The Los Angeles Times, wrote in an email. “We’ve always wanted to rank as a cosmopolitan, world-class city. At the same time, for more than a century we’ve had blue-ribbon committees, ballot measures and civic debates about height limits for new buildings.

“What’s driving the newest wave of construction and its backlash, more than anything, is geography: We’ve run out of open space to build and at the same time hit the limits of sprawl,” he wrote. “Los Angeles is doubling back on itself, building in its midsection as opposed to gobbling up new territory along its periphery. We have finally realized that there are real benefits — in terms of water use, for example — to be gained by living more densely and more vertically.”

Los Angeles has also not rewritten its master plan, which regulates what should be built where, in nearly 30 years. That has led city officials to approve many projects case by case, fueling long-held suspicions that council members are bending to the will of powerful developers.

Richard Platkin, a planner who used to work for the Los Angeles Department of City Planning, said the so-called spot zoning decisions meant that “you have very politically powerful institutions, and occasionally someone with deep pockets, who spends a lot of money to change the zone for one individual parcel.”

“The skyline gets ragged instead of harmonious,” he added. “It’s out of character and out of scale.”

Mr. Zasloff said growth was critical for the future of Los Angeles. “When you have the average renter paying nearly half of his income in rent, that is just unsustainable,” he said. “It’s unsustainable for a city that wants to be a healthy city. You can’t have a healthy city without a healthy middle class. And they have to have a place where you can afford to live.”

-Adam Nagourney

NGKF Recruits Another Veteran Broker

Los Angeles Business Journal

 

Newmark Grubb Knight Frank has nabbed another power broker.

Brad Feld is leaving Madison Partners to join the brokerage that has lured more than 20 prominent agents to its L.A. offices this year. As vice chairman for Southern California, Feld will aim to build Newmark’s landlord and tenant representation practice.

Feld worked at Cushman & Wakefield for more than 15 years before moving to Madison in 2006, a time when clients sought boutique firms for hyper local services.

Today, however, landlords and tenants are looking for the sophisticated research and geographic scale provided by larger companies, according to Feld.

“I felt strongly that I needed a national and international platform,” he said.

Known for his work with entertainment companies, Feld this year brokered leases on behalf of Media Studios North, a Burbank office park owned by Shorenstein Properties and the Worthe Real Estate Group Inc. New tenants include Walt Disney Co., DreamWorks Animation and Hasbro Inc.

Also making the move to Newmark is Steven Salas, who joins Feld in departing Madison and will become an executive managing director.

Newmark’s regional managing director, Greg May, said more hiring was in the works, but could take time. The New York-based company’s ultimate goal is to become the top brokerage among its competitors based on average broker production.

“It’s not about filling a desk. It’s about bringing on great talent and successful people,” May said.

The hiring wave began in January when capital markets broker Kevin Shannon left CBRE with a team of 14 people. Another capital markets broker, David Milestone from Eastdil Secured, joined him in April. Brokers Will Adams and Norman Lee from CBRE signed on in March. Other hires came on board within the past few weeks, including John McMillan and Jeff Sanita from Cushman & Wakefield and Craig Kish from Cresa.

Newmark began its hiring spree after it was acquired by BGC Partners Inc. in 2012, but Shannon’s hiring in January marked a major turning point in helping recruit others.

“He saw the opportunity to grow his platform to different markets that he wasn’t working in,” May said. “If you hire game-changers, everybody wants to play.”

The latest moves were first reported by the Real Deal.

-Real estate reporter Daina Beth Solomon can be reached at dsolomon@labusinessjournal.com. Follow @dainabethcita on Twitter for the latest in L.A. real estate news.

Nuts and Bolts Changes in Traditional Office Product

GlobeSt.com

 

The use of view glass and the size of floorplates are changing, but just as much drywall is being used in open-office floor plans as in traditional ones, USAA Real Estate Co.’s executive managing director Dirk Mosis tells GlobeSt.com. Mosis is planning committee chair for NAIOP’s O.CON conference here November 1-2. We spoke with him exclusively about the conference, what attendees will get out of it that they won’t find elsewhere and how traditional office product is evolving.

GlobeSt.com: What will attendees get out of this conference that they won’t find elsewhere?

