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Equity Office Daily Brief: January 30, 2018

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Daily Brief

January 30, 2018

  EquilityOffice

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Sherman Oaks Office Building Sold for $3.8 Million

LA Business Journal

 

The 5,100-square foot medical office building at 15450 Ventura Blvd. in Sherman Oaks has sold for $3.8 million, according to Calabasas brokerage Marcus & Millichap. An individual private trust sold the two-story property to buyer 15450 Ventura Blvd LLC. Tenants at the property...

 


The Hearth & Hound, April Bloomfield's new Los Angeles restaurant, is nothing like a gastropub

L.A. Times

 

The first time I visited the Hearth & Hound in Hollywood, not long after the restaurant opened in December, I was happy to find icy oysters zapped with sorrel, whole roasted beets smeared with creamy blue cheese, Moroccan-ish roast lamb with carrots and...

 



BLOG & ONLINE NEWS

 

Scoping Out Progress at the 1,500-Unit Ferrante Development

Urbanize LA

 

Aerial images courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography showcase progress on Ferrante, developer Geoff Palmer's latest residential-retail complex in City West.  The project, Palmer's largest yet, is now taking form on a 10-acre property at 1000 W. Temple Street.  Palmer is now...

 


Study Finds There May Be Little Value In Workplace Wellness Programs

BisNow

 

Workplace wellness programs may not be worth the hype, according to a new report. The study, spearheaded by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, examined 3,300 employees over the course of one year. Half of the participants were provided access to iThrive...

 


32M SF Of Positive Office Absorption Expected Nationwide In 2018

BisNow

 

Though growth in U.S. office markets will be slow and steady in 2018,  fundamentals are expected to be healthy with net absorption reaching a total of 32.1M SF. Downtown markets, including Manhattan, San Francisco and Washington, D.C., will receive the most supply in the coming year, which will...

 


Office Absorption Slows In 4Q17

Globe St.

 

Office absorption slowed down in the fourth quarter of 2017, according to the fourth quarter office report from Newmark Knight Frank. While absorption is positive, it fell over the previous quarter and the previous year to 231,144 square feet from in the...

 

FULL TEXT


Sherman Oaks Office Building Sold for $3.8 Million

LA Business Journal

 

The 5,100-square foot medical office building at 15450 Ventura Blvd. in Sherman Oaks has sold for $3.8 million, according to Calabasas brokerage Marcus & Millichap.

An individual private trust sold the two-story property to buyer 15450 Ventura Blvd LLC.

Tenants at the property include Beauty Clinic Detox & Wellness Spa and doctor offices.

Martin Agnew and Ryan Rothstein-Serling in Marcus & Millichap’s Encino office represented both sides of the transaction.

-Joel Russell

The Hearth & Hound, April Bloomfield's new Los Angeles restaurant, is nothing like a gastropub

L.A. Times

 

The first time I visited the Hearth & Hound in Hollywood, not long after the restaurant opened in December, I was happy to find icy oysters zapped with sorrel, whole roasted beets smeared with creamy blue cheese, Moroccan-ish roast lamb with carrots and black lime, and possibly the best chicharrones I had ever tasted outside Baja. The wine list included a page — Diggin' in the Crates! — of Burgundies and such from the cellar of Beastie Boy Mike D. Some of the vegetable plates included snips of roots and tops, which struck me as the plant-kingdom equivalent of garnishing a rabbit sauté with its own kidneys. There was a white-chocolate flying saucer, glazed with a mosaic of passion-fruit seeds vivid enough to induce panic in even a casual trypophobe, and a fancy kind of banana bread. "Top Chef's" Tom Colicchio was yakking with friends a couple tables away.

April Bloomfield is a wonderful chef.

Still, I had difficulty processing my thoughts about the meal. This was only a week or so after the sexual misconduct allegations against the restaurant's co-owner, Ken Friedman, had been reported by Julia Moskin and Kim Severson in the New York Times. It was hard to avoid the idea that to dine there was in some way to endorse the supposed reprehensible acts of Friedman, who is on an indefinite leave from his restaurants.

Yet Bloomfield, who seems to have taken full control of the restaurants, is a force in American cooking at the moment, and her aesthetic of powerful small-plates cooking, simple yet so full-flavored that it often borders on the transgressive, has spread to restaurants all over the world. She is a product of the most formidable female-run kitchens in Britain (London's River Cafe) and the U.S. (Chez Panisse). She started the gastropub craze at New York's Spotted Pig — you can probably blame her for the deviled eggs and fancy cauliflower at every beer bar on Ventura Boulevard — and she turbocharged the modern steakhouse at the Breslin.

I will never quite forget my first taste of her fried pig's ear, her lamb with parsley or her lovely sheep-cheese dumplings moistened with a bit of browned butter. At the Spotted Pig, Bloomfield is the kind of chef who can persuade you to order a plate of roast kidneys even if it is the sort of thing you wouldn't eat on a bet, and even if you discover that you still don't like them, you at least understand why.

