Spamdex - Spam Archive

Report spam

Send in your spam and get the offenders listed

Create a rule in outlook or simply forward the spam you receive to questions@spamdex.co.uk

Also in myequityoffice.com

Equity Office Daily Brief: October 13, 2016

Can't see content of this e-mail? Click HERE for browser version.
Daily Brief

October 13, 2016

  EquilityOffice

PRINT NEWS

 

8 Real Estate Startups to Watch

Forbes

 

Entrepreneurs have long been using technology to remove barriers and make time-intensive processes more efficient across many industries, yet real estate innovation has seemed to lag behind. The tried-and-true process of purchasing property has had a rigid flow. Still, there are...

 



BLOG & ONLINE NEWS

 

Efficiency: The New Buzz Word For California Businesses

CoStar.com

 

Efficiency is becoming the new buzzword for California businesses. The state is en route to raise minimum wage to $15 per hour by the year 2022, with $1 per hour incremental increases each year, which will result in rising operating expenses...

 


Warner Music Group Signs 257,000-SF Office Lease at Ford Factory

CoStar.com

 

Warner Music Group Corp. signed a nearly 13-year lease for the entire Ford Factory office building, a 257,028-square-foot property currently under redevelopment at 777 S. Santa Fe Ave. in Los Angeles, CA. Originally home to a Model T car manufacturing factory, the...

 


Crowdsourcing Firms Starting to Rack Up Noticeable Volume in CRE Financing

CoStar.com

 

Marketplace lenders (also known as crowdsourcing or peer-to-peer lenders) comprise a small but growing sliver of the multi-trillion dollar U.S. commercial real estate (CRE) finance industry. But while the sector has a tiny share of the mainstream market, these nonbank lenders...

 


New buildings would surround The Fonda in Hollywood

Curbed LA

 

Yet another developer wants to build a hotel in Hollywood, and this one would be right next to the 1920s music venue The Fonda Theatre on Hollywood Boulevard, not far from the 101 Freeway. Plans filed with the city’s planning department Tuesday call for a 14-story building...

 


The new American suburb: diverse, dense, and booming

Curbed

 

American suburbs are far from a static set of cookie-cutter housing developments, the rows of infamous “ticky-tacky little boxes” popularized as soon as the postwar housing boom started. But a forthcoming new report, Demographic Strategies for Real Estate, suggests that this...

 

FULL TEXT


8 Real Estate Startups to Watch

Forbes

 

Entrepreneurs have long been using technology to remove barriers and make time-intensive processes more efficient across many industries, yet real estate innovation has seemed to lag behind. The tried-and-true process of purchasing property has had a rigid flow. Still, there are a handful of startups nibbling around the edges, hoping to get a piece of the massive real estate market.

The latest real estate tech startups infuse the industry with much needed innovation, allowing for more creative solutions when it comes to data sharing, project management and even funding. From property listing and lease management to crowdfunding and even virtual viewing, here are some of the startups having the biggest impact on the real estate market today.

1. AgentDesks

This innovative app combines a powerful CRM for agents with a networking space, making it easier than ever to interact with other agents and to manage contacts and relationships. AgentDesks serves as a mobile workstation for commercial and residential real estate agents, simplifying how they manage information, projects and prospects.

2. LiquidSpace

Targeting new businesses and startups in need of office space, LiquidSpace makes it possible to set up shop in just a few hours, instead of a few weeks. This startup matches those with space to let with those looking for new office digs – and helps out with all of the lease and payment details, too.

3. VTS

This New York based startup has already raised$84 million, making it the most well funded company in commercial real estate technology,and continues to gain ground. The technology is an asset management and leasing platform that provides real-time analytics to landlords and brokerage firms. With VTS, brokers and landlords can manage deal activity, identify trends and quantify portfolio performance from their desktop or mobile device. To date, more than 3 billion square feet of real estate are managed on VTS.

4. HighTower

Founded in 2015, this innovative management platform takes advantage of the cloud to bring together all parties in the commercial leasing process. Hightower enables multiple parties to view data and make collaborative decisions in real-time.

5. CompStak

This crowdsourcing model focuses on creating an ever-growing database of difficult to find, difficult to compile real estate information. By incentivizing data submissions, CompStak has built a comprehensive and far-reaching database of commercial real estate comps. The resulting database also has a variety of resale options – CompStak has successfully targeted banks, hedge funds, REITs and other asset managers and agencies.

6. Rentylitics

This San Francisco startup focuses on the multi-family real estate market and allows investors to assess investment data and business intelligence in one easy-to-use dashboard. The Rentylitics interface includes both analytics and a variety of tools to maximize revenues and get a true idea of the potential performance for their assets.

