Spamdex - Spam Archive

Report spam

Send in your spam and get the offenders listed

Create a rule in outlook or simply forward the spam you receive to questions@spamdex.co.uk

Also in myequityoffice.com

Equity Office Daily Brief: April 26, 2018

Can't see content of this e-mail? Click HERE for browser version.
Daily Brief

April 26, 2018

  EquilityOffice

PRINT NEWS

 

Sinclair agrees to sell 23 TV stations to gain approval for Tribune deal

L.A. Times

 

Sinclair Broadcast Group will divest 23 TV stations in order to clear the path for its merger with Tribune Media, the company announced Tuesday. The sale of the stations would occur after the close of Sinclair's $3.9-billion acquisition of Tribune's 42 TV...

 


Three Valley-Area Companies Beat on Earnings

San Fernando Valley Business Journal

 

Avery Dennison Corp. Avery Dennison Corp. beat Wall Street expectations for earnings and revenue in its first fiscal quarter. The Glendale-based manufacturer of labeling and packaging materials had adjusted net income of $125 million, or $1.40 on a per-share basis, according documents filed...

 



BLOG & ONLINE NEWS

 

Employment Numbers Hinder Office Growth

Globe St.

 

Office leasing activity continued to slow in the first quarter of the year, according to a first quarter report from Newmark Knight Frank. Quarterly absorption was flat at 63,902 square feet, and the vacancy rate continued to remain at 14% as it...

 


Vacant Lot Near USC Poised for Mixed-Use Development

Urbanize LA

 

Over ten years ago, the Bethune Library near USC decamped for a new facility on Western Avenue.  Now the property it left behind is poised for a new mixed-use development. The Los Angeles City Council voted last week to enter into an exclusive...

 


An $18B Rent Bill, A $934M Loss, But WeWork's Membership And Occupancy Is Growing

BisNow

 

WeWork is looking to raise $500M of debt in the junk bond market, and the offering documents for the bonds give rare insight into the flexible working giant’s finances. A report from Bloomberg, which reviewed the bond documents, showed that the...

 


With $6 Trillion In Potential Investment On The Line, Opportunity Zones Begin To Take Shape

BisNow

 

Thousands of communities across the U.S. will soon have built-in incentives for investors to put money into their real estate and businesses thanks to the new Opportunity Zone federal program. Where those zones will be is beginning to come into focus.  The extended deadline for states and...

 


Mindspace Enters US With New Twist To The Co-Working Model

Globe St.

 

TEL AVIV, ISRAEL–Mindspace is a co-working startup headquartered here that has expanded through Europe and now has its sights set on the US. The company plans to open two co-working locations in the US in the coming months, one in Washington, DC...

 


Jobless claims fall to lowest level in 48 years

Market Watch

 

Initial jobless claims fell by 24,000 to 209,000 in the week ended April 21, the government said Thursday. Economists surveyed by MarketWatch had forecast a 230,000 reading. The more stable monthly average of claims declined by 2,250 to 229,250, the government said Thursday. The...

 

FULL TEXT


Sinclair agrees to sell 23 TV stations to gain approval for Tribune deal

L.A. Times

 

Sinclair Broadcast Group will divest 23 TV stations in order to clear the path for its merger with Tribune Media, the company announced Tuesday.

The sale of the stations would occur after the close of Sinclair's $3.9-billion acquisition of Tribune's 42 TV stations. The deal would give Sinclair ownership or operational control of 215 TV stations in 102 markets.

Sinclair did not disclose the price of the stations being divested.

Sinclair's announcement of the divestiture plans is expected to help move the deal along as it undergoes the scrutiny of the Department of Justice and the Federal Communications Commission for approval.

"While we continue to believe that we had a strong and supportable rationale for not having to divest stations, we are happy to announce this significant step forward in our plan to create a leading broadcast platform with local focus and national reach," Chris Ripley, president and chief executive of Sinclair, said in a statement.

Sinclair needed to divest the stations to comply with the limit on TV station ownership. Without the divestiture, the merger of Sinclair and Tribune would put the combined company over the current limit of stations that reach 39% of U.S. households.

The sale does not affect Tribune stations KTLA in Los Angeles or WPIX in New York; those are both still slated to go to Sinclair.

Once the stations are divested, Sinclair will still have agreements to operate many of the stations for their new owners. Such deals allowing companies to operate stations after transferring ownership are permitted under FCC local ownership deals.

One of the buyers of the divested stations is Armstrong Williams, a prominent conservative commentator. Sinclair has sold divested stations to Williams in the past in order to get larger acquisitions to comply with ownership regulations.

