Spamdex - Spam Archive

Report spam

Send in your spam and get the offenders listed

Create a rule in outlook or simply forward the spam you receive to questions@spamdex.co.uk

Also in myequityoffice.com

Equity Office Daily Brief: October 23, 2015

Can't see content of this e-mail? Click HERE for browser version.
Daily Brief

October 23, 2015

  EquilityOffice

PRINT NEWS

 

This Is Your Office, If Ex-Goldman Twins Get Their Way

Bloomberg Business

 

'Healthy buildings' make happy workers, they say. The pitch could make them a fortune, if their bet on wellness in real estate pans out. Last October a New York startup called Delos Living, founded by twin brothers who were once partners at...

 


Selleck Buys Chatsworth Building for $5.2 Million

San Fernando Valley Business Journal

 

A Chatsworth manufacturing facility that served as the headquarters of the Tamrac company for the past 25 years has been sold to Selleck Development Group of Westlake Village. The 55,000-square-foot, two-story building at 9240-9244 Jordan Ave. sold for $5.2 million, or...

 


Work Starts on $80 Million Arts District Retail and Office Project

Los Angeles Downtown News

 

DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES—Yet another major Arts District development is underway. This morning, developers ASB Real Estate Investments and Blatteis & Schnur, Inc. broke ground on At Mateo. The $80 million project on a 3.5-acre plot at Palmetto and Mateo streets will create...

 


CalPERS is slowly digging its real estate portfolio out of a big hole

Los Angeles Times

 

The Achilles' heel of the vast CalPERS fund has been its real estate portfolio, but there are signs that the long-troubled segment is finally turning around. Investment returns for the California Public Employees' Retirement System have been dragged down by its $27-billion...

 



BLOG & ONLINE NEWS

 

Wellbeing Increases Employee Productivity

GlobeSt.com

 

LOS ANGELES—Positive employee wellbeing can help to boost productivity and employee engagement. At the recent CoreNet Global Summit, a three-day summit exploring innovation in the commercial real estate sector, JLL hosted a morning yoga class to promote the idea of employee...

 


Federal Public Defenders Office Renews 50k sf Space in Downtown Los Angeles

RENTV.com

 

The Federal Public Defenders Office (GSA) has agreed to a renewal of its 50.1k sf space in downtown Los Angeles. The government agency has agreed to a new 10-year deal worth $16.8 mil, or an average of around $2.79/sf/mo. GSA’s space...

 


HFF Arranges $42 Mil Refi Loan on Downtown LA Medical Office Building

RENTV.com

 

Boulevard Investment Group Inc has refinanced Samaritan Medical Tower with a new $42.7 mil loan that was arranged by Marc Schillinger of HFF. The 10-year, fixed-rate CMBS loan is interest-only throughout the entire term. Samaritan Medical Tower, a 146.4k sf medical office...

 


How to Attract (and Keep) Asian Investors in LA

Bisnow

 

With a downturn in China’s economy, Chinese investors are shifting capital to core US markets and much of this money is landing in LA. “Geography is the real reason for Chinese investing here,” says Rising Realty Partners COO Chris Rising (with Athens...

 


Looking Towards the Past and Future with Studio One Eleven's Alan Pullman

Bisnow

 

Before founding Studio One Eleven, senior principal Alan Pullman was working at a commercial firm with a focus on retail properties. Throughout the 1990s, Alan was designing regional malls and shopping centers across the US, but, by a sheer stroke of...

 

FULL TEXT


This Is Your Office, If Ex-Goldman Twins Get Their Way

Bloomberg Business

 

'Healthy buildings' make happy workers, they say. The pitch could make them a fortune, if their bet on wellness in real estate pans out.

Last October a New York startup called Delos Living, founded by twin brothers who were once partners at Goldman Sachs, published what may be the most marketable proposition in real estate short of a front lawn overlooking the Fountain of Youth.

