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Equity Office Daily Brief: October 5, 2017

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Daily Brief

October 05, 2017

  EquilityOffice

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Owner of downtown property is taking bids to create a massive mixed-use development

Los Angeles Times

 

The owner of a two-block stretch just south of downtown Los Angeles is soliciting bids to develop the area into a massive $1.2-billion mixed-use project that would include a hotel, shops and residences. The site south of the 10 Freeway is now...

 


Large-scale apartment development is underway in Marina Arts District

Los Angeles Times

 

A Los Angeles real estate developer is building 230 apartments in the city’s burgeoning Marina Arts District, a former industrial zone by Marina del Rey. California Landmark Group, which has built other residential complexes in the neighborhood, has started construction on an...

 



BLOG & ONLINE NEWS

 

Westfield Unveils $1 Billion Redesign of Century City Mall

CoStar

 

It is a grand opening two years in the making. Westfield Corp. unveiled its $1 billion Westfield Century City redevelopment project this week.  The Australia-based mall developer and owner added about 422,000 square feet to the 53-year-old shopping mall, including a new...

 


Take a look at the huge mixed use complex planned next to MacArthur Park

CurbedLA

 

Plans for a major new Westlake development that would tower over MacArthur Park are moving forward, with the Los Angeles City Planning Commission scheduled to weigh in on the project next week. A report from planning staff (spotted by Urbanize LA) provides new details and an early glimpse of what...

 


Long Beach's Tallest Building to Start Construction in 2018

urbanize.LA

 

Shoreline Gateway, the future tallest building in Long Beach, will break ground in early 2018 according to an announcement from co-developers Ledcor Properties Inc. and Anderson Pacific LLC. The proposed 35-story tower, planned at the northwest corner of Ocean Boulevard and Alamitos Avenue,...

 


Airbnb Teams Up With WeWork to Lure Business Travelers

Bloomberg Technology

 

Booking a room on Airbnb? Soon you’ll have the option to snag a desk or conference room at the closest WeWork location. Two of the world’s most valuable technology startups are teaming up in the hopes of luring young business travelers away...

 


Landlords See Flexible Office As An Amenity

GlobeSt

 

The concept of flexible office is expanding. While there are some landlords that have expressed concern about signing long-term leases with flexible office providers like WeWork, others are embracing the concept as a building amenity. The most recent example is Brookfield Property Partners partnership...

 

FULL TEXT


Owner of downtown property is taking bids to create a massive mixed-use development

Los Angeles Times

 

The owner of a two-block stretch just south of downtown Los Angeles is soliciting bids to develop the area into a massive $1.2-billion mixed-use project that would include a hotel, shops and residences.

The site south of the 10 Freeway is now occupied by just one main building, the 12-story Reef/LA Mart, which houses showrooms featuring home furnishings and other merchandise. It also contains a space for creative businesses called Maker City LA and the Magic Box events space. Much of the remaining area is devoted to parking.

The development, to be called Broadway Square Los Angeles, would cover 9.7 acres between West Washington Boulevard and West 21st Street to the north and south, and between South Main and South Hill streets to the east and west.

The owner, a family business called PHR LA Mart, first proposed the project in 2014 under the name SoLA Village, with estimates that it could cost more than $1 billion to develop.

But the name was changed while the owner secured the various city approvals and then decided to open the project’s ownership to the market, Laurie Lustig-Bower, an executive vice president of CBRE Group Inc., which is representing the owner, said Wednesday.

PHR LA Mart, led by managing partner Ara Tavitian, is now ready to entertain bidders who want to jointly develop the area as partners or buy the entitled property and develop it themselves, she said.

“The owner is open to different types of structures,” Lustig-Bower said.

The property could be worth $500 million or more, according to a real estate source knowledgeable of downtown property values.

Broadway Square Los Angeles has approvals for a 208-room hotel, 1,444 residential units that could be a combination of condominiums and apartments, and 152,000 square feet of retail space, she said.

It also has approval for 72,000 square feet of signage, including for continuous LED billboards, that would be visible from the 10 and 110 freeways, Lustig-Bower said.

“It’s going to change the skyline of downtown L.A.,” she said.

Bids for the project — which is being offered without an asking price — are due by Dec. 1. It is being marketed to potential bidders worldwide, Lustig-Bower added.