Sinclair is the largest owner of local television stations in the United States. It recently drew criticism for requiring the news anchors at its stations to read a scripted statement echoing claims by President Trump that TV news outlets offer "fake" or biased news.

In the divestiture deal announced Tuesday, Sinclair would sell Williams stations located in Seattle, Salt Lake City and Oklahoma City.

The buyer of stations in Houston and Dallas is Cunningham Broadcasting Co., which is named after the mother of Sinclair's executive chairman, David Smith. Those stations will also be operated by Sinclair.

Sinclair also announced it will divest the Tribune flagship station, WGN in Chicago. The buyer has not been named, but the station will also be operated by Sinclair.

One station, KPLR in St. Louis, would be sold to Iowa-based media company Meredith Corp. and nine would go to Standard Media Group, a New York-based limited liability company.

Sinclair also said it will unload seven other stations in Seattle, Cleveland, San Diego, Salt Lake City, Denver and Miami, but did not name a buyer. It's likely that 21st Century Fox will have an interest in acquiring those stations, as they are all Fox network affiliates.

-Stephen Battaglio

Three Valley-Area Companies Beat on Earnings

San Fernando Valley Business Journal

 

Avery Dennison Corp.

Avery Dennison Corp. beat Wall Street expectations for earnings and revenue in its first fiscal quarter.

The Glendale-based manufacturer of labeling and packaging materials had adjusted net income of $125 million, or $1.40 on a per-share basis, according documents filed Wednesday with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Earnings for the same period a year ago were $1.25 a share.

Analysts had expected earnings of $1.36 a share, according to Thomson Financial.

Revenue for the quarter was $1.78 billion, a jump of more than 13 percent from last year’s revenue of $1.57 billion. Analysts had expected revenue of $1.75 billion for Q1.

Avery Dennison stock (AVY) rose $1.27, or about 1.2 percent, on Wednesday to close at $106.67 on the New York Stock Exchange.

PS Business Parks Inc.

PS Business Parks Inc., an office and industrial real estate investment trust based in Glendale, beat Wall Street expectations for funds from operations and revenue in its first fiscal quarter.

The REIT reported funds from operations of $55.6 million, or $1.59 per share, for the period ended March 31. Revenue was $104 million.

Analysts had expected earnings of $1.50 a share and revenue of $101 million, according to Zacks Investment Research.

PS Business Parks (PSB) stock fell $1.56, or around 1.3 percent, on Wednesday to close at $113.89 on the New York Stock Exchange.

ASGN Inc.

ASGN Inc., formerly On Assignment Inc., reported better-than-expected first quarter adjusted earnings of $44 million, or 83 cents a share.

Analysts had predicted earnings of 75 cents a share, according to Thompson Financial.

ASGN Inc. (ASGN) on Wednesday on rose 43 cents, or a fraction of a percent, to close at $82.38 the New York Stock Exchange.

In the first two hours after-hours trading, the stock fell 8 cents to $82.30

Employment Numbers Hinder Office Growth

Globe St.

 

Office leasing activity continued to slow in the first quarter of the year, according to a first quarter report from Newmark Knight Frank. Quarterly absorption was flat at 63,902 square feet, and the vacancy rate continued to remain at 14% as it has for the last 10 quarters. While there were gains in some markets—namely Downtown Lo Angeles—the leasing velocity overall has slowed. While the knee jerk response is to assume economic issues, David Kluth of Newmark Knight Frank, says that the real reason is the high level of employment.

“Our research shows that white-collar employment is nearing peak levels, and white-collar employment is decelerating,” Kluth, an executive managing director and office market expert at NKF, tells GlobeSt.com. “The gains in white-collar job jobs has been under 2% for the last year and a half, and that has really had an impact on the Los Angeles office market. Job growth decelerating is really the reason we have seen leasing activity slow compared to prior quarters.”

While employment is reaching peak levels, Kluth maintains that we are still in a healthy market with healthy employment activity. This is really a conversation of slowed growth, not a declining market. “The market is not unhealthy, and we haven’t reached unhealthy levels of negative employment,” he says. “The market growth is just decelerating as we reach near peak levels of employment compared to prior quarters.”