Mosis: Experience and professionalism within the office-development arena are at a very high level—both the people who are presenting as well as those in the audience. If you want to meet people across North America who are doing remarkable office leasing and development, this is the place to go. Our focus will be on technology in the workplace and will cover some topics I haven’t seen at previous NAIOP conferences. There will be discussion about the garages of the future and the human resources element in attracting and retaining employees; where does office space play in the HR decision-making world? Looking at some buildings that 10 years ago made a lot of sense and seeing how they have been changed to attract/retain more of a technology-focused group of young talent is pretty exciting. It’s a great way to see the latest going on in designing and developing—these are case studies happening in real time, which I particularly like.

GlobeSt.com: How do you see traditional office product evolving in terms of changes in technology, demand and demographics?

Mosis: Certain materials are changing in the envelope of the building. For example, view glass is old technology, but it’s just now getting into a reasonable price point with building. It cuts down on heat gain and cuts the cost of electricity; A/C units don’t have to work as hard, and people control individual units from their office. A lot of the technology of the building itself is pretty straightforward: is it steel, brick, concrete and glass. Floorplates getting bigger—they’ve gone from 20,000 square feet to 30,000 square feet in most buildings now. There are more people on a floor, and sometimes the codes aren’t quite up to speed, stairways need to be larger or one more stall is needed in each restroom.

There are more social and gathering areas, and this could be in the main lobby—you see more of that since people are on their mobile devices—so that conversations and work are actually being done in the lobby or the gym and not necessarily in a conference room or in someone’s office. Millennials move around more.

I’d like to say we’re spending less on drywall, but we’re really not, according to studies. Space may appear to be a little more open, but when you’re putting in more quiet rooms and conference rooms, you’re putting in the same amount of drywall and glass as before. Our parent company, USAA, serves everyone from call centers to real technology-development guys, and they are all about, “Where can I attract and retain people inside the building, but also outside? Where are the amenities?” There are requests from call centers for seven or eight per 1,000 parking—huge parking lots. They’re trying to get those closer to restaurants or offer cafeterias to provide good food quicker, fresher, to so people stay on site and produce more. It’s more focused on the individual, the employee.

GlobeSt.com: What else should our readers know about O.CON?

Mosis: O.CON is a great place to network with experienced people and connect with new names in the game – there are a lot of new people to the industry. It’s a great place to gain better understanding of the innovations touching our industry now and in the future and how we can adapt. Our L.A. chapter has set up some project tours in the local market that are pretty cool—tours of rehab, mixed-use, new construction—it’s a real draw for people to come out there.

-Staff

This Week's LA Deal Sheet

Bisnow

 