The announcement of the project’s listing for sale follows a deal that the owner reached with advocacy groups that had sought more affordable housing in the development.

The agreement will roughly triple the number of affordable units from 25 to 70, according to a statement released Tuesday by Strategic Actions for a Just Economy and PolicyLink.

L.A. City Councilman Curren Price, who represents the area, said the deal allowing the project to move forward was good news.

“For far too long, this area of the city has been ignored. The Reef will be a transformational project that brings much-needed economic development,” he said in a statement Wednesday.

-James F. Peltz 

Large-scale apartment development is underway in Marina Arts District

Los Angeles Times

 

A Los Angeles real estate developer is building 230 apartments in the city’s burgeoning Marina Arts District, a former industrial zone by Marina del Rey.

California Landmark Group, which has built other residential complexes in the neighborhood, has started construction on an apartment and office project at 13448 W. Beach Ave. called G8.

The $100-million complex will have six architecturally distinct structures of varying heights spanning a city block. The design by Rios Clementi Hale Studios and PK Architecture is intended improve the scale and massing of the large development.

“It’s over 800 feet long, like an 80-story building” on its side, said Ken Kahan, founder of California Landmark.

G8 will feature a pocket park, courtyards with swimming pools, shared indoor and outdoor workspaces, a fitness center and a rooftop deck.

The 25,000-square-foot office component will incorporate a former industrial building on the site with new construction.

The Marina Arts District is roughly bounded by Beach Avenue to the north, Maxella Avenue to the south, Del Rey Avenue to the west and Redwood Avenue to the east.

The neighborhood was a hodgepodge of small residences and a variety of industrial and manufacturing complexes when it was discovered in the 1990s by developers, who were looking to provide less expensive housing than was available in Santa Monica to workers at internet companies and other creative businesses.

Builders now tout the area's proximity to beaches, bike paths and jobs offered by the growing Silicon Beach technology cluster, which includes social media firm Snap Inc., automotive pricing website TrueCar Inc. and Dollar Shave Club.

G8 is the seventh and largest apartment project developed by California Landmark in the Marina Arts District since entering the market in 2006.

When construction of G8 is complete in late 2019, the firm will have completed more than 725 apartment units in the area.

The G8 units will be priced at about $3.50 to $3.75 per square foot per month, Kahan said, or nearly $3,000 for a one-bedroom unit. He expects renters will be about ages 25 to 50 but not necessarily all tech workers.

“We are not relying on Silicon Beach,” he said. Other “creative, entrepreneurial talent has migrated close to the water.”

About a fourth of the occupants of his buildings are entrepreneurs who have home offices, he said. “These are independent people.”

-Roger Vincent 

Westfield Unveils $1 Billion Redesign of Century City Mall

CoStar

 

It is a grand opening two years in the making. Westfield Corp. unveiled its $1 billion Westfield Century City redevelopment project this week. 

The Australia-based mall developer and owner added about 422,000 square feet to the 53-year-old shopping mall, including a new 149,000-square-foot, three-story Nordstrom that relocated from Westside Pavilion. 

Most of the 200 stores were open for this week’s grand opening, which attracted a host of VIPs ranging from Westfield Co-CEOs Steven and Lowy and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti to pop star Will I Am. 

Some of the newest stores that have opened include The Apple Store, Bonobos, Chan Luu, Cole Haan, Hugo Boss, Tesla, Jo Malone London, Kate Spade New York, Kendra Scott, Lululemon Athletica and Ted Baker. Amazon Books and Warby Parker will also have locations. 

The mall now offers an 18,000-square-foot outdoor entertainment venue called the Atrium and is introducing the first West Coast outpost of Eataly, a high-end Italian food hall, scheduled to open later this month. 

Other new food offerings include Tender Greens, The Crack Shack, Aloha Poke Co., Asian Box, Big Fish Little Fish, Spice Affair, Chick-Fil-A, Everytable, Mezza Garden, Panini Kabob Grill, Randy’s Donuts and Din Tai Fung, an internationally known Taiwanese restaurant, according to a Westfield release. 

The project also includes a new two-story Macy’s, and the three-level Bloomingdale’s was also remodeled. An Equinox fitness club and spa is also now on site, and other health and wellness options have been added to the mall, including a Caudalie Paris Spa, UCLA Health Clinic, the Gloveworx boxing and athletic performance studio and Forward, a members-only, full-service doctor’s office. Next Health, a cryotherapy clinic, is scheduled to open next year. 