While the overall L.A. office market leasing activity is slowing, Downtown Los Angeles did post net gains for the quarter. However, with one of the highest vacancy rates in the city, at 18.7%, this market is poised to see an impact from the slow down in the market. In general, Kluth says that space sits on the market in DTLA longer than any other market. “Negotiations in Downtown Los Angeles tend to be more prolonged,” he says. “The average downtime in Downtown Los Angeles tends to be 18 months, whereas in other markets downtime is typically 10 to 12 months. In other market, space leases more quickly, and that has resulted in a game of patience for landlords.”

There is room for growth, however. While white-collar employment is decelerating, other industries are growing, namely tech and entertainment. Growth in those sectors could help fuel more leasing activity in the market this year. “The tech and entertainment tenants are a growing segment of the market, and the hope is that those tenants will fill some of the vacancy,” says Kluth. “As the workforce that we have continues to be enriched, the market should feed off of itself.”

-Kelsi Maree Borland

Vacant Lot Near USC Poised for Mixed-Use Development

Urbanize LA

 

Over ten years ago, the Bethune Library near USC decamped for a new facility on Western Avenue.  Now the property it left behind is poised for a new mixed-use development.

The Los Angeles City Council voted last week to enter into an exclusive negotiating agreement with an entity known as NCNvision, LLC for the construction of a residential-retail project at 3685 S. Vermont Avenue.

Under the proposed agreement, the former library site would be sold by CRA/LA to NCNVision partners Nvision Studios and National CORE at fair market value to facilitate the development of mixed-income housing with retail space.  Plans call for a pair of mid-rise structures that would contain 52 units of market-rate housing, 45 units of workforce housing, 17 units of affordable housing, ground-floor retail, and space to be occupied by the Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator (LACI).

Nvision and CORE, in partnership with Capri Investment Group, have proposed a privately-financed development, according to Nvision Chief Executive Office Mike Echols.  The project - which has a nearly 50/50 split between market rate and affordable units - benefits from a nearby Expo Line station, which makes the project site eligible for development incentives through the Transit Oriented Communities guidelines.

The partnership with LACI is incorporated into the Bethune Center's design.  The smaller of the two buildings is proposed as a "passive energy" facility, in which amenities such as solar panels reduce energy consumption by 75 to 95 percent.  LACI, in addition to hosting some start-up and established portfolio companies within the building, will also monitor heat and energy use for the property.

The project also calls for an activated rooftop space, including a restaurant and a 10,000-square-foot urban farm.  While the restaurant will operate a portion of the farm, the remaining space would be used for commercial purposes.  Echols described the space as an opportunity to bring urban farming skills to South Los Angeles.

Nvision and CORE hope to file for the Bethune Center's entitlements by summer 2018, kicking off a 12-to-18-month approval period.  After receiving sign-offs from the City of Los Angeles, construction would occur over approximately two years - placing a completion date sometime in 2021 or 2022.

-Steven Sharp

An $18B Rent Bill, A $934M Loss, But WeWork's Membership And Occupancy Is Growing

BisNow

 

WeWork is looking to raise $500M of debt in the junk bond market, and the offering documents for the bonds give rare insight into the flexible working giant’s finances.

A report from Bloomberg, which reviewed the bond documents, showed that the company valued at $20B has an eye-watering rent bill and lost money last year, but is growing its membership and its occupancy.

WeWork has a global portfolio of 14M SF across 234 locations comprising 251,000 desks, the bond documents said. It has 220,000 members, up from 7,000 four years ago. It said that it had an 81% occupancy rate at the end of 2017, up 5% on the year before, and needs a location to be 60% occupied to make a profit.

However, the cost of acquiring those members, in the form of discounts, is increasing, and the revenue from each member dropped 6% to $6,928.

Revenue rose by 100% in 2017 but costs rose faster, Bloomberg said, causing the company to lose $934M last year. Its 2017 revenue was $886M and its costs were $1.8B, according to the Financial Times.

In terms of its rent liabilities, the bond documents showed that WeWork has committed to paying $5B in rent between now and 2022. It has committed to paying a further $13.2B from 2023 onward.

But Bloomberg pointed out that each building it occupies is leased through a separate special purpose vehicle, and while the parent company provides a guarantee on the leases, this guarantee lasts for an average of 12 months on a 15-year lease.

The documents also showed that founder Adam Neumann holds 65% of the voting power in the company and can dictate who sits on the board. 

-Mike Phillips

With $6 Trillion In Potential Investment On The Line, Opportunity Zones Begin To Take Shape

BisNow

 

Thousands of communities across the U.S. will soon have built-in incentives for investors to put money into their real estate and businesses thanks to the new Opportunity Zone federal program. Where those zones will be is beginning to come into focus. 