It's a manual they called The Well Building Standard and styled after the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program. It offers a set of guidelines for designing buildings that promise to make people happier, healthier, and more productive—just by being inside them.

Which sounds like a pretty good deal, considering the myriad threats to good health lurking in your average office building. Salty snacks, stale air, bad lighting, carpets that spit up VOCs, elevators that promote your sedentary lifestyle.

Solve those problems (and dozens more like them) and office workers might work harder, sleep better, and get sick less—to say nothing of the lucrative opportunities in residential construction, school buildings, and other environments. About 4.6 billion square feet of real estate worldwide has achieved LEED certification since 2000. Paul Scialla, who co-founded Delos Living with his identical twin, , in 2009, says that number serves as a proxy for the kind of market he hopes to reach.

“This could be bigger than anything in real estate since the invention of the roof,” Scialla says. He and have spent the last five years building a sprawling set of ventures under the Delos umbrella to improve life indoors and, they hope, make a buck.

Those include a public benefit corporation (a portion of profits go to charity) to administer the Well Building Standard, a consulting operation, and a venture arm that invests in new technology. Also a line of business that’s partnering with Leonardo DiCaprio to develop an eco-resort off the coast of Belize and that retrofits hotel rooms with features like a dawn simulator alarm clock and shower water infused with vitamin C.

The challenge now is convincing architects, builders, corporations, office workers, and hotel guests that the promise of buildings that promote healthier living can be fulfilled. “Who’s going to say they don’t want healthier spaces?” says Scialla, 41. “The doubts, or the follow-on questions, are: I love it, but can it really be done?’”

This month, Scialla (shalla) got a $108 million vote of confidence in the form of new investment from Jeff Vinik, who owns the National Hockey League's Tampa Lightning; Hong Kong developer Sino-Ocean Land Holdings; and Cascade Investment, an asset management firm owned by Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates. The company had previously raised $50 million.

“I think the wellness movement is going to grow and become of paramount importance to in the decades ahead,” Vinik says.

For a revolutionary idea, it's pretty old. People moved indoors a long time ago to stay safe and warm. Indoor plumbing is one of the great public health innovations in human civilization. The design and public health professions were closely aligned before diverging in the early 20th century, according to the American Journal of Public Health. The two fields began to converge again about a decade ago, amid increasing concern about obesity and environmental sustainability.

That spawned reams of research on subjects like the health benefits of stairwells and the relationship between noise pollution and mental health, and interest from a wide variety of players. One initiative, sponsored jointly by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, suggested that health outcomes should be the concern of anyone financing urban renewal projects. Wellness became a watchword in luxury condominiums and affordable housing.

As those lines of research were gathering steam, Scialla was running cash trading for U.S. interest rate products at Goldman, and reading about environmentally conscious buildings. “Every article I read was screaming the word sustainability,” he said. “Like green, green, green. I thought, ‘That makes sense, but what about people?’

Soon the Scialla brothers were experimenting on their Manhattan loft, installing amenities including cork floors to improve posture and a filtration system that infuses the air with aromatherapy. In March 2013, they left Goldman to run Delos full time. (Their sister, Crystal Scialla, is the company's general counsel.) Later that year, they started marketing luxury condos in Manhattan’s East Village that had been decked out with wellness features. Deepak Chopra, the best-selling author and a member of Delos’s board, bought one. The penthouse, most recently listed for $30.5 million, was reported sold earlier this month.

Delos doesn’t plan to develop any more buildings itself, Scialla said. Instead, it is courting developers to adopt the Well Building Standard so it can profit from services and fees associated with the certification process, whoever puts the buildings up. It costs up to $10,000 to register a building with the International Well Building Institute (IWBI), Scialla's public benefit corporation, and from 8 to 23 cents per square foot to go through the certification process; for office buildings, that usually works out to less than $100 per employee, Scialla says.