Uber is also partnering with Westfield to open a first-of-its-kind Uber Lounge at the mall, one of 33 pick up and drop off lounges at its malls around the country. 

The changes at Westfield Century City, which had an initial price tag of around $800 million, began opening in phases in April of this year. Westfield took over as full owner of the property 15 years ago after acquiring CalPERS’s 50% stake. 

Westfield is also investing $300 million at Westfield UTC in San Diego.

-Karen Jordan

Take a look at the huge mixed use complex planned next to MacArthur Park

CurbedLA

 

Plans for a major new Westlake development that would tower over MacArthur Park are moving forward, with the Los Angeles City Planning Commission scheduled to weigh in on the project next week.

A report from planning staff (spotted by Urbanize LA) provides new details and an early glimpse of what the project might look like. Dubbed the Lake on Wilshire, it would convert a 14-story medical office building into a 220-room hotel. From the adjacent parking lot, a 41-story residential tower would rise, along with a five-story cultural center with an auditorium and classroom space.

The development is proposed for 1930 Wilshire Boulevard, just a block from both MacArthur Park and the subway stop across the street. It would include 478 apartments, including 39 set aside for very low-income tenants.

In addition to the auditorium, the cultural center would include a cafe, offices and conference rooms, and a rooftop garden. The hotel would have a restaurant on the ground-floor and a business center for guests.

In total, the complex would include 11 levels of parking, both above and below-ground, with 933 spots for cars and 629 bike spaces.

The complex is being designed by local architecture firm Archeon Group. Renderings show the glassy residential tower would have a wavy design, with undulating balconies and a rooftop amenity deck.

The cultural center would have a colorful and abstract facade with mosaic glass tiles and frescoes that plans say are inspired by artwork found at an ancient rock fortress in Sri Lanka.

If approved by the planning commission and city council, the project is expected to take about 32 months to build, with work wrapping up around 2020.

-Elijah Chiland

Long Beach's Tallest Building to Start Construction in 2018

urbanize.LA

 

Shoreline Gateway, the future tallest building in Long Beach, will break ground in early 2018 according to an announcement from co-developers Ledcor Properties Inc. and Anderson Pacific LLC.

The proposed 35-story tower, planned at the northwest corner of Ocean Boulevard and Alamitos Avenue, will feature 315 luxury apartments above 6,700 square feet of ground-floor commercial space and five levels of underground parking for 467 vehicles.

Plans call for a mixture of studio, one- and two-bedroom apartments, ranging from 520 square feet to 2,500 square feet in size.  The project will also include on-site amenities such as a community room at the 33rd floor, a rooftop pool and a large fitness center.

Anderson Pacific, which is also partnered with Qualico and Lantower Residential, first envisioned the tower in 2004 as a gateway to Downtown Long Beach.  Although market conditions set the project more than a decade, plans for the high-rise complex came roaring back to life in 2014 with the start of construction on its companion development - the Current.  The 17-story, 223-unit tower was completed next-door last year, and will share a 10,000-square-foot plaza with Shoreline Gateway.

Architecture firms Studio One Eleven, Carrier Johnson + Culture and RELM Studio are designing the project, which will rise 417 feet above ground level, making it the tallest building in Long Beach.

-Steven Sharp

Airbnb Teams Up With WeWork to Lure Business Travelers

Bloomberg Technology

 

Booking a room on Airbnb? Soon you’ll have the option to snag a desk or conference room at the closest WeWork location.

Two of the world’s most valuable technology startups are teaming up in the hopes of luring young business travelers away from hotels. Airbnb Inc. plans to begin a pilot program Thursday with WeWork Cos. to provide travelers with amenities commonly found in hotel business centers, such as a work desk, Wi-Fi, printers and meeting rooms, said people familiar with the project.

The companies will start with six cities: Chicago, New York, Los Angeles, Washington, London and Sydney, said the people, who asked not to be identified discussing an unreleased program. When renting a room on Airbnb’s site, corporate customers will be able to save a spot at a WeWork office nearest to where they’re staying. Airbnb and WeWork confirmed the partnership but declined to provide specifics on the program or future plans.

