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8 Reasons to Plan a Trip to Block Island

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Where to Shop on Block Island, Rhode Island
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New Shoreham, Rhode Island — the only township on Block Island, 13 miles off Rhode Island's mainland coast — takes all the best parts of New England's better-known island destinations and leaves behind the country club vibes. Gorgeous beaches with rolling dunes and bluffs? Check. Blue hydrangea bushes and old Victorian inns? Check. Fresh fried seafood, and plenty of opportunities for souvenir shopping? Check and check.

But unlike some other seasonal locales, the shops in this down-to-earth beach town are particularly affordable — and varied. Sure, there are more than a few places to pick up fudge and taffy, or overpriced sweatshirts and cotton T-shirts proclaiming their allegiance to Block Island. But there's a whole lot more, from a vintage and thrift store chockablock with retro knick-knacks to boutiques shilling handmade jewelry, home wares, and other accessories from all over the world.

Whether you're just stopping over for a day trip from Providence or New London (which is an easy train ride from New York, by the way) or shacking up for a whole week, be sure to check out a few of our favorite shops on Block Island.

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The Piercing-Inspired Clothing Trend Taking Over Instagram
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The art of piercing is hardly a new phenomenon. It’s a trend that has been going in and out of fashion for millennia, with the first-ever earlobe piercing dating back to more than 5,000 years ago on a mummified body found near present-day Austria.

Piercing noses in the Middle East (to alleviate child birth), tongues in Mayan and Aztec civilizations (as offerings to the gods), and lips in Alaskan Eskimo tribes (for religious reasons) soon followed. And long before Rihanna freely flaunted hers, Isabella of Bavaria, the queen of France, introduced flashy nipple piercings to women in the 1300s.

The 21st century has seen its fair share of piercing trends, too, and thanks to a handful of designers these past few seasons, partaking in the ancient art can be as easy and painless as putting on a T-shirt.

Tiny metal bars, rings, barbells, and studs are having a major resurgence in the fashion world: see the over-the-top facial jewelry on Givenchy’s fall 2015 runway or the grunge-inspired brow rings at Rodarte spring 2015. The trend was still very much alive during the fall 2016 collections, with pierced angora sweater dresses at Alexander Wang and leather barbell handbags and blouses at J.W.Anderson.

The young brand Life in Perfect Disorder is even taking over Instagram with its pierced designs, seen on models and actresses like Ruby Rose.

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How One Makeup App Took Over the Industry
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In January the mobile makeover and beauty social-sharing app YouCam Makeup crossed the 100 million download threshold for IOS and Android, cementing its place as the number one makeover app in the world. That would be a feat for any mobile brand, but it’s an especially impressive one considering it hadn’t even celebrated its second birthday yet.

YouCam shows no signs of slowing down, now at 160 million downloads. Add in its sister programs YouCam Perfect (a photo editing program) and YouCam Nails and that number goes up to 260 million downloads worldwide with over one billion visits a month. Calling the entire suite a runaway success wouldn’t be an overstatement.

If you’re not one of the folks obsessively checking out the makeup app, allow us to explain: It uses augmented reality (a.k.a. the same type of technology featured in Pokémon Go, in which a real image is manipulated with 3-D imaging) to allow people to try on lipsticks, blush, eye makeup, faux lashes, contacts, and more, as well as save and share the looks they create. Launched in August 2014 by makers Perfect Corp., the program quickly gained users organically through word-of-mouth from beauty lovers, thanks in part to the social element that allows users to communicate and find like-minded makeup enthusiasts.

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A selection from the editors at Racked
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The Best Looks From the 2016 Olympics
USA in Ralph Lauren, France in Lacoste and all the other designers contributing to the uniforms you'll see in Rio.
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