Azzi Advisors of Marcus & Millichap just sold a 24-unit apartment property at 324 South St. Andrews Place near Mid-Wilshire. Bisnow caught up with Azzi Advisors president Tony Azzi to get the scoop.Tony (right) and Marcus & Millichap senior associate Rabbie Banafsheha (left) had the exclusive listing to sell the property.Tony tells Bisnow investment opportunities in Mid-Wilshire, especially in a good location, are not easy to find."A deal like this doesn't become available very often," Tony says. The building is a non-rent-control building with upside potential for rent increases.The seller was ready to sell because he had acquired a larger asset, according to Tony.The buyer was interested in the property because he liked the location and that it was a non-rent-control building.The property (above) is more than 50 years old and is on a 9,016 SF lot.Tony and Rabbie repped the seller, a limited liability company, and the buyer, another limited liability company.SALESA private investor bought a multifamily portfolio, totaling 41 units in Studio City and Toluca Lake for nearly $9.5M.Blix Apartments, at 4731 Vineland Ave in Toluca Lake, sold for $4.095M.It is a 19-unit property with one-bedroom, two-bedroom and three-bedroom units.The other property, Vineland Villa Apartments, a 22-unit property at 3935 Vineland Ave in Studio City, sold for $5.4M, more than $100k above the list price.It has studio, one-bedroom and two-bedroom units.Berzack Investment Property Advisors president Warren Berzack repped the buyer and seller. Berzack Investment Property Advisors is a multifamily specialty group of Lee & Associates-LA North/Ventura. RE/MAX Commercial & Investment Realty sold a property at 1840 North Kenmore Ave in Los Feliz.The 72?unit, 71,232 SF building is not subject to rent control and was built nearly 30 years ago.RE/MAX Commercial & Investment Realty VP Jonathan Taksa repped the buyer, Kenmore GF LLC.Beverly Hills Realty Group partner Chuck Henderson repped the seller, Kenmore View Apartments LLC.Voit Real Estate Services sold Arrow Business Park, a seven-building, 136,806 SF multi-tenant industrial/flex business park in Rancho Cucamonga for $15.4M.It consists of 69 units ranging from 240 SF to 12,650 SF.Arrow Business Park, built 28 years ago, is at 9047-9087 Arrow Route.It was 76% occupied at acquisition.Focus Real Estate acquired the property in partnership with HG Capital.Bridgeport Investments' Chris Bramel and Randy Bramel arranged the debt and assisted with the equity for the acquisition.An acquisition loan was provided by Silvergate Bank of La Jolla.Voit's Frank Geraci and Juan Gutierrez of the Inland Empire office, and Mike Bouma of the Orange County office, worked together to rep both the buyer, Focus Real Estate, and the seller, Essex Arrow LLC.Madison Partners just sold the Tower at Sherman Oaks, a 167,726 SF Class-A office property with street-level retail at 14724 Ventura Blvd in Sherman Oaks.The price was $56.7M or $338/SF. The building is 96% occupied.Madison Partners also arranged acquisition and renovation financing totaling $48.1M with Loancore Capital on behalf of Sandstone Properties.Madison Partners president and founder Bob Safai, senior executive director Matt Case and Brad Schlaak repped the seller, Douglas Emmett.LEASINGAvison Young negotiated a 63-month, 13k SF office lease in Hollywood for Soothe, an on-demand massage service.Soothe plans to move from its current 4k SF office in West Hollywood to the recently revamped sixth floor of 1800 Highland Ave before the end of the year.Avison Young principal Scott Steuber and VP Jeff Vertun repped the tenant.NGKF repped the landlord, Souferian Group.Ardmore Home Design signed a long-term lease for a 128,810 SF state-of-the-art Class-A industrial facility in the City of Industry.The space will serve as the corporate headquarters for Ardmore’s popular home décor business lines Made Goods and Pigeon & Poodle.Ardmore will be consolidating and relocating operations from three separate warehousing facilities in Baldwin Park to its new facility at 768 Turnbull Canyon Road.Cushman & Wakefield director Ty Newland with the Inland Empire office repped the tenant.FINANCINGiBorrow has provided an $18.05M acquisition loan for the purchase of an approximately 133k SF office building on Olympic Boulevard in Koreatown.As part of its acquisition loan, iBorrow will fund part of the cost for the borrower to change the use of the property from an office to a hotel.The building gained notoriety last year when a fire on the fifth floor forced all of the building’s tenants to vacate.The property had been vacant since then.-Karen Jordan

Bisnow Honors Los Angeles Power Women: Part 9

Bisnow

 

Today we bring you the ninth installment in our 10-part series highlighting some of the top leaders in SoCal commercial real estate. Bisnow's Los Angeles Power Women recognizes 50 influential players in the industry. We're profiling each of these women (read Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5, Part 6, Part 7 and Part 8) and then honoring them the morning of Oct. 11 at a special awards reception.

Dani Evanson, Co-Owner/Managing Director, RMARMA co-owner and managing director Dani Evanson (pictured with her husband, Ken McLaughlin) heard about real estate at her parent’s kitchen table. That stuck with Dani and helped lead to her future in the industry. She most enjoys getting to watch "our team grow, expand our network of investors and continue to build the business into a successful private equity firm.” The biggest challenges facing commercial real estate these days are peaking real estate values and the abundance of capital seeking yield, according to Dani. For women interested in the business, she says “do what you love, and do it well.” Outside of the office, Dani enjoys skiing, traveling and spending time with her family.

Jaime Lee, CEO, Jamison RealtyJamison Realty CEO Jaime Lee was born into the industry. Her father named the company after her when he founded it—Jameson was her nickname as a child. She began working for the company while in high school, and she moved up through property management, starting as manager of the California Market Center in DTLA. In her current role as CEO of the company's brokerage and leasing arm, she oversees leasing for an 18M SF office and retail portfolio. As a Millennial, she says she understands the way her generation thinks about work environments and how that is changing the way landlords provide office space. Jaime says being in real estate makes her feel “tied to the land,” and she has found it incredibly rewarding that her business life in LA has allowed her to become deeply involved in civic and nonprofit organizations. For women entering the industry, she suggests taking risks and being well prepared. Her time outside of the office is busy with her 7-month-old daughter, but she also loves her LA sports teams.