7. RealtyShares

Bridging the gap between real estate borrowers and investors, this crowdfunding company allows fix-and-flippers, developers and operators to seek funding for projects around the country through the RealtyShares platform. The company’s network of more than 25,000 investors can get involved in these deals for as little as $5,000.

8. DocuSign

It’s not particularly new or fancy, but the ability to sign legal documents in digital format has had a huge impact on the commercial and residential real estate world. Founded in 2003, Docusign makes it easy to close deals online whether the other party is in the room next door or thousands of miles away.

These startups are streamlining the way real estate professionals, investors and organizations share data, manage projects and even fund investments. While all might not survive, the potential to contribute to a thriving industry has been enough to fuel some exciting, innovative new products.

-Nav Athwal

Efficiency: The New Buzz Word For California Businesses

CoStar.com

 

Efficiency is becoming the new buzzword for California businesses. The state is en route to raise minimum wage to $15 per hour by the year 2022, with $1 per hour incremental increases each year, which will result in rising operating expenses for all California businesses. As a result, business owners and operators are finding ways to increase productivity and operations without necessarily cutting jobs.

“Whenever there is a modification to any business—in this sense an increase in operations cost, business owners and operators will immediately look at ways to offset those costs, and the first word is efficiency,” Chris Beck, managing director at NGKF, tells GlobeSt.com.

This isn’t the first universal increase in operating expenses for businesses. The Affordable Care Act also increased operating expenses, but businesses were able to adjust their other expenses to accommodate the change. Beck imagines that the ACA will serve as a sort of template for the minimum wage hike. “This isn’t the only recent expense that businesses have seen,” he says. “A lot of businesses have already gone through this with the Affordable Care Act, which was a major increase in operational expenses for most operators, and they were able to increase their efficiencies. This is a similar increase in operational expenses that all businesses have to endure, no matter what form of commercial real estate that you occupy.”

Beck stresses that increasing operating efficiencies by lowering costs doesn’t necessarily mean cutting jobs. He says that businesses may look at things like utilities or power sources to cut back. “This may force some industries to be more environmentally friendly to cut costs,” he explains. “It could be a minor tweak to increase your bottom line.”

The impact of the wage increase likely will be more of an adjustment than a catastrophe, and it may actually have a positive impact on commercial real estate brokers who will be available to guide and consult clients through the adjustment process. “When operational costs go up, businesses have to look at ways to increase efficiencies. Because you are seeing a slow implementation of this, it is giving businesses times to adjust,” says Beck. “The focus here is really on efficiencies for businesses across sector lines. Because of the gradual implantation, businesses are allowed to appropriately forecast, plan and create more efficiencies within the operation to offset an increase in operational expenses. That is a critical point.”

-Kelsi Maree Borland

Warner Music Group Signs 257,000-SF Office Lease at Ford Factory

CoStar.com

 

Warner Music Group Corp. signed a nearly 13-year lease for the entire Ford Factory office building, a 257,028-square-foot property currently under redevelopment at 777 S. Santa Fe Ave. in Los Angeles, CA. Originally home to a Model T car manufacturing factory, the building was constructed in 1912 in what is now the Greater Downtown submarket in Los Angeles' Arts District. Shorenstein Properties LLC is converting the building into a five-story, class A office property, with a certificate of occupancy expected by year-end. Matthew Miller of Cresa in Los Angeles represented the tenant in lease negotiations. John Zanetos, Chris Penrose, Todd Doney, Phillip Ruhl and Robert Waller of CBRE in Los Angeles represented the landlord.

-Kate Retzinger

Crowdsourcing Firms Starting to Rack Up Noticeable Volume in CRE Financing

CoStar.com

 