Business travel could be a lucrative opportunity for both companies. Airbnb rolled out a search tool in April for “Business Travel Ready” homes with a desk and high-speed internet. The San Francisco upstart said it expected corporate travel on its site to quadruple this year. But it may struggle to convince executives to trade turn-down service and conference rooms downstairs for a shared office space several blocks away.

WeWork, valued at about $20 billion, is the world’s largest provider of shared work spaces, renting desks to freelance workers, startups and larger companies that don’t want to sign an office lease. Airbnb, with a valuation of $31 billion, is the largest provider of home rentals. Both companies cater to a wave of younger consumers with an appreciation for modern design who are comfortable staying in strangers’ homes or working next to them.

-Olivia Zaleski

Landlords See Flexible Office As An Amenity

GlobeSt

 

The concept of flexible office is expanding. While there are some landlords that have expressed concern about signing long-term leases with flexible office providers like WeWork, others are embracing the concept as a building amenity. The most recent example is Brookfield Property Partners partnership with Convene, a flexible office provider that calls itself “workplace as a service.” Convene is unique in that it provides both highly designed flexible office space and tech-driven hospitality services—but perhaps most unique is that Convene partners directly with landlords to provide these services to existing tenants as well as Convene’s clients. As the firm makes its foray into the Los Angeles market with its Brookfield partnership, we sat down with Ryan Simonetti, co-founder and CEO of Convene, to talk about the platform and how it’s a peek inside the future of office space.

GlobeSt.com: Why is there such a high demand for flexible office space and office service platforms?

Ryan Simonetti: We are one of a few companies—obviously WeWork is the best known—that is really pioneering what we call workplace as a service. We believe that the way that people work has changed, and a lot of that is driven by technology and demographics. Today’s companies are looking to consume their real estate flexibly, particularly because there is ore complexity today involved in running a company. The ability to have a real estate strategy that allows you to scale up and scale down in real time is relevant. That is different than the way the real estate market has traditionally run, which as you know is historically made up of 10-year leases. We are seeing that that trend is changing and most companies now want to consume part of their real estate strategy flexibly.

GlobeSt.com: You have a unique platform. What do you mean by “workplace as a service,” and what services do you offer?

Simonetti: We call our platform workplace as a service, and we are partnering with companies like Brookfield to help them run their office buildings more like a full-service lifestyle hotel. We design on-demand meeting space, conference space, training space and co-working space with all of the hospitality amenities and services to not just support the flexible office users but the entire tenant base. That allows Convene’s clients to use the space on demand and it allows the tenants in the building to utilize the space to be more flexible and to tap into the hospitality infrastructure to deliver a different experience to their employees in the building. We’ll be doing room service catering to offices, for example. Or, we have a concierge platform and we’ll be planning community-based events.

GlobeSt.com: You mentioned WeWork earlier in the call. How are you approaching flexible office differently?

Simonetti: We are partnering the landlord and giving them our tool kit, and we are partnering with them to deliver this experience to the tenant. Anything that the landlord wants to deliver from a flexible space perspective, instead of leasing space in the building to a WeWork or Regis, Convene can do that in partnership with the landlord. That is the big difference between us and other co-working spaces. We are really the landlord’s response to companies like WeWork.

GlobeSt.com: Why do you think it is important to partner directly with the landlord rather than rent space in the building?

Simonetti: The difference is that we think of every single employee in every building that we are in as a member as opposed to just the people that are in our branded space. We are looking for ways to deliver a hospitality experience to them that is different from other office buildings. Our clients are predominately enterprise customers. We are only partnering with the best in class landlords that own class-A assets in class-A locations and want to deliver a class-A hospitality experience. We spend more money on our build outs and we are delivering a deeper level of hospitality. Every location has a culinary team and an onsite concierge, and we are able to deliver a differentiated experience to every tenant in the buildings where we operate.

GlobeSt.com: How is office changing, and how will landlords need to adapt?

Simonetti: Regardless of whether you work in technology or law or finance, we all really want the same things out of our lives. We want to be inspired; we want have purpose in our work; we want to work for a company that treats us well; and we all have a sense about what we want that experience to be. I don’t think that is unique to the creative class and I don’t think that it is unique to millennial. There is an experience that all class-A office buildings should be delivering regardless of the industry. Our view of the future of office is that every class-A building is going to have to deliver flexible space options to tenants and their employees and is going to have to deliver a technology-enabled hospitality experience.

-Kelsi Maree Borland

Daily Brief October 05, 2017 unsubscribe

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