So, if you boycott the Hearth & the Hound to express your distaste for Friedman's alleged acts, are you silencing an important woman's voice? Does the ineffectiveness of Bloomfield's responses to Friedman make her complicit in his alleged misconduct? ("I know that it wasn't enough,'' she posted on Twitter.) Or could she have been as fearful of the wrath of a powerful industry figure as were the former employees who spoke out against him? Is it more important that she apparently brushed off complaints about Friedman, or that she did the proper thing and referred some of the women to outside labor counsel? Did she need to quit her job? If you had built an empire through your imagination and sweat, would a partner's alleged misbehavior cause you to dissolve it?

In a way, these are questions better suited to philosophers than to restaurant critics. Even then, it is difficult to plug your ideas about the dilemma into W.V. Quine's web of belief and expect to come up with a perfect answer. I have friends who refuse to set foot in the place, and I respect their values. I think it may be more important that Bloomfield's talent is heard. But I'm a white dude — this line is not mine to draw. And whichever side of the question you lean toward, it is hard not to feel queasy at the result.

The Hearth & Hound is a handsome place, a dark, sprawling den in the shell of the old expat pub Cat & Fiddle, with hunting prints on the walls, rough wooden tables and an unusual spaciousness — it was designed for people who may not want to be disturbed, and the dining patio out front is as large as the restaurant proper. The Cat & Fiddle was said to be haunted; it is hard to see where a ghost might hide in the renovated dining room. It was rumored that bits of "Casablanca" were filmed here, but any signs of Ilsa Lund and Capt. Renault have pretty much been erased too, unless they're flicking around the ashes from the huge wood-burning grill.

Surprisingly, the Hearth & Hound is nothing like a gastropub, although a lot of the activity does seem to cluster around the cocktail bar and the snacky stuff is limited to the odd pickle plate, fluffy dinner rolls whose recipe may include Jerusalem artichokes, and salty, finger-size stripes of whipped cod roe on toast that would seem to be the ideal accompaniment for a dry martini. If you are here looking for the dripping burgers, oozy beef tongue or devils on horseback for which the Spotted Pig is known, you're going to be out of luck.

In a way, the menu at the Hearth & Hound may be a little timid. Bloomfield had originally planned to open a Middle Eastern-ish restaurant in Los Angeles, and a lot of the plates lean that way: a coarse steak tartare with soaked kamut and harissa presented as a riff on Syrian kibbeh nayeh; sauteed spinach with house-made tahini sauce and a handful of smoked chickpeas; and a lovely plate of soft, sweet roasted squash buried under a pile of bitter greens cooked down with a dash of the North African spice mixture baharat. Tiny potatoes are scored halfway through in the manner of Hasselback potatoes, crisped, and served with chewy braised chard.

(You will find a certain similarity here to multiculti dishes on the menu at places like Kismet and Bäco Mercat — Bloomfield has clearly studied the rhythms of the local scene. You will also find a decent grilled hanger steak with black cabbage and a perfectly crisp flattened chicken seasoned with far too much salt.)

The Hearth & Hound

Chef April Bloomfield's Hollywood restaurant showcases her vegetable-centric cooking.

LOCATION

6530 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, (323) 320-4022, thehearthandhound.com

PRICES

Starters $12-$21; vegetables $12-$16; meat and fish, $28-$36.

DETAILS

Dinner 6 to 10 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 6 to 11 p.m. Friday and Saturday. The bar opens at 5:30 p.m. Credit cards accepted. Full bar. Valet parking.

RECOMMENDED DISHES

Whipped cod roe on toast; charred chicories with fromage blanc; cabbage with oyster emulsion; chicken with green peppercorn jus.

A basic salad of bibb lettuce leaves is much better than you'd think it might be, sprinkled with poppy seeds and slicked with a fresh, lemony emulsion the waiter identifies as "fermented ranch dressing." And my favorite dish in the restaurant is a wedge of steamed, lightly pickled cabbage flavored with meaty beef drippings and slumped onto a puddle of a briny oyster puree — the dish tastes like a marvelous sea creature you have never before encountered but can't wait to taste again.

Might your personal web of belief be expansive enough to include fancy banana bread after the cabbage instead of a slab of pork with quince? Professor Quine, I believe, would approve.

-Jonathan Gold

Scoping Out Progress at the 1,500-Unit Ferrante Development

Urbanize LA

 

Aerial images courtesy of Hunter Kerhart Architectural Photography showcase progress on Ferrante, developer Geoff Palmer's latest residential-retail complex in City West. 

The project, Palmer's largest yet, is now taking form on a 10-acre property at 1000 W. Temple Street.  Palmer is now demolishing a parking garage and a 10-story data center to allow for the construction of multiple seven-story buildings featuring 1,500 apartments, 30,000 square feet of retail space and parking for over 2,600 vehicles.