Marketplace lenders (also known as crowdsourcing or peer-to-peer lenders) comprise a small but growing sliver of the multi-trillion dollar U.S. commercial real estate (CRE) finance industry. But while the sector has a tiny share of the mainstream market, these nonbank lenders that rely on online marketing and underwriting platforms to raise investment funds are beginning to do enough business to attract increased scrutiny from bank regulators and rating agencies. Marketplace lending platforms reported rapid growth in 2015, with an estimated $28.6 billion in loans originated, according to the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. While most of that growth was for consumer lending, some of the funds raised went into CRE lending. "Marketplace lending in the commercial real estate sector promises efficiency and speed of execution in terms of mortgage loan originations, as well as access to previously untapped sources of capital," said Moody's director of commercial real estate research, Tad Philipp. "It will, however, grow more slowly than in consumer finance sectors because CRE loans are typically larger, more document-intensive and backed by collateral that is not homogenous.” Marketplace lenders received a boost from a 2013 federal law that allowed businesses to publicly solicit investments from accredited investors. Currently, such lenders address the full spectrum of debt investments, though the bulk of CRE debt is still originated by portfolio lenders, Moody's Philipp noted in a report issued last week. In time, though, Philipp believes marketplace lenders could drive banks and other portfolio lenders to shift more of their origination process online to possibly improve standardization, efficiency and speed of execution, especially for smaller loans. At the very least, Moody's expects marketplace lenders to prompt other lenders to raise their game in terms of sourcing and processing loan originations. The sweet spot for marketplace lenders offering CRE funding is currently loans of less than $5 million, which to some extent overlaps with CMBS loan originations, as well as originations from portfolio lenders. The CEO of Money360, a Ladera Ranch, CA-based CRE marketplace lending platform, said the drop-off in CMBS financing earlier this year provided an opening for this new sector and enabled some marketplace lenders to rack up some impressive numbers. Money360 recently surpassed the $100 million mark in closed loans with the completion of $15.25 million in loans closed late this summer. "The continued growth of our lending platform is a testament to the marketplace's need for non-bank and alternative lenders to fill the void left by banks and the contracting and shifting CMBS market," according to Money360 founder and CEO Evan Gentry, adding that Money360 has seen more than a 100% increase in applications from borrowers turned down by bank and CMBS institutions as a result of increased regulations. Money360's recent transactions include a pair of bridge loans for the acquisition of a multifamily property in Tucson and the renovation of a full-service boutique hotel in Aurora, OH; cash-out permanent financing for a single-tenant retail building in Dayton, OH; and a bridge loan for the refinance of a 206,257-square-foot shopping center in Jacksonville, IL. Los Angeles-based Realty Mogul Co., another marketplace lender active in the CRE sector, claims to have originated, underwritten and financed over $200 million in real estate properties across approximately 200 debt and equity transactions since its founding in 2013. This past summer, Realty Mogul launched a nontraded REIT, MogulREIT I, looking to raise $50 million for investment in CRE debt. “We believe that the near- and intermediate-term market for investment in commercial real estate loans, commercial real estate-related debt securities, commercial real estate-related equity securities, and other real estate-related assets is compelling from a risk-return perspective. Given the prospect of low growth for the economy, we favor a strategy that targets senior and mezzanine debt to maximize current income, with significant subordinate capital and downside structural protections,” the REIT said in an SEC filing. Despite such successes, the growth and evolution of CRE marketplace lending bears watching, Philipp of Moody's said, especially as CRE enters the late stages of the credit cycle when construction is more feasible. CRE marketplace lenders have a short loan performance track record, with most of it during an economic recovery. An element of negative selection could also be in play, with marketplace lenders in some cases making loans that balance-sheet lenders would not, Phillip said. The Comptroller of the Currency this summer also issued warnings to banks about jumping into the marketplace lending sector. Some marketplace lenders have experienced challenges in managing costs, credit performance, and loan delivery as institutional investor interest has diminished, the OCC noted. As more banks engage in strategic partnerships, purchase loans, securitize or work in other ways with marketplace lending firms, banks could face potential compliance, operational, and market risk issues, the OCC said.

-Mark Heschmeyer

New buildings would surround The Fonda in Hollywood

Curbed LA

 

Yet another developer wants to build a hotel in Hollywood, and this one would be right next to the 1920s music venue The Fonda Theatre on Hollywood Boulevard, not far from the 101 Freeway.

Plans filed with the city’s planning department Tuesday call for a 14-story building with 102 hotel rooms, plus 27 condos, and 11,460 square feet for restaurants at 6140 West Hollywood Boulevard. That address, on the corner of El Centro, is home to a one-story orange building most recently leased by a copying and printing business.

The developer needs city approval to build the project, which would be bigger and taller than what LA's zoning code allows. The developer, Chinese-based Hollywood Culture and Investment Corp Inc., scooped up the property in June for $9.5 million, or about $565 a square foot, which was a record in Hollywood, according to the Los Angeles Business Journal.

"Hollywood is a highly desirable market for foreign investors and its brand name holds more weight abroad than at home," John Tronson, a broker representing Hollywood Culture and Investment, told the business journal. 

On the other side of the Fonda is a parking lot where a different developer wants to build a 23-story building with 220 residential units above 4,850 square feet of retail space and a restaurant.

-Jenna Chandler

The new American suburb: diverse, dense, and booming

Curbed

 

American suburbs are far from a static set of cookie-cutter housing developments, the rows of infamous “ticky-tacky little boxes” popularized as soon as the postwar housing boom started. But a forthcoming new report, Demographic Strategies for Real Estate, suggests that this archetypical part of the American landscape, which has constantly been evolving, is in for some massive changes over the next decade that will reshape planning, land-use, and the real estate market.