The extended deadline for states and territories to nominate census tracts as Opportunity Zones passed Friday, and as jurisdictions release their selections, distinct patterns are beginning to emerge around how states went about choosing zones and what areas were ultimately selected. 

How Did We Get Here?

The Opportunity Zones tax incentive was included in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act President Donald Trump signed into law in December. But the idea stems from a 2015 white paper from the Economic Innovation Group, a D.C.-based think tank that is now working closely with states to help implement the program. 

"We were looking for a way to connect private investors with needs in struggling communities across the country," EIG co-founder and CEO Steve Glickman told Bisnow. "You had a map emerging of two Americas after the recession where you have some communities doing as well as before and a number that never recovered. And the problem was only getting worse." 

The law gives tax benefits to investors that place unrealized capital gains into Opportunity Funds, which then invest in Opportunity Zones, a host of census tracts local governments decide have the most need and can best support the investment.

EIG's analysis shows there are more than $6 trillion in unrealized capital gains in the economy, between individual and corporate investors, that could potentially be deployed into Opportunity Zones.

States and territories were given an initial deadline of March 21 to nominate their Opportunity Zones, with the option for a 30-day extension. That 30-day extension deadline was Friday, and Glickman said he believes all 50 states and the District of Columbia have submitted their nominations, even if they have not all been made public. 

Trust The Process 

With a small window of time and no specific process given for how states should select their Opportunity Zones, local governments undertook a wide range of methods with varying levels of public engagement. 

Some states such as Colorado, Virginia and Mississippi took the lead early on in engaging the public and having a completely open and democratic process, according to Enterprise Community Partners Impact Investing Director Rachel Reilly, who has been closely following the process.  

Other states such as Georgia and Maryland had a closed process, she said, keeping their cards close to the vest and giving the public little information about how they made their selections. 

"Some governors saw this as fraught with political risk, and so there was a sentiment around trying to designate some of the tracts and feeling like they're picking winners and losers," Reilly said. 

A handful of local governments approached the selection with what Reilly calls a hybrid process, making their own initial designations and then taking public input. Washington, D.C., for example, completed its own initial analysis, selecting 18 core tracts that best fit the Opportunity Zone description, then sorted the remaining eligible tracts into three thematic clusters.

D.C. then put out a public survey to get a sense of where priorities were, and the majority of the 385 respondents picked the cluster with census tracts east of the Anacostia River, a relatively low-income part of the District. Economic development officials then spoke with local neighborhood leaders and council members, combining all of the public input with their own analysis of important factors before selecting 25 census tracts to designate.  

"We knew we were on a tight deadline so we wanted to strike the right balance of working quickly to meet the deadline and getting a solid amount of public input to inform the process," said Sharon Carney, economic strategy director for D.C.'s Office of the Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development. 

What Zones Were Selected?

D.C. ended up weighting its nominations heavily toward the lowest-income areas, and it was not alone. Initial analyses have found that states and territories with publicly announced Opportunity Zones largely prioritized the most distressed communities.

Enterprise Community Partners analyzed the 4,831 designated tracts that have been publicly announced across 20 states and four territories, and found that they skew toward lower-income census tracts. 

The designated Opportunity Zones had a median household income of $34K, compared to $44K for eligible census tracts that were not nominated and $58K for all tracts, Enterprise found. The homeownership rate in nominated areas was 45%, compared to 56% in eligible but not designated areas and 62% in all tracts. 

Roughly 73% of the designated Opportunity Zones were in urban or suburban areas, Enterprise found. The designated Opportunity Zone areas included larger African-American and Hispanic populations than the eligible or total tracts, the research showed. 

EIG's analysis also shows the designated tracts are largely in the most distressed communities, which Glickman said proves local governments understand the mission behind the program. 

"The intent of this program was to get capital and investment flows to places that were cut off," said Glickman, a former Obama administration official. "Predominately, we see that happening."

But states could not just choose the most distressed communities, Reilly said. They had to find a balance between areas with need and areas into which investors would be willing to put money. 

"The money that will be made available is market-driven equity capital," Reilly said. "Private equity is going to demand market-rate returns, so I don't know what the risk tolerance is going to be." 

With that in mind, she said local governments should designate areas where they are already making investments and have additional programs that can complement the Opportunity Zone incentives, giving investors more confidence in the area.

But if their selections swing too far in the direction of areas with an existing foundation of investment, states could risk reducing the impact of the program, some experts argue. Brookings Institution Senior Fellow Adam Looney said in a February report that there is a risk of the Opportunity Zone incentives becoming nothing more than tax breaks for developers already planning investments if states choose areas that are experiencing gentrification.