Builders are currently seeking Delos certification for 20 million square feet of real estate, still a fraction of the market the Scialla brothers dream of. That includes a $2 billion mixed-use project along the Tampa waterfront being developed by Vinik’s Strategic Property Partners and Cascade Investment that will feature landscaping designed to cut down on pollen and air pollution meters to tell joggers the best times to start a run.

Now the challenge is convincing developers to build healthier buildings, and to hire Delos to help. Later this year, IWBI plans to certify 1,500 accredited professionals to administer the Well Building Standard. Earlier this month, Delos announced plans to fund a lab at the Mayo Clinic to study wellness in the built environment.

"Metrics are challenging when it comes to this topic. We can’t say buildings make you healthier,” says Suzanna Kelley, managing director for strategic initiatives at the American Institute of Architects. The organization is teaming up with academic institutions on research into wellness and buildings, but Kelley cautions that “humans lead complex lives intertwined with many kinds of factors. Because you work in one sort of building doesn’t mean you’re not going to get cancer or have a heart attack someday.”

Still, office workers don’t have to live forever to make these solutions work for landlords and tenants, who can offer them as a way to attract employees.

A few years ago, the commercial real estate firm CBRE did away with assigned workspaces at its Los Angeles headquarters and had employees choose where to sit each day. That promiscuous arrangement seemed like a good idea, until someone caught a cold. CBRE’s search for a solution led the company to Delos, which suggested using ultraviolet lights to sterilize shared work-spaces at the end of the day. While it was at it, CBRE decked out the L.A. office with 50 wellness features, including ergonomic furniture, a juice station, and non-porous countertops to discourage bacterial growth.

“We said, wouldn’t it be interesting if we could create an environment where people could be more productive,” says Lewis Horne, president of CBRE’s Greater Los Angeles office. “What if we could make people feel healthier? What if we could make them feel better about being here?”

Horne doesn't know how many sick days the upgrades have saved, but internal research shows that 92 percent of new employees said the new space has improved their sense of well-being.

“I think it’s helped with recruiting,” Horne says.

-Patricia Clark

Selleck Buys Chatsworth Building for $5.2 Million

San Fernando Valley Business Journal

 

A Chatsworth manufacturing facility that served as the headquarters of the Tamrac company for the past 25 years has been sold to Selleck Development Group of Westlake Village. The 55,000-square-foot, two-story building at 9240-9244 Jordan Ave. sold for $5.2 million, or about $95 a square foot, according to real estate data provider CoStar Group Inc.

The building, which comprises 27,000-square-feet of research and development space and a 28,000-square-foot office, was sold by Ryan and Jesslyn Cyr, who founded Tamrac in 1977. The company was a leading manufacturer of camera cases that had sales distribution throughout the U.S., Canada, Europe and Japan.

The Cyrs sold their business to Gura Gear of Ogden, Utah, which has continued marketing Tamrac cases but has no intention of keeping the business in Chatsworth or opening a local office, said Scott Katcher, corporate managing director at real estate brokerage Savills Studley. He and Bart Pucci, a Savills senior managing director, represented the sellers in the transaction.

“My clients are retiring. Disposing of the real estate was a critical part of their exit plan and the timing was right to take advantage of activity in the marketplace,” Pucci said

Buyer Daniel Selleck purchased the property, which was vacant at the time of the sale, as an investment and plans to renovate it and lease it to one or two tenants, Katcher said.

-Karen E. Klein

Work Starts on $80 Million Arts District Retail and Office Project

Los Angeles Downtown News

 

DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES—Yet another major Arts District development is underway.

This morning, developers ASB Real Estate Investments and Blatteis & Schnur, Inc. broke ground on At Mateo. The $80 million project on a 3.5-acre plot at Palmetto and Mateo streets will create 125,000 square feet of retail and restaurant space with 30-35 stores and eateries. The development will also contain 50,000 square feet of creative office space in four buildings.