Compiled by John Burns Real Estate Consulting for the Urban Land Institute (ULI), the report lays out a vision of suburbia at odds with the Betty Draper stereotype of the ‘50s. Powered by social and demographic shifts involving young workers, immigrants, working women, and retirees, suburbs will get denser, more diverse, and more urban.

While the urban renaissance that has reshaped U.S. cities isn’t stopping, a massive move by millennials in family mode to more affordable suburban markets will create a upswing in household formation. Suburbs will need to get denser, in part because demographic shifts forecast for the next 10-15 years will bring many new arrivals. Millennials will begin to form households in masse, millions of Baby Boomers will retire and seek out multi-generational neighborhoods, and immigration will continue to grow and evolve.

Here are some of the key takeaways from the report.

Suburbs will look more and more like cities

“The world has shifted much from owning a big house towards valuing time,” says John Burns, CEO of the firm that authored the report. “People want to be close to work and exciting things to do. The notion of long commutes, never popular, is falling out of favor.”

While urban areas are becoming more and more expensive, the urban lifestyle is becoming more and more popular, so suburban towns and developers are increasingly catering those looking for a more walkable, dense community. A new supply of smaller homes with little or no yards in high-population areas will meet the demand to commute less and live closer to restaurants and entertainment. The report calls this “Surban” development; suburban development that brings the best of city living to more affordable areas.

There’s a wide continuum of suburban development, says Stockton Williams, Executive Director of the ULI’s Terwilliger Center for Housing, and many vibrant examples of denser design, aligning with these predictions, are popping up. 

“Plano, Texas, is an example of a suburban area that’s developing a town center while maintaining suburban residential patterns and affordability,” says Williams. “That’s one of the reasons why the city just convinced Toyota to move its North American headquarters to Plano.”

Robert Bowman, President of the Residential Neighborhood Development Council and a ULI member, believes in a model for walkable urbanism he’s calling “The Great American Neighborhood.” These aren’t new ideas, he says, but seeing contemporary suburban developers executing on them in an industry filled with typical developments suggests their seen as a great opportunity. Laying down the old formula won’t work anymore.

“We’ve seen a substantial shift in people who want the ability to walk to amenities in the suburbs,” says Bowman. “Cities have become the hotspots because people can engage in the areas where they live. Places that have a timeless appeal to them from an architectural and planning standpoint are in high demand.”

In another example of more urbanized living, more suburbanites will rent instead of owning homes. The report forecast that 58 percent of new arrivals will be rentals, and a larger percentage of Americans than ever before will opt to raise their family in a professionally managed, detached rental home than ever before.

This type of growth will take place across the nation, but the report forecasts the Sun Belt boom continuing to ramp up, especially in the Southeast, where 24 percent of the country’s household growth from 2015-2025 is predicted to occur. That’s even more impressive when you realize Florida is considered its own region in the report.

“The Southeast is filled with pro-growth areas that are attracting great jobs, such as Charlotte, Atlanta, and Raleigh, regions where you can live in a good school district and get a house for $250,000,” says Burns.

Commercial and retail development will downsize, becoming more personal and flexible

The days of office campuses and big box stores are waning. Bowman forecast a jump in office space in the suburbs, especially flexible options geared around service-based industries and built near walkable commercial districts. He calls them crossroads businesses; think small business America with tree-lined streets, districts that capture the texture and energy of urban environments.

Again, these aren’t new ideas, and many such areas already exist in the suburbs. But they’re increasingly being revitalized, or make up the core of forthcoming suburban developments. Newer retail complexes are already more entertainment oriented, geared towards attracting crowds and civic life as opposed to solely focusing on landing big-name retail tenants.

“Old retail malls are becoming eyesores,” says Burns. “It’s a perfect win-win to pull down retail center and put in high-density housing and retail.”

Following the social shift towards valuing time and flexibility, suburban office spaces will become smaller and more flexible, according to the report, with a jump in rental spaces akin to the growth in urban coworking.

One of the drivers of this workplace evolution is the continued rise of the working woman, who will earn 58 percent of this generation’s college degrees, play a bigger role in company leadership (and therefore office site selection), and already feels comfortable with the sharing economy.

“She’s becoming the breadwinner, she’s far more likely to be college educated, and she’s driving bigger household decisions more than ever before,” says Burns.