But in Looney's initial analysis of the publicly announced designations, he has found that states have largely chosen deeply impoverished places rather than up-and-coming neighborhoods, allowing the incentives to help spur growth in places that most need investment.  

In the public feedback D.C. received, Carney said some residents saw Opportunity Zone designations as a potential catalyst for displacement. She said D.C. looked closely at commercial investment already in the pipeline for some neighborhoods and tried to be cautious about choosing ares that were already experiencing socio-economic change. 

"You don't want the program to be just a tax break, and you don't want to incentivize something that would otherwise already happen," Carney said. "So we tried to think proactively about what areas were exhibiting high need and had adequate investment opportunities and tried to find a balance." 

When Will Communities Feel An Impact? 

Now that the Opportunity Zone nomination deadline has passed, the law gives the U.S. Treasury Department 30 days to certify the designated census tracts. Then, the Treasury must lay out the rules for how funds can be set up and deploy capital to Opportunity Zones before the investment can begin. 

Once the program is off and running, Glickman said EIG will focus on outreach to investors to educate them about how to best utilize Opportunity Zones. He said the organization is working to form a coalition of interested investors, with nearly 50 already on board. With a $6 trillion pool of money to work from, he said it has the potential to be the largest economic development program in the U.S., if it is done right. 

"The program only works if investors are willing to make bets in communities, and it's going to require a whole new industry and asset class built around it," Glickman said. "You don't usually have fund managers doing low-income community investing, so it's going to be an ongoing process of building capacity with investors over the next couple of years."

To take advantage of the tax incentive, the law requires reinvestment of capital gains within 180 days of a sale or exchange. The temporary program only applies to gains made before Dec. 31, 2026, and the earlier people invest, the more benefits they can capture, so Reilly expects investors will start setting up funds soon. 

"Investors will have to time it well and read the tea leaves if they're hoping to take advantage immediately," Reilly said. "You will see some early adopters." 

Glickman also expects to see some early movers, and he believes more risk-averse investors will jump into the program over time as it becomes better understood. Carney expects funds to begin forming in early 2019, with investments being made as the year progresses. 

"I think there will be some short-term activity piping up in 2019, and that’s probably where we have an opportunity to shape a lot of it in partnership with the investment community and residents," Carney said. "Over time it will hopefully accrue to a broader set of stakeholders." 

-Jon Banister

Mindspace Enters US With New Twist To The Co-Working Model

Globe St.

 

TEL AVIV, ISRAEL–Mindspace is a co-working startup headquartered here that has expanded through Europe and now has its sights set on the US. The company plans to open two co-working locations in the US in the coming months, one in Washington, DC and one in San Francisco. It also has its eye on other US locations, although its vice president of Real Estate Itay Banayan declined to say where they would be.

As it enters the US market Mindspace is bringing its own twist on the co-working model: besides high-end office space it also offers curated classes and events for users. These events can range from morning yoga to meditation to a workshop on ensuring a product/marketing fit. These examples, in fact, were taken from a list of events that Mindspace held this month in its London location. The Hamburg location held similar functions in April: a beer tasting and networking session, a seminar on marketing solutions for startups by Google and another on e-commerce.

All together there are about 30 to 40 events a month at a Mindspace location, Banayan tells GlobeSt.com. Most are about business but some are distinctly personal and even poignant. For Israel’s Holocaust Memorial Day, Mindspace had two survivors in their 80s speak to a crowded room in the Tel Aviv location about their experiences. “We connect with people not only on a professional levels but also to cultivate personal experiences too,” Banayan says.

Like other co-working providers, Mindspace is gravitating towards enterprise users, a group that has become quite mindful of the benefits of using this type of space in lieu of a long-standing lease. “Occupancy costs with us will be cheaper than any traditional lease that they might sign,” Banayan says. There are also the advantages of the flexibility that a co-working space offers, allowing the company to grow and shrink its space needs as necessary, he adds.

The curated events that Mindspace offers is part of the appeal to these companies, which are well aware that a pleasant office environment goes far in keeping employees happy and engaged, Banayan also says. In a way, he says, Mindspace is not only a co-working provider but also serves as a defacto supplement to HR. “Companies see tremendous value by joining us.”

Mindspace’s first US facility will open in Washington DC this summer followed by San Francisco. In addition, the company is looking at several other markets in the US. “We started the site selection process over a year ago, using our criteria of what we think would be a good city for us.”