The project, which will contain 550 parking spaces in a multi-level structure, is scheduled to be complete in late 2016.

“The inspiration for At Mateo’s design has been drawn from the Arts District’s past — once citrus groves and vineyards, later manufacturing and rail yards, and more recently an enclave for artists and cultural pioneers,” said Robert Schnur, co-chair of Blatteis & Schnur, in a prepared statement.

Architect Keith Ray is overseeing the project’s master plan, which makes heavy use of repurposed materials, including Italian cobblestones imported more than 150 years ago, and bricks from James Dean’s Chicago high school.

ASB and Blatteis & Schnur have partnered on more than $400 million worth of developments across the United States over the last decade.

-Jon Regardie

 

CalPERS is slowly digging its real estate portfolio out of a big hole

Los Angeles Times

 

The Achilles' heel of the vast CalPERS fund has been its real estate portfolio, but there are signs that the long-troubled segment is finally turning around.

Investment returns for the California Public Employees' Retirement System have been dragged down by its $27-billion investment in office buildings, housing developments, warehouses and shopping centers. By the fund's own admission, it was nothing short of a disaster area.

The performance was so bad that it raised the question of why the nation's largest public pension fund even bothered with the volatile, high-cost sector in the first place.

But a recent study by consulting firm Wilshire Consulting Inc. found that the portfolio finally pulled ahead of its peers by a solid margin, posting a 15.5% annual return — compared with 12.7% for its benchmark — in the five years that ended June 30, an important milestone. Returns on CalPERS real estate were in the top 5% of big pension funds for the period, Wilshire said.

As part of the turnaround, the fund is moving away from such speculative investments as a 53-story Sacramento condo development that ran aground in 2007, in favor of a string of already-leased shopping centers and other safer bets. And it plans to slash the number of investment advisors by more than 75%.

"We're digging ourselves out of really negative performance," said Ted Eliopoulos, who ran the real estate operation for seven years before being named CalPERS' chief investment officer in 2014. "These are favorable numbers and a good sign our approach is working."

To be sure, the portfolio has a ways to go. Its performance over 10 years is a paltry 4.1%, far below its benchmark of 8.2% and in the bottom half of its peers.

But even CalPERS critics said the fund appears to be heading in the right direction.

"We're cautiously optimistic," said Craig Leupold, president of Green Street Advisors, a Newport Beach real estate research firm that has been critical of pension funds' approach to real estate investing in general and CalPERS' performance in particular.

The returns matter.

Charged with paying benefits to 1.7 million current and future retirees, CalPERS has the power to compel government employers to make up any shortfall in its fund. The pension plan was only about 74% funded at the end of June, according to a spokesman. In July, the overall fund reported returns of just 2.4% for its fiscal year, which ended June 30, far below its 7.5% investment target.

The bad year was mostly the result of a weak global stock market. The problem wasn't real estate, which rang up returns of 16.9% and placed it in the top 10% of its peers.

CalPERS was a pioneer among public pension funds in investing in private real estate, which was touted for its frequently high returns and its so-called diversification benefits, which allows its value to rise and fall independently of stocks and bonds.

Like investments in private equity, money poured into private real estate is expensive to manage.

Together the two sectors accounted for the bulk of the $1.2 billion in investment fees that CalPERS paid in its 2014 fiscal year, the latest annual fee statistics available. The fund plans to disclose soon how much it paid last year in private equity performance fees, which are expected to be even higher.

CalPERS' real estate woes can be traced to the roaring market bubble of 2003 to 2006, when the fund dumped about $16 billion into so-called core investments — fully leased buildings in major markets — and committed more than $30 billion to high-risk, high-reward land developments; far-flung foreign markets such as India; and other speculative schemes, such as the complex redevelopment of New York's massive Stuyvesant Town housing project.

During those highflying days, CalPERS real estate managers, much like their private equity counterparts, were caught up in the so-called pay-to-play controversy in which investment firms paid millions to intermediaries, known as placement agents, to help win business with the fund.