Leslie Lundin, Managing Partner, LBG Real Estate Cos

Leslie Lundin spent her summers remodeling homes as a teenager and went on to earn her CRE degree from UW Madison, which she says offered the best program in the country at the time. Leslie loves the challenge the industry presents; no two deals are alike. “There’s no rulebook in CRE since the only constant is change,” she tells us. “If you don’t adapt, you get run over in this business, and I love coming up with new and creative ways to structure and execute on deals.” This constant change, however, is a blessing and a curse. Leslie says the challenges transcend business cycles in the retail industry. Predicting the future of brick-and-mortar is a daily challenge, and Leslie jokes that her team members often feel like they are playing a game of metaphorical musical chairs. She’s still renovating, though now it’s her own home. Leslie spends most of her time outside of work raising her three sons and helping to run the San Francisco Audiophile Society.

Nicole Mihalka, EVP, JLLJLL EVP Nicole Mihalka got into the industry through Profit Techniques, a sales training and headhunting company owned by CRE veteran Dave Hibbard. She was placed at DAUM Commercial Real Estate and began her career as a “runner,” she says. These days, she thrives on closing deals—one career highlight was getting a chance to tour Oprah Winfrey around the Lot in West Hollywood, which led to the Oprah Winfrey Network’s lease at Formosa South. Nicole says commercial real estate is still “very much a male-dominated business,” though she sees that slowly changing. She also says the little money that is made during the first couple of years as a broker shouldn’t be a deterrent. Outside of the office, Nicole likes to hike, spend time with her 2-year-old, Pierce, and eat out with her husband, Martin Fenlon (pictured), in their northeast LA neighborhood.

Pam Light, SVP, HOKHOK SVP Pam Light says she naturally gravitated to interior design early on, even rearranging her bedroom and her friends’ rooms at the tender age of 4. She finds her job rewarding every day, recalling a particular project where HOK designed a new headquarters for a startup entertainment company. This project included resolving “complicated issues,” including removing a column in the middle of five floors for a TV studio. After the employees moved in, the head of HR told her how she liked to “come in early and walk through the space because it lifts my whole day.” Pam loves when the work she does makes it “really magical for the people who live in the space.” A challenge to the industry is how HGTV-type shows with their super-quick schedules don’t take into account a thoughtful understanding of what people need and timely review of those needs versus the budget, she says. She suggests women going into the industry never stop learning: “Understanding and empathizing with our clients helps us make their environment really meaningful." Outside of her career, Pam loves to shop, visit museums, walk her dogs and travel.

-Staff

Another Live-Work Development Coming to the Arts District

Urbanize LA

 

Another Live-Work Development Coming to the Arts District

Two years after completing work on a two-building development in Little Tokyo, AvalonBay Communities has turned its sights to the Arts District.

Yesterday, the Virginia-based real estate firm filed plans with the City of Los Angeles for a mixed-use complex at the southwest corner of Alameda Street and Industrial Avenue.  The proposed development, slated for the site of a 130,000-square-foot cold storage facility, would offer 475 live-work lofts, 45,000 square feet of ground-floor retail space and parking for 703 vehicles.  AvalonBay would set aside 5% of the total residential units as affordable housing.

AVA Arts District, the limited liablity company listed in the project's case filing, suggests that the property is being developed as part of AvalonBay's AVA brand, which caters to younger renters seeking traditional urban neighborhoods.

The applicant has requested several discretionary approvals for the development, including a general plan amendment and a zone change.

AvalonBay is the latest developer to take advantage of the City's hybrid-industrial live/work ordinance, which facilitates residential development in the Arts District and other manufacturing districts flanking Downtown.  Other proposals making use of the ordinance include the 2110 Bay development and projects from Bolour Associates and Carmel Partners.

The property sits immediately south of SunCal's 14.5-acre 6th & Alameda development site and a similar project planned by Camden Property Trust.  Across Alameda Street, ROW DTLA office and retail campus is repurposing the former Alameda Square campus.

-Steven Sharp

Daily Brief September 22, 2016 unsubscribe

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