Huge demographics shifts, especially immigration, will reshape the suburbs

The next decade will see a rise in immigration, as well as a change in the makeup of these new Americans, who will have higher incomes and education and settle in the suburbs. More will arrive via airplanes with higher incomes and educational attainment, as opposed to the perception of immigrants crossing the border in search of low-paying manual labor jobs.

At the current pace, 52 million Americans, or one in seven residents, will be foreign-born by 2025, according to the report. That has huge implications on household growth and business formation, and suggests the suburbs will be a much more multicultural place.

Millennial families and empty nesters will reshape the housing market

The pent-up demand for households for young adults will radically reshape land-use policy, according to Williams. The report predicts that a staggering 86 percent more households will form between 2015 and 2025 than the previous decade. That translates into 13.7 million new homes and apartments being built to meet the demand.

But perhaps just as influential will be the huge impact of retiring baby boomers. The 65-plus population will grow 38 percent from 2015 to 2025, adding 18 million “seniors” (a term most in this age group believe applies doesn’t apply to them, a sign of shifting social attitudes about age).

“We saw the population of millennials grow by 5 million over the last decade,” says Burns. “But we also saw the 55-to-64 population grow by 10 million. And who has more money? In many urban areas, a lot of the growth has been fueled in part by Boomers moving in and renting.”

With the suburbs surging and cities growing, rural areas will shrink

Many of the factors covered in the report suggest rural areas are primed for growth. They’re traditionally popular with retirees—the country is in the midst of a retirement boom—and with the rise in remote working and online shopping, it’s easier than ever to live and work anywhere.

But Burns’ research concludes that rural isn’t coming back; their forecast is pretty bearish on growth outside of urban and suburban areas.

“Step back, and you’d think rural would be gaining share,” says Burns. “But that’s just not the case. Rural areas got hit hard by the downturn, haven’t reinvested, and haven’t bounced back.”

-Patrick Sisson

Daily Brief October 13, 2016 unsubscribe

---------------------------

All titles, content, publisher names, trademarks, artwork, and associated imagery are trademarks and/or copyright material of their respective owners. All rights reserved. The Spam Archive website contains material for general information purposes only. It has been written for the purpose of providing information and historical reference containing in the main instances of business or commercial spam.

Many of the messages in Spamdex's archive contain forged headers in one form or another. The fact that an email claims to have come from one email address or another does not mean it actually originated at that address! Please use spamdex responsibly.


Yes YOU! Get INVOLVED - Send in your spam and report offenders

Create a rule in outlook or simply forward the junk email you receive to questions@spamdex.co.uk | See contributors

Google + Spam 2010- 2017 Spamdex - The Spam Archive for the internet. unsolicited electric messages (spam) archived for posterity. Link to us and help promote Spamdex as a means of forcing Spammers to re-think the amount of spam they send us.

The Spam Archive - Chronicling spam emails into readable web records index for all time

Please contact us with any comments or questions at questions@spamdex.co.uk. Spam Archive is a non-profit library of thousands of spam email messages sent to a single email address. A number of far-sighted people have been saving all their spam and have put it online. This is a valuable resource for anyone writing Bayesian filters. The Spam Archive is building a digital library of Internet spam. Your use of the Archive is subject to the Archive's Terms of Use. All emails viewed are copyright of the respected companies or corporations. Thanks to Benedict Sykes for assisting with tech problems and Google Indexing, ta Ben.

Our inspiration is the "Internet Archive" USA. "Libraries exist to preserve society's cultural artefacts and to provide access to them. If libraries are to continue to foster education and scholarship in this era of digital technology, it's essential for them to extend those functions into the digital world." This is our library of unsolicited emails from around the world. See https://archive.org. Spamdex is in no way associated though. Supporters and members of http://spam.abuse.net Helping rid the internet of spam, one email at a time. Working with Inernet Aware to improve user knowlegde on keeping safe online. Many thanks to all our supporters including Vanilla Circus for providing SEO advice and other content syndication help | Link to us | Terms | Privacy | Cookies | Complaints | Copyright | Spam emails / ICO | Spam images | Sitemap | All hosting and cloud migration by Cloudworks.

Important: Users take note, this is Spamdex - The Spam Archive for the internet. Some of the pages indexed could contain offensive language or contain fraudulent offers. If an offer looks too good to be true it probably is! Please tread, carefully, all of the links should be fine. Clicking I agree means you agree to our terms and conditions. We cannot be held responsible etc etc.

The Spam Archive - Chronicling spam emails into readable web records

The Glass House | London | SW19 8AE |
Spamdex is a digital archive of unsolicited electronic mail 4.9 out of 5 based on reviews
Spamdex - The Spam Archive Located in London, SW19 8AE. Phone: 08000 0514541.