Eliopoulos, a lawyer and former deputy to former state Treasurer Phil Angelides, was hired to take over the real estate portfolio in January 2007. His modest efforts to steer toward more conservative investments failed to head off a historic debacle.

Real estate everywhere crashed in the run-up to the Great Recession. A key benchmark fell 22.1% for the year that ended Sept. 30, 2009, and CalPERS real estate posted staggering losses of 48.8% in the same period.

In 2011, Eliopoulos instituted a drastically more conservative strategy, shifting about 80% of the portfolio into core properties, such as fully leased buildings in stable markets.

Last February, Paul Mouchakkaa, an executive with Morgan Stanley's real estate arm, was appointed real estate chief to succeed Eliopoulos, who had been promoted.

In an interview, Mouchakkaa said a strong market for real estate assets in recent years has eased the fund's shift from speculative to safer investments. "It's not a terrible time to sell," he said.

Mouchakkaa has been implementing another phase of the strategy: dramatically cutting back over the next several years on the number of investment advisors the fund hires to oversee real estate — to about 15 from about 70.

Mouchakkaa, an advisor to CalPERS during the recession seven years ago, said a lesson learned was "keeping things a little more simple."

He will be phasing out poorly performing funds, such as BlackRock Inc.'s Europe Parallel Property Fund II, which posted annualized losses 16% over the five years that ended March 31, and CBRE Strategic Partners Europe Fund III, which had annualized losses of more than 10% in the period.

He'll also be cutting out some better performers, including Centerline Urban Capital I, which posted 50% annualized returns on residential development during the period, because they no longer fit into the fund's strategy.

Nine managers will end up handling about 80% of the portfolio, led by GI Partners, a San Francisco firm that focuses on warehouses that will oversee 19% of the real estate investments. The rest will be given in smaller pieces to other managers.

-Dean Starkman

Wellbeing Increases Employee Productivity

GlobeSt.com

 

LOS ANGELES—Positive employee wellbeing can help to boost productivity and employee engagement. At the recent CoreNet Global Summit, a three-day summit exploring innovation in the commercial real estate sector, JLL hosted a morning yoga class to promote the idea of employee wellbeing. After the class, Bernice Boucher, managing director and lead of the global workplace strategy group in the Americas at JLL, sat down with us for an exclusive interview to discuss the importance of wellbeing in the workplace and how classes like this play a role in boosting wellbeing. 

GlobeSt.com: Why is workplace wellbeing important in an office?

Bernice Boucher: The direct link between integrated wellbeing factors and higher employee engagement is real. Wellbeing refers to how the employee feels—mentally and physically—in the workplace. The concept includes everything from giving employees choices about where and when to work to creating an appealing environment and providing the right tools for the job. So, it is a combination of tangible and intangible factors that affect how an employee feels about being at the workplace, and therefore how well they perform.

Improving employee wellbeing means making thoughtful decisions about the nature of the workplace environment. Today’s workplace is so much more than a physical structure where work happens. It can be a strategic asset that will actually influence ‘how’ work happens.

GlobeSt.com: Do group or onsite yoga classes like this help?

Boucher: Onsite fitness classes and wellness programs are in important tactic for employees with regard to health and convenience, and boosting energy levels for the participants. These programs can also help build a sense of camaraderie. However, wellness activities are only the beginning of creating a sense of wellbeing in the office. These activities should be included in a well-being program but are only one aspect of the bigger picture. 

GlobeSt.com: What can employers do to boost workplace productivity?

Boucher: You should take a holistic look at the workplace environment to see what is interfering with employee focus and productivity. Sometimes, when you can’t measure productivity, you measure what gets in the way of productivity. Something as basic as room temperature can be a distraction—when employees are too hot or too cold, the workplace is not an enjoyable place to be. Another common ‘crime against productivity’ is noise, so can you carve out some private, quiet workspaces for heads-down work? Or, your office may not provide enough access to natural light, which research shows can improve employee mood and productivity. Can you reconfigure your facilities to make more windows available to everyone?