Ferrante is designed with Italian Renaissance-inspired architecture, similar to other projects such as Da Vinci and Orsini.

A timeline for the development has not been announced.

-Steven Sharp

Study Finds There May Be Little Value In Workplace Wellness Programs

BisNow

 

Workplace wellness programs may not be worth the hype, according to a new report.

The study, spearheaded by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, examined 3,300 employees over the course of one year. Half of the participants were provided access to iThrive — a wellness program that offers health coaching, biometric screenings, and education and awareness about healthy living — while the other half were not, Bloomberg reports.The study found that having access to a wellness program had little to no effect on employee behavior, and those in the control group who opted-in spent as much on healthcare as those who did not. Employees with better health were also found to be more likely to use the wellness programs than those with poor health.

In addition to these findings, a survey conducted during the process determined that the programs had little effect on overall job satisfaction and productivity.

These findings are still preliminary and many studies have found that programs can take as long as three years before producing any notable benefits.

It seems companies are not ready to give up on the wellness initiatives just yet. Approximately 25% of companies globally invested in wellness offerings last year. The industry also grew from $1B in 2011 to $6.8B in 2016, according to IBIS World analysis, Bloomberg reports.

Whether wellness programs are key to improving employee happiness and productivity remains to be seen, but many employers are committed to improving employee health and wellbeing overall. While some are implementing Fitwel and hiring chief happiness officers, others are investing in offices that provide features such as game rooms and meditation spaces. 

-Lara O'Keefe

32M SF Of Positive Office Absorption Expected Nationwide In 2018

BisNow

 

Though growth in U.S. office markets will be slow and steady in 2018,  fundamentals are expected to be healthy with net absorption reaching a total of 32.1M SF.

Downtown markets, including Manhattan, San Francisco and Washington, D.C., will receive the most supply in the coming year, which will lead to a modest increase in vacancy rates, CBRE reports.Similar to 2017, completions will also outpace net absorption nationwide. Overall rent growth is anticipated to decline from 2.4% in 2017 to 2% in 2018.

When it comes to occupiers, the tight labor market continues to be a challenge as does technology-driven competition. To compete, those in the financial, tech and even legal sectors are lowering space requirements and instead moving into prime office space with a focus on workplace design.

“Occupiers are taking a balanced approach to real estate strategy, continuing to pursue space efficiency while reinvesting savings into workplace enhancements that will help them attract and retain employees,” CBRE Global President of Advisory & Transaction Services/Occupier Whitley Collins said in a statement. 

As cloud technology and mobile work increases, flexible-serviced agreements like those offered by co-working company WeWork are also becoming a more popular option.

“We expect occupiers’ interest in shorter-term leases and third-party space aggregation to grow as these models are more widely tested and understood,” CBRE America’s Head of Occupier Research Julie Whelan said.

-Lara O'Keefe

Office Absorption Slows In 4Q17

Globe St.

 

Office absorption slowed down in the fourth quarter of 2017, according to the fourth quarter office report from Newmark Knight Frank. While absorption is positive, it fell over the previous quarter and the previous year to 231,144 square feet from in the previous quarter and 237,477 square feet in the fourth quarter of 2016. There has been a steady pattern of deceleration each year, according to the report. In 2014, there was a total of 3 million square feet of absorption. 2015 had a gain of 2.4 million square feet, 2016 recorded 2 million square feet, and 2017 posted 1.8 million square feet.

While the report shows steady deceleration, Steve Kolsky, an EP and managing director at Newmark Knight Frank, says that the numbers are deceptive. “I think that is a little bit misleading because those numbers are based on move-ins, not necessarily deals done,” Kolsky tells GlobeSt.com. “There were some pretty good deals that were done that are not yet reflected in those numbers. Tesla, for example did 130,000 square feet in Venice and Apple did 85,000 square feet in Culver City and neither of those are in the report.”

While he says that activity has been strong, he agrees that activity has slightly waned. However, that may be an effect of deal speed rather than demand. “I would say that there was a little bit of a slow down, but I think part of that was that it is taking longer for deals to get done these days,” he says. “In general, there is still a lot of velocity out there and deals in the market.”

Looking ahead into 2018, Kolsky says that all signs point to a healthy economy with a steady office market. “Right now, the signs are for a healthy market,” he explains. “All of the local real estate factors, show a strong real estate cycle. You have a lot of companies coming to the market and doing well, and there isn’t an over abundance of supply.”

One warning sign: the length of the cycle. Fundamentals remain strong, but investors are aware that we are getting late in the game. “We are in the late innings of a market cycle, if you look at a traditional market cycle,” says Kolsky. “History tells you that something has to give. There are just no signs of it yet.”

-Kelsi Maree Borland

Daily Brief January 30, 2018 unsubscribe

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