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This $10 Serum Is Going to Sell Out at Sephora

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Beauty
This Cheap Target Haircare Line Is Really Popular for a Reason
Kristen Ess hair products

I’m a big sucker for buying things I see on Instagram — especially beauty products. I like having the co-sign from real people I know that something works, so much so that they want to talk about it on the internet without getting #paid. This was most recently the case with Kristin Ess, a really cute and miracle-working haircare line that’s only available at Target.

Ess, a celeb hairstylist and co-founder of The Beauty Department, launched the line last January. Given that the entire range rang in under $14 and was created by a literal famous hair person, it got people excited! But because I’m a professional skeptic and wildly overprotective of my thick curls, it took a flood of praise from some of my favorite beauty follows for me to actually give it a try. (It also didn’t hurt that the packaging is so! damn! good!) I’m on the other side now, and I truly can’t say enough about this stuff. Tanisha Pina, market editor

Click through for two of the best products>>

“I have shouted out to the universe and still haven’t received a clear answer of why women’s jeans cannot be sized as men’s are — a simple waist size available in a variety of different length sizes.” Deanna of Overland Park, Kansas

This week, writer Rachel McCarthy James tackles what its like to shop as a tall woman. “I prefer to shop online because I hate going to stores, trying on things that don’t fit, and leaving completely demoralized,” says Ashley of Salt Lake City. So: Where to shop? Rachel writes, “Several women I spoke to mentioned Old Navy as their go-to place for some actual options without the attendant stress of wondering whether or not they will fit.” Read the full story, with more shopping recs, here

Beauty
Don’t Be Surprised If This $10 Serum Sells Out at Sephora

Deciem, the parent company of super affordable skincare line The Ordinary, has had a hard time keeping products in stock pretty much since it launched 18 months ago. Skincare obsessives on a budget appreciate its price point (most products are less than $10) and its efficacy (all products are based on ingredients that have been around for a while and are well-tested and high-performing).

The Racked team frequently bemoans the unavailability of the brand’s niacinamide and zinc formula, which is its most popular product. In fact, it’s currently sold out at Sephora, where The Ordinary launched last month. And I think the retailer should brace itself for another sell-out.

Yesterday Kim Kardashian proclaimed the brand’s Granactive Retinoid 2% Emulsion ($9.80) one of her favorite products for “slowing the aging process.” Despite the fact that she maybe doesn’t realize that we’re not calling things anti-aging anymore, this is a notable callout if for no other reason than it is affordable. 

Retinoids (learn about about them here) are almost universally recommended by dermatologists for improving skin texture and fine lines. (Kim clearly knows her stuff because she recommends no fewer than three retinol products on the list, including these Shiseido eye masks.) A Deciem rep tells me that this Kim K. moment was not paid or sponsored in any way, so do with that information what you will. Cheryl Wischhover, senior beauty reporter

Shopping
Where Vintage Style Bloggers Get Their Clothes
A model wearing vintage clothing

While interest in true vintage clothing is growing, it can be difficult to find authentic items from the ’40s, ’50s, and ’60s, and much tougher from times earlier than those eras. If you can find something, the size range of what’s available is often small, leaving out large groups of vintage fans.

That’s where reproduction boutiques come in. Many shops have popped up within the last decade to reproduce items from the post-war time period, some even using original patterns and fabrics. If you’re looking to try out a pillbox hat like Midge Maisel, interested in a classic red lipstick, or thinking of going full pinup, there are lots of options at myriad price points, not to mention styles and sizes for many bodies. Here's a few of the best. —Annemarie Dooling, contributing writer

Unique Vintage: The go-to for entry-level retro fast fashion. Coming out of a boutique in Burbank, California, Unique Vintage carries a huge variety of dresses, skirts, shoes, and accessories from many of the brands on this list, and it frequently sends sale alerts and email discount codes to newsletter subscribers and members of its Facebook group. If you’re just starting out, this is a great place to begin.

The Pretty Dress Company: As the name suggests, this is the place to find the dress of your dreams. The cuts are extremely ’40s-, ’50s-, and ’60s-leaning, with tucked-in waists and longer hems and pencil skirts. They aren’t cheap, but the quality is amazing. If you’ve been eyeing a gorgeous vintage blogger on Insta, this is where they got that dress.

Vixen by Micheline Pitt: Micheline Pitt’s pinup empire includes VixenLa Femme Noir, and Bad Girl Denim, but Vixen is the real star here — particularly for its size-inclusive tops and pencil skirts (which come in up to a 4X!). Don’t sleep on the kinky/cute lapel pins and hoop earrings, either.

Vivien of Holloway: Sure, VoH’s dresses are killer, but the brand also features a line of women’s tops and trousers that are some of the best in the industry, complete with ’40s- and ’50s-style details like side buttons and flattering high cuts in full-length pants, shorts, and even capris.

Dozens more, right this way>>

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