Workplace design features are a good place to start because those are things that employees complain about and that can create a drag on productivity. Just adding plants to the environment can help, because people feel a very natural and calming connection to plants. You can take a number of steps to improve the physical environment to enhance wellbeing and productivity. Then, you can take your efforts a step further with strategic programs that give employees a sense of purpose and connect their daily work to the organization’s larger strategy.

-Kelsi Maree Borland

Federal Public Defenders Office Renews 50k sf Space in Downtown Los Angeles

RENTV.com

 

The Federal Public Defenders Office (GSA) has agreed to a renewal of its 50.1k sf space in downtown Los Angeles. The government agency has agreed to a new 10-year deal worth $16.8 mil, or an average of around $2.79/sf/mo. GSA’s space takes the entire building located at 321 E. 2nd St in the city’s Little Tokyo Historic District.

Built in 1963 and situated on .25 acres, the 10-story building, located in the heart of Little Tokyo, is within walking distance to restaurants and business service amenities. It is just a couple of blocks east of LA’s civic center and City Hall.

John Anthony, Chris Steck, and Chris Giordano of Charles Dunn Company represented the landlord, Chicago-based 321 E. Little Tokyo Master LLC. The tenant was repped by GSA.

-Staff

HFF Arranges $42 Mil Refi Loan on Downtown LA Medical Office Building

RENTV.com

 

Boulevard Investment Group Inc has refinanced Samaritan Medical Tower with a new $42.7 mil loan that was arranged by Marc Schillinger of HFF. The 10-year, fixed-rate CMBS loan is interest-only throughout the entire term.

Samaritan Medical Tower, a 146.4k sf medical office building, is located at 1127 Wilshire Blvd in downtown Los Angeles. Originally built in 1964, the property was extensively renovated in 2000 and 2014.

Samaritan Medical Tower is situated directly across the street from Good Samaritan Hospital, a 408-bed, world-class academic medical center affiliated with both USC and UCLA Schools of Medicine. This location is convenient to the 110 Fwy and nearby development projects in downtown Los Angeles including the Wilshire Grand, 6th & Bixel, The Bloc, and the Good Samaritan Hospital expansion.

-Staff

How to Attract (and Keep) Asian Investors in LA

Bisnow

 

With a downturn in China’s economy, Chinese investors are shifting capital to core US markets and much of this money is landing in LA.

“Geography is the real reason for Chinese investing here,” says Rising Realty Partners COO Chris Rising (with Athens Group COO Jay Newman) at Bisnow’s Cash Infusion: Impact of Foreign Investment on SoCal Real Estate event last week at the Luxe Sunset Boulevard Hotel. He opined, however, that if the US wants to attract foreign capital, Congress should repeal a draconian US law that imposes double taxation on foreign investors.

Downtown LA’s Central City Association CEO Carol Schatz (snapped with Jay) is concerned that LA’s arduous entitlement process and policies that disincentivize development will adversely impact the flow of Chinese investment capital to the city. “Chinese investors have engaged great talent here, but getting projects through LA’s bureaucracy is a frustration they’re not faced with in China. Additionally, she noted, “Some of the things the Council does chips away at what we accomplish, like the $15 minimum wage. They’re also doing affordable inclusionary zoning for for-sale housing,” Carol added, noting that “we need to make sure that we create an environment positive for investment.”

Athens Group COO Jay Newman agreed, suggesting that the City of LA is lacking in terms of vision and leadership. “There are significant barriers to entry so we have flight to quality,” he said. "Rather than coming Downtown, the tech industry is going to Playa Vista." Athens develops luxury resort destinations.