-Erika Morphy

Jobless claims fall to lowest level in 48 years

Market Watch

 

Initial jobless claims fell by 24,000 to 209,000 in the week ended April 21, the government said Thursday. Economists surveyed by MarketWatch had forecast a 230,000 reading.

The more stable monthly average of claims declined by 2,250 to 229,250, the government said Thursday.

The number of people already collecting unemployment benefits, known as continuing claims, dropped by 29,000 to 1.84 million.

What happened: Jobless claims continue to fall, though the latest decline may have been exaggerated by the timing of the Easter holiday and spring break.

In New York, for example, claims soared in mid-April and fell sharply a week later. Some school employees such as bus drivers and cafeteria workers can collect benefits for the week the miss when school is closed.

Whatever the case, layoffs are now near the lowest level since early in the first term of President Richard Nixon.

Big picture: Excellent. Most workers who want a job can find one and companies are still hiring at a rapid pace. Wages are also rising, though not as fast as they normally do when the labor market is this strong.

The strength of the labor market all but assures the nearly nine-year-old economic expansion will continue for some time to come and perhaps set a record.

What they’re saying: “It appears that the dip is due to an anomaly related to New York school workers,” said Thomas Simons, senior money market economist at Jefferies. “The BLS indicated that these workers returned to work this week, leading to the big decline in the headline number. We will probably see a return to the 220,000 to 240,000 range that has prevailed for the majority of this year.”

Market reaction: The Dow Jones Industrial Average DJIA, +1.16% and Standard & Poor’sSPX, +1.10% were set to open higher in Thursday trades. The 10-year Treasury yieldTMUBMUSD10Y, -0.87%   was little changed at 2.99%.

-Jeffry Bartash

Daily Brief April 26, 2018 unsubscribe

---------------------------

All titles, content, publisher names, trademarks, artwork, and associated imagery are trademarks and/or copyright material of their respective owners. All rights reserved. The Spam Archive website contains material for general information purposes only. It has been written for the purpose of providing information and historical reference containing in the main instances of business or commercial spam.

Many of the messages in Spamdex's archive contain forged headers in one form or another. The fact that an email claims to have come from one email address or another does not mean it actually originated at that address! Please use spamdex responsibly.


Yes YOU! Get INVOLVED - Send in your spam and report offenders

Create a rule in outlook or simply forward the junk email you receive to questions@spamdex.co.uk | See contributors

Google + Spam 2010- 2017 Spamdex - The Spam Archive for the internet. unsolicited electric messages (spam) archived for posterity. Link to us and help promote Spamdex as a means of forcing Spammers to re-think the amount of spam they send us.

The Spam Archive - Chronicling spam emails into readable web records index for all time

Please contact us with any comments or questions at questions@spamdex.co.uk. Spam Archive is a non-profit library of thousands of spam email messages sent to a single email address. A number of far-sighted people have been saving all their spam and have put it online. This is a valuable resource for anyone writing Bayesian filters. The Spam Archive is building a digital library of Internet spam. Your use of the Archive is subject to the Archive's Terms of Use. All emails viewed are copyright of the respected companies or corporations. Thanks to Benedict Sykes for assisting with tech problems and Google Indexing, ta Ben.

Our inspiration is the "Internet Archive" USA. "Libraries exist to preserve society's cultural artefacts and to provide access to them. If libraries are to continue to foster education and scholarship in this era of digital technology, it's essential for them to extend those functions into the digital world." This is our library of unsolicited emails from around the world. See https://archive.org. Spamdex is in no way associated though. Supporters and members of http://spam.abuse.net Helping rid the internet of spam, one email at a time. Working with Inernet Aware to improve user knowlegde on keeping safe online. Many thanks to all our supporters including Vanilla Circus for providing SEO advice and other content syndication help | Link to us | Terms | Privacy | Cookies | Complaints | Copyright | Spam emails / ICO | Spam images | Sitemap | All hosting and cloud migration by Cloudworks.

Important: Users take note, this is Spamdex - The Spam Archive for the internet. Some of the pages indexed could contain offensive language or contain fraudulent offers. If an offer looks too good to be true it probably is! Please tread, carefully, all of the links should be fine. Clicking I agree means you agree to our terms and conditions. We cannot be held responsible etc etc.

The Spam Archive - Chronicling spam emails into readable web records

The Glass House | London | SW19 8AE |
Spamdex is a digital archive of unsolicited electronic mail 4.9 out of 5 based on reviews
Spamdex - The Spam Archive Located in London, SW19 8AE. Phone: 08000 0514541.