Genler regional managing principal Rob Jernigan (snapped with Bisnow's Southern California director Sean Spear) offered a different perspective. He believes global investors will continue to come to LA because they love coastal communities. “LA is still a good deal in that respect—not like the People’s Republic of San Francisco,” he joked. Rob noted that the region is experiencing exponential growth that makes it attractive to global investors. Metro’s Regional Transit Connector Project, which will connect local and regional destinations with rail service, along with major developments like Metropolis and Korean Air’s $1B, 1.7M SF mixed-use complex, Wilshire Grand Center (which includes a 73-story InterContinental Hotel) are game changing, he says.

Moderator and Allen Matkins global real estate chair Tony Natsis says that 80% of foreign investors are Asian. “The Chinese are doing big, dense, sexy stuff,” he says, stressing that it would be beneficial for local officials to get an understanding of cultural differences, as well as familiar with the way the Chinese are used to doing business. For example, he says, once a Chinese investor signs an LOI, "they’re done and local people take over.”

CBRE EVP Laurie Lustig-Bower, who sold the Metropolis site in Downtown to Greenland USA and the site of the former Robinson-May department store on Wilshire in Beverly Hills to Chinese developer Wanda Group, noted that Chinese investors have a different view of when a transaction occurs than is the reality, which can be a big problem for brokers. She explained in China, due diligence is done prior to signing a contract, but the opposite is true here. So when Greenland and Wanda signed contracts to buy these sites, they assumed it was a done deal and incorrectly announced to national US media outlets that they had acquired the sites, Laurie says. As a result of untimely press, she says, “I had 17 other offers and angry potential buyers calling me.”

Steinberg Architects CEO David Hart suggested that Asian investors look at areas adjacent to the hot Downtown and Hollywood markets, because they present tremendous opportunities. Landsea Holdings SVP Bill Pisetsky says his firm, a leading Chinese residential developer, is doing just that. Landsea is underway on a 200-home community in Simi Valley and close to closing a deal locally with 600 lots. Bill says his company is seeing diversity in Chinese investor levels. “We’re seeing midsized investors and eight to 10 families pooling their money to invest in the US market,” he says, noting that his company had to limit the number of Chinese buying homes here, because it wants to become a US homebuilder brand.

Singapore’s OUE Ltd VP John Gamboa says his company is the top Asian investor in the US, with $10B invested in core markets. The company, which owns Downtown LA’s US Bank Tower, is looking for opportunities throughout the LA region. “We’re keeping our eyes open, looking at secondary markets. When we first opened our platform here, we were set on Downtown LA and Beverly Hills, but we’re now looking at Playa Vista,” he says, noting that the whole Westside market is hot. “We’re still interested in Downtown, but are not limiting ourselves as much as we used to do.”

The final word came from World Trade Center Los Angeles president Stephen Cheung. Although the proposed Trans-Pacific Trade Partnership before Congress is geared to boosting trade commerce, Cheung believes that, if approved, it will have a dramatic impact on local infrastructure development and boost real estate values, from the ports to the Inland Empire. Noting that 40% of all incoming ocean-going cargo comes through LA County ports, Stephen advised, “This is the time to invest heavily, not just in port facilities, but also distribution facilities in the Inland Empire.”

-Patricia Kirk

Looking Towards the Past and Future with Studio One Eleven's Alan Pullman

Bisnow

 

Before founding Studio One Eleven, senior principal Alan Pullman was working at a commercial firm with a focus on retail properties. Throughout the 1990s, Alan was designing regional malls and shopping centers across the US, but, by a sheer stroke of luck, he was handed a neighborhood revitalization project in his own neighborhood in Long Beach, CA. The project had Alan working with shop owners, the merchants’ association and the community to revitalize the street and make it safer, walkable and more vibrant.

The project was a revelation for Alan, who realized that he wanted to contribute to the rehabilitation of neighborhoods that had meaning to him—mainly, SoCal. More importantly, however, was the focus on working with existing tenants and buildings to revitalize West Coast cities in small, incremental, organic developments, rather than giant master plans that come out of the blue and impose themselves on the existing communities. With this new mindset, Alan opened Studio One Eleven.

“We do not aspire to be an international firm,” Alan tells Bisnow, “because I don’t want to enter communities where I feel we don’t know the context or the relationships people have in their communities. I like the idea of participatory design, where stakeholders are involved in what happens to the community."

As such, Alan and Studio One Eleven have placed a great focus on the concept of “architecture of place” rather than an “architecture of time.” This means asking what existing buildings are made out of and how they tie into the culture and circumstances of the neighborhood, as opposed to prescribing to a certain style or look. Alan says that protecting existing structures not only preserves the unreplaceable designs, but is also a financially sound and sustainable solution.

Maintaining these buildings and “architecture of place,” is easier said than done, however. A lot of the properties that Studio One Eleven deals with are heavily contested by their stakeholders and historic preservation groups, who wish to keep the property as is. Alan insists that Studio One Eleven is not a historic preservation architect firm in the purist sense.
---------------------------

All titles, content, publisher names, trademarks, artwork, and associated imagery are trademarks and/or copyright material of their respective owners. All rights reserved. The Spam Archive website contains material for general information purposes only. It has been written for the purpose of providing information and historical reference containing in the main instances of business or commercial spam.

Many of the messages in Spamdex's archive contain forged headers in one form or another. The fact that an email claims to have come from one email address or another does not mean it actually originated at that address! Please use spamdex responsibly.


Yes YOU! Get INVOLVED - Send in your spam and report offenders

Create a rule in outlook or simply forward the junk email you receive to questions@spamdex.co.uk | See contributors

Google + Spam 2010- 2017 Spamdex - The Spam Archive for the internet. unsolicited electric messages (spam) archived for posterity. Link to us and help promote Spamdex as a means of forcing Spammers to re-think the amount of spam they send us.

The Spam Archive - Chronicling spam emails into readable web records index for all time

Please contact us with any comments or questions at questions@spamdex.co.uk. Spam Archive is a non-profit library of thousands of spam email messages sent to a single email address. A number of far-sighted people have been saving all their spam and have put it online. This is a valuable resource for anyone writing Bayesian filters. The Spam Archive is building a digital library of Internet spam. Your use of the Archive is subject to the Archive's Terms of Use. All emails viewed are copyright of the respected companies or corporations. Thanks to Benedict Sykes for assisting with tech problems and Google Indexing, ta Ben.

Our inspiration is the "Internet Archive" USA. "Libraries exist to preserve society's cultural artefacts and to provide access to them. If libraries are to continue to foster education and scholarship in this era of digital technology, it's essential for them to extend those functions into the digital world." This is our library of unsolicited emails from around the world. See https://archive.org. Spamdex is in no way associated though. Supporters and members of http://spam.abuse.net Helping rid the internet of spam, one email at a time. Working with Inernet Aware to improve user knowlegde on keeping safe online. Many thanks to all our supporters including Vanilla Circus for providing SEO advice and other content syndication help | Link to us | Terms | Privacy | Cookies | Complaints | Copyright | Spam emails / ICO | Spam images | Sitemap | All hosting and cloud migration by Cloudworks.

Important: Users take note, this is Spamdex - The Spam Archive for the internet. Some of the pages indexed could contain offensive language or contain fraudulent offers. If an offer looks too good to be true it probably is! Please tread, carefully, all of the links should be fine. Clicking I agree means you agree to our terms and conditions. We cannot be held responsible etc etc.

The Spam Archive - Chronicling spam emails into readable web records

The Glass House | London | SW19 8AE |
Spamdex is a digital archive of unsolicited electronic mail 4.9 out of 5 based on reviews
Spamdex - The Spam Archive Located in London, SW19 8AE. Phone: 08